Russian Tank Races -intl Army Games 2019 near Moscow (VIDEO)

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Ramjet38, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. AK_Stick

    AK_Stick AAAMAD

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    Where the turbines scream, and the GAUs gleam
    Well, some do.
     
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  2. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    Maybe. The Germans have very few operational tanks today.
    The damning report described how only 95 of the German army's 244 Leopard main battle tanks are currently operational because of maintenance issues.Feb 20, 2018

    What is not advertised is how long the Russian tanks will go without maintenance.

    The general rule is that for one hour of operations an M1A1 will need 8 hours of maintenance. This is ‘man-hours’, so a crew of four will need to conduct 2:1 maintenance to operation. Much of this maintenance is preventative in nature; checking and changing oils and fluids, track-tension and adjustment, verifying optics are still functioning properly, etc. A lot of preventative maintenance is actually checking for parts that are wearing out or failing, but haven’t caused a system to fail yet; and then replacing them.

    So without any parts, most tanks could probably operate for a few days, assuming you had the necessary oils and fuels to keep the tank running.

    I understand that the mighty German tanks in WW2 could go about 100 miles. The T34 Soviet tank was designed to last 6 months without combat. In combat, the life expectancy of the T34 was 14 hours!
     

  3. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    The T72 was/is a respectable tank for what it is and costs. It can't hold a candle to an Abrams tank unless the T72 tank crew really knows what they are doing and how to minimize the tactical advantages of the M1. The Russians don't look at Tanks the same way we do anyhow... Their whole doctrine relies on numerical superiority to this day.

    I've had my M1 up to 50 MPH and slightly faster down a hill...it wasn't close to redlining the engine or tranny but as mentioned the track's not really built for that kind of speed. Tactically the speed is a plus but remember you cannot advance in any significant way faster than your slowest vehicle (or fuel resupply cababilty...)
     
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  4. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    Just an FYi...we never changed the oil on an M1 Engine because it designed to burn oil as it runs....the engine held like 18 quarts of turboshaft high speed synthetic oil and it wasn't unusual to burn a quart and a half a day in normal operation.

    The track and suspension required the most maintenance--though the M1 was WAY beter than the M60 in this respect. You could literally adjust track tension with a grease gun and the M1 rarely broke torsion bars compared to the M60. The track was mechanically identical in terms of it being live track connected with pins and end connectors, and wedge bolts but the M1 was hard on track and you'd do well to get 900-1100 miles out of a set of track at about $75k a pair... :)

    Things that needed a lot of maintenance on an M1? Battery box...6 large lead acid batteries always bouncing around and brackets/connections come loose. Commo...we had OLD radios and they didn't play nice with sand and water...this has changed now. Machine guns...three of em....clean and lubed daily. In the desert--air filters--in Germany not so much. Every now and again the sighting system/thermal sights would go down....that's a call to the company tracked vehicle mechanic. Nothing for the crew to do there. Just about everything on the tank is in component form. Of the engine or transmission went down its pulled and replaced as a complete unit and a Company level maintenance team with an M88 can pull and replace an entire powerpack in less than an hour....I've seen it done in 20 minutes in a competition...

    Honestlly, the thing that took the most time in terms of maintenance was cleaning the dirt and sand and mud out of the turret and drivers station...it was an ongoing battle and no matter what you did there's virtually no way to keep the thing clean as 4 people get in and out of the vehicle all day long plus whatever dust and grime makes its way into the hatches during a road march with dozens of other tracked vehicles... That was universally the biggest maintenance challenge of all tracked vehicles--it was even worse in troop carriers like the Bradley...

    I had the mount for my Commander's station M2 break while deployed and it was going to take a week to get the part according to the parts supply clerk. I took the broken mount to a machine shop in this craphole little town with a bunch of goats and kids running around. The machine shop has a greasy piece of cloth as his front door. The machine shop guy comes out and starts talking to my interpreter as they look at the part...the owner screams something at his little boy who goes running off down the road (that had me worried)... The owner tells us to sit down in the shade and he runs into his shop and you hear the machine tools humming away and the sound of metal being cut. In two minutes the kid comes back with two cold cokes and a half an hour later the machinist comes out with a perfect replica of the original part... And the interpretor and the owner begin to haggle how much for the part....the price is settled and I had him a $5 bill which included a tip for the fast service! Got back to the tank and it fit perfectly and I was back in the .50 cal business.... I think that part costs the taxpayer like $250.... Hell, the story is worth $5 and I got a coke out of the deal...
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
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  5. ReaPer105

    ReaPer105

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    Russians race them and half the US raises hell because we crank them to run in a parade.
     
  6. Ramjet38

    Ramjet38 Mentally Frozen

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    Yes, you're right.
     
  7. AK_Stick

    AK_Stick AAAMAD

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    I'm not familiar with the AGT1500, it may be a mechanically governed, but lots of turbines these days are going to Full Authority Digital Electronic Control where they have a brain box that does everything. However some, like my Arriel 1E2's are not limited, they rely completely upon the operator to not junk them.
     
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  8. Ramjet38

    Ramjet38 Mentally Frozen

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    I've only worked on older military jet engines for both fixed wing and choppers and they both had over-speed govenors. I'm sure there's many that don't.
     
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  9. ThomasM4

    ThomasM4

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    For those that would be interested in reading more.
    https://thesovietarmourblog.blogspot.com/2015/05/t-72-soviet-progeny.html?m=1

    I've always had a intrest in Soviet hardware guess from growing up during the closing days of the cold war.
    The Russians have some pretty good designer's unfortunately or fortunately depending which side your looking on. The engineering and manufacturing is far behind of what they are actually able to produce.
    The t72 design has been pretty adaptable spend little time looking at some of the upgrades different countries and private companies have come out for it is pretty neat. I know of 2 companies and theres probably more, I just dont know about that offer modern western power packs.
    Thermal optics also seems to be big hurtle for them. There newest export version the t72bm1s is the first export version iam a wear of that actually has thermal optics.
    Russia does hamstring there export models alot ive wonder why if they are having money issues even upgrading there own stuff I would think that exporting the most modern versions would allow them to get more for there own army. o_O
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  10. Ramjet38

    Ramjet38 Mentally Frozen

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    The last great Russian piece of hardware was the Kalashnikov.
     
  11. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    The biggest flaw in the T72 is it only has a three man crew and the mechanical loader is also slow and highly prone to malfunction. The 125mm main gun is powerful but its limited by a crude fire control system with a max effective range of 1900 meters--whereas all the 120mm NATO cannons will make hits out to 4000 meters.

    There's really no room in that turret design to retrofit Thermal sights in any practical way. Tank thermal sights take a good deal of space and that isnt something that"s abundant os Russian tanks.

    Also, dont believe all the hype you read about how well armored the t72 was...maybe compared to an M60...but our tanks and bradleys had no problem slicing and dicing a T72 and i personally saw one knocked out by a Bradley 25mm cannon by one of my Scout Platoon leaders who was lucky he didn't eat a Russian sabot round.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
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