Robin Hunting Can Be Legal!

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by PlasticGuy, May 31, 2003.

  1. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

    Messages:
    5,165
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2000
    I VERY rarely make any comments on closed threads. In fact, this is the first time. But I must say that the moderator who closed the rabbit thread based on statements about hunting robins was off-base.

    I have spent several summers legally hunting robins, and was paid to do it. Robins are to berry farmers as prairie dogs are to alfalfa farmers. Robins eat berries (blueberries especially) at every opportunity, and can completely desimate a crop if left unchecked. A corporation of berry growers that I worked for in high school had a "Migratory Songbird Permit" that allowed them to shoot several hundred robins every year. In fact, I was paid $12 per hour to shoot the heck out of them with a shotgun and an RWS pellet gun. That's a great way to make some extra money, and I know for a fact that the program is still in operation. My father is still their Agronomist, and shoots dozens of robins every year. I go back to shoot robins a few times per year just for sport, and the farmers love it. They still supply all the ammo I can shoot.
     
    happyguy, -JCN- and Atomic Punk like this.
  2. noway

    noway

    Messages:
    8,735
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2000
    Location:
    Davie "Cowboy" , FL
    I learn something new everyday. Never heard of a songbird permit.

    Interesting and I guess with the permit being issue a true need to reduce the song bird population for the blueberry farmers. I still don't appreciate the ruthless and uncaring killing of animals that was mention in that past closed thread and if the guy truely was shooting a Robin with a valid "songbird permit" will I give my apologies. I higly doubt he had a songbird permit or valid reason for killing, hunting or whatever you want to call it, for the Robin.

    I know for a fact that the FWS had once placed the Robin on the a threaten listing for Migratory Birds in some areas. Scientist and other groups moinitors the bird and other thrush like birds movement for general ecology reports.
     
    happyguy likes this.

  3. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

    Messages:
    5,165
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2000
    You may well be right that the individual doesn't have a permit. But he might. Regardless, I just wanted to mention the possibility and relate my experience. I also wanted to let people know that robins are pests in some areas. Like you, I don't condone killing for killing's sake. Except maybe snakes. And ants. But generally not. ;)
     
  4. glockster96

    glockster96 Moderator Lifetime Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2001
    Location:
    Kansas
    Thanks for the information.

    However, I don't really think I was offbase with my original comments:

    The thread was offtopic, and I did still don't know specific laws about robin hunting.



    Don't worry about re-opening the thread. That's perfectly acceptable (in this case). If this one stays civilized, it will remain open. ;)

    Regards,

    glockster96
     
  5. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

    Messages:
    5,165
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2000
    I appreciate the moderators' open-mindedness with this. Because the poster from the original thread hasn't responded, I would guess that his robin shooting may not have been legal. Still I think he should have the opportunity to explain if he so chooses. Mine was legal, and it was probably the best job I've ever had. :cool:
     
  6. glockster96

    glockster96 Moderator Lifetime Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2001
    Location:
    Kansas
    Very cool....Did you luck into that job, or did you have to apply, show your shooting skill, etc.?;)
     
  7. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    I will venture a guess on this topic of a closed thread. First of all I would like to say that I hold no ill thoughts toward the moderators of this message board. And we had a civil discussion about it in private messages.

    I posted a thread a few days ago about a porcupine I had shot and it was deleted on the basis of being a "gratuitous slaying". Then I pointed out that shooting a pocupine was no more gratuitous than shooting a rabbit with a .45 ACP or prarrie dog hunting. Killing a pocupine is a form of varmit control as is prarrie dog hunting. In fact they can even cause damage to other animal.

    Anyway, right after that I noticed the thread about the rabbit was closed. You can blame me for getting that thread closed. Sorry!!!

    I probably should have been more clear about the reason for shooting the porcupine in the thread and then mentioned the ballistic tendancies of the .40 S&W from a Glock 22 to make it seem less gratuitous.
     
  8. glockster96

    glockster96 Moderator Lifetime Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2001
    Location:
    Kansas
    Agreed.:)
     
  9. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

    Messages:
    5,165
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2000
    I was already working for them, and they knew that I was a shooter. It just kind of worked out. If I could do that full time, I would be in heaven!
     
  10. Deadmeat

    Deadmeat

    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Location:
    MS gulf coast
    I will give my side on shooting the robin since this is where everything got started. My dad has a big garden behind his house in the country and we shoot to keep everything from being eaten up. Also, we have a cubby of quail which is rare around our parts around his house and we also take care of other predatory animals so that the few quail we do have wont be wiped out. I am familiar with the songbird license. In some areas, shooting crows and coyotes can be done year round because of being a (nuecance, brain fart?) even though there is a season on them. When the robins migrate, they come to So. MS by the millions. The robins are more plentiful than our doves and ducks. Thanks for letting me express my side of the story and remember, we're all on the same side!;)
     
  11. TriMode

    TriMode Cranky Member

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    Location:
    Nor-Cal
    I know I'll probably be the first dope to ask this question. I've hunted dove and quail for years. Both are small but tasty, when prepared right. Has anyone ever prepared a robin? If you're able to shoot that many of them has anyone ever tried one? I'm not in a hurry to try any I'm just curious if anyone has.
    The first joker to say they taste like chicken will be dealt with severely.;f
     
  12. noway

    noway

    Messages:
    8,735
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2000
    Location:
    Davie "Cowboy" , FL
    I think an avg sized Mourning Dove is small, I would hate to have to prep a Robin.
     
  13. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    Not to make a joke about tasting like chicken, but does anyone know where chicken nuggets come from?
     
  14. noway

    noway

    Messages:
    8,735
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2000
    Location:
    Davie "Cowboy" , FL
    Yes McDonalds or you're freezer section at the local store.

    Are you are talking about real chicken nuggets that deep fryed chunks of chicken breast or are we talking about McDonalds "who knows what their meat is" chicken nuggets?


    I read a report that the Tyson & Purdue chicken farms are raising generic chickens with no bills and feathers just to get quick mass production chickens for sales to stores and restraurants.

    And no, I would think that a Robin would not taste like Chicken.
     
  15. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    About the size of a dressed robin compared to the size of a chicken nugget. LOL;a

    I also have heard about the Tyson chickens that you were talking about. They are pretty much a mass of flesh that gets fed by a tube and has genetic material that kinda resembles chickens. No bill, no feathers, and no bone structure that will support the animal. Kinda sick, and people pay good money to eat that crap.
     
  16. aus_chip

    aus_chip

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2002
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    Hate to tell you guys this, but the Tyson/Perdue/KFC stories about beakless, featherless, meat sack chickens are urban legends.
     
  17. valleyz

    valleyz Problem Child

    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2001
    Location:
    Mississippi
    I was thinking about survival food one day, when I noticed about 10 big fat Robins in the yard. I decided to search the internet for info on Robins and found out that they used to be harvested for food just like Doves until the PETA types gradually stopped it.

    Here's the link Turdus migratorius
    Scroll down to Conservation.

    I really don't know about eating anything named Turdus migratorius;P
     
  18. Kilgor

    Kilgor American Millennium Member

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 1999
    I have a B.S. in Poultry Science from the top program in the country (University of Arkansas) and trust me that no company in the industry has anything close to what was decribed above.
     
  19. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    Kilgor, I knew that BS and chickens could be found in the same barnyard but I didn't know that Arkansas had a college course to teach you that. ;f

    Sorry I couldn't pass that one up.
     
  20. Herman48

    Herman48

    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    42
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2018
    Location:
    Alabama
    They should taste better than chicken--if they taste like their European cousins. I was born and raised in Italy, and over there hunting for the most common varieties of thrush is traditional and legal. The Romans hunted for them, and Machiavelli writes of trapping them during his exile. European thrush are very similar to the American robin. Their size, shape, flight, wingbeat and even their song are similar. In flight the robin looks exactly like his European cousin. I used to hunt for thrush in Italy, and I ate God knows how many of them. In Italy they feed on olives, grapes, wild berries in the fall and winter, but around March, before their northward migration they eat mostly insects and worms. They are delicious. They are plucked (not skinned), gutted out and wiped clean (not washed). Legs and head are left attached. Then they are cooked in a variety of ways. I love them slowly roasted on a bed of embers, alternating them on a skewer with links of Italian sausage and slices of baguette, or--more simply--wrapped in a slice of lard (bacon will do) with bay leaves between the birds. You'll be surprised how thick and juicy their breast muscles are. I ate the breasts and the little thighs and drumsticks, working the meat off the bones with my incisors. Some people pop the whole thrush into their mouths and grind it down, bones and all, with their teeth. I guess that's a good way of getting your roughage together with your meat. What do they taste like? I'd say they are very similar to mourning doves and snipe, though more aromatic, especially if they have been feeding on juniper berries. Where I live (rural Alabama), when I see millions of them fly over my pasture and over my house on their way to their roosts, I am so tempted to grab my shotgun and harvest a dozen of them for a memorable dinner. But the law is the law, and I leave them be. I know several local rednecks who were surprised when I told them that killing them is a violation of the Migratory Bird Act and that the legal consequences of killing even one can be quite daunting. I don't think any of them kills robins any longer, but many told me of robin hunts with BB guns when they were kids and of how good these pretty birds tasted. There are about as many robins in this country as there are people. They are not in the least endangered. It would be great if the feds and individual states opened a limited hunting season on them. It would help berry growers, provide hunters with sporting opportunities, and put on the table some very delicious morsels. A yearly bag limit of 30 robins per year per hunter would not even put a minuscule dent in their population, and their harvest would be absolutely sustainable both in the short and the long run. Shall we start a petition?
     
    happyguy, kaisooba and Atomic Punk like this.