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Runners and lifters: knee and back brace suggestions needed...

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning' started by The Habit, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. The Habit

    The Habit كافر

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    I'm picking up my old weight bench from my parents' house this weekend and need back brace recommendations. I have a recent history of muscle pulls in my back. Do I just pick up whatever is in the sporting goods aisle at Wal-Mart?

    Now that I've quit smoking (knock on wood) I'd also like to start running again. I used to run about 30 miles per week and would like to get back up to that pace or better but, alas, have meniscus problems from a skiing incident 15 years ago. I need a knee brace that is supportive laterally but is light and breathes well.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. DBradD

    DBradD

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    I think your best tool for avoiding back problems is taking it easy and using perfect form. Other than that, I doubt that there's anything better than a typical belt.

    Running and worried about injuries? [bitter rant mode on]My personal bias is that the best way to avoid injury is to not run, unless you're emotionally driven to do so. I ran A LOT in high school and have tried to restart running a few times over the years, and every dang time, I end up having to stop because of some kind of injury. I've lost count, but I think I'm up to about 5 times as of last time. Ankle, foot, knee--last time it was my left calf. I was running along about a month after I started, taking it extremely easy (yeah, yeah, I know: start slowly, correct form, good shoes, stretching, etc--all was textbook) and BAM, I was limping for 2-3 weeks. I've had it with running. I think the practically infinite number of impact loads (about 3x your bodyweight on one leg) will cause injuries more often than it's worth, except for those who are very "into" running from an emotional standpoint. Ever notice that half (slight exaggeration...) the articles in running magazines are about how to deal with injury? [bitter rant mode off] For cardio health and fat burning, I think a good old fashioned stairmaster or bike would serve the rest of us delicate folks very well.

    DBD
     

  3. The Habit

    The Habit كافر

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    Thanks for the info... yeah, I'm kind of attached to running, much more so that any other cardio. I'll give it a go and see how the knee handles it.
     
  4. DBradD

    DBradD

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    I hope it goes well. Some people just fell drawn to running, so it's worth it for them. The typical advice is just to start slow, veeerrrry slow, like walking for the first few times, then running only a quarter mile or whatever, and slowly working up. I assume that you know all about stretching, etc.

    DBD
     
  5. Jack Walcott

    Jack Walcott

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    I suggest you read this book: Healing Back Pain, the Mind Body Connection by Dr. John Sarno. You can get it used from Amazon for a few bucks. Lucky for me, someone mentioned it on another forum. I got it, read it, and try to live it.

    Prior to reading this book, I was obssessed with trying to find the perfect routine where I would not get injured, blah blah blah. Now, I am doing dino type training and gradually pushing my weights up. I am able to deadlift, squat, power clean and overhead press without worry for my back. Hope this helps. Jack

    you should be able to run again.
     
  6. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

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    Don't rely on braces. All that will do is keep the support muscles weak while the lifting muscles get stronger, leading to more imbalance, and more injuries. Just start slow, suck it up and build up everything. Trust me on this, I learned the hard way.
     
  7. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    I couldn't get the private email feature to come up.

    You need to think outside the box.

    The fundamental concern is being able to articulate (move through) all portions of your body.

    The first reaction is to fight against the back, fight against the knee. So, the first thought is to redouble the efforts - lift more weights, run more.

    Aren't your real goals to work with the back problem and work with the knee problem?

    Stretching exercises (isometrics) were considered sissy up until about 30 years ago. Only sissies and girls worked with 5 pound weights and did aerobics. Now the better athletes do them.

    Ask yourself, who is in better shape? A dancer from the Julliard School in New York who can move through all parts of his/her body or some guy who popped a disc lifting too many weights at the gym?

    My shoulders are destroyed. I cannot do knife or stick fighting any more. I take privates in sansoo because my back is destroyed and I can not take being thrown to the mat or hit. I was told last year that I will never be able to run again and was hospitalized repeatedly and was unable to walk.

    What to do? I do stretching exercises, aerobics, dance. My cardiovascular is outstanding. My blood pressure is low. I can walk again. Now I am working on Pilates concepts for the back.

    If I followed the conventional wisdom of braces and supports, I would be back to the same condition of not walking.
     
  8. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    I was referred to a fantastically fit Russian dancer for my own rehab. There have been two sessions now. The injured portions of the body have been identified and exercises learned that have enabled me to overcome stiffness. The exercises involve developing muscle memory and stretching muscle groups to make them stronger or to develop new paths.

    I can go through the movements slowly enough now NOT to injure myself. Compare that ability to simply running or lifting weights that can aggravate the condition that you are trying to assist by wearing braces.