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? Rock Cornish hens

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by noway, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. noway

    noway

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    anybody raise these for table comsumption? any pro/cons in raising these? My friend was looking at quail but he mention about get some cornish hens and letting run around the property until either a cat gets one of they grab one up for the grill.
     
  2. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    I thought "Cornish Game Hen" was an industry term for a small regular chicken.

    Did I miss something?

    BTW this is a PET OWNERS forum ;f

    Next, how to raise Chinchillas for "fun and profit".
     

  3. ATL Peach Girl

    ATL Peach Girl ♥Meezers♥

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    someone needs to move this to the FOOD FORUM.......;f ;a
     
  4. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Oh no we don't!

    I am not too comfortable with seeing my food while it is still alive ;g
     
  5. pizzaaguy

    pizzaaguy

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    http://www.zenreich.com/ZenWeb/cornishhen.htm

    Why are they called "Cornish Game Hens"?

    It's probably because no one would want to buy and cook something called "baby chickens". So here's a little poultry trivia.

    From the U.S.D.A. web site about poultry:

    (a) Rock Cornish game hen or Cornish game hen. A Rock Cornish game hen or Cornish game hen is a young immature chicken (usually 5 to 6 weeks of age), weighing not more than 2 pounds ready-to-cook weight, which was prepared from a Cornish chicken or the progeny of a Cornish chicken crossed with another breed of chicken.

    There is much more information about different types of poultry on the U.S.D.A. page, and is worth a visit (search for the word "Cornish").

    I've learned that main differences in chicken products revolve around the age at processing

    Cornish hens are processed between 5 and 6 weeks old
    Broiler/fryers at around 13 weeks
    Roasters at 3 to 5 months
    Capons are under 8 months (and of course, surgically unsexed)
    Hen, fowl, or baking or stewing chicken are more than 10 months old