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Resume question

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Ender, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Ender

    Ender ComfortablyNumb

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    So...hello, GT. When I was asking these questions about 5 years ago (when I was a bit more active), I got a lot of help.

    So, I come back here thinking...perhaps you could help me again :)

    I have two current versions of my resume, which I'll be using to apply to typical IT type companies. Content is about the same; one is straightforward black and white listing of skills and job history, etc. The other one was modified up by an HR recruiter type, and a bit fancier (definitely eye catching).

    This one has a little color, a nice header, and a slightly different format.

    So, do I go with the fairly plain one (that got me my current job, so I know it works), or go with something that will stand out a bit and perhaps get me more noticed? I just don't want to come across as overly ostentatious, BUT considering this one was done by an HR specialist, who probably knows what is up when it comes to resumes, AND it looks awesome, maybe i'll take a chance.

    What say you, if you have experience hiring, or a nice wife who does? :D
     
  2. Jake514

    Jake514

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    I would go with the HR recruiter. They probably emphasized your best attributes first, and know what catches employer’s eyes. Triple check all punctuation, grammar, etc. Best of luck in your search!
     

  3. Goaltender66

    Goaltender66 NRA GoldenEagle

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    Hi, Ender!

    So your fancy version isn't in Comic Sans, is it?

    Anyway, depends on the job. IT tends to be a little looser so you can probably get away with using the fancy version as long as it isn't too out there (weird colors, watermark of Larry Ellis, etc). If you were going for a finance - type job I'd say stay with staid.

    When I look at resumes I try to focus on content over form, but if something isn't clearly laid out I won't spend a lot of time deciphering it. One hint...if you really want a particular interview and you have a copy of the job description, try tailoring the resume to the description by using some of their buzzwords, etc.
     
  4. Ender

    Ender ComfortablyNumb

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    The "good" part is that she didn't change the content much. At least I know I'm on the right track there. The format is much prettier and such....I was impressed right out of the gate...but dunno if looking "too good," gives bad impressions. Weird, huh? :D
     
  5. Ender

    Ender ComfortablyNumb

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    The font is "Book Antiqua" :shocked:

    This one is still simple and straightforward, just looks pretty. I will (naturally) edit as needed for jobs, or use the cover letter to accomplish that part of things.

    Speaking of which, I need to prepare an easily editable cover letter, lol...
     
  6. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    Hey goalie,
    I'm really surprised that you are not scoring the Pens/Flyers game - s'up with that?

    I read a number of resumes per month. I'm all about just a few things:

    *Can I read the thing easily
    *Balance between not too dense and not seven pages long - IT is likely an exception here
    *I don't give a flip what someone did 30 years ago - only
    exception is military stuff so far
    *I like black ink on white paper
    *I don't read mission statement type crap on a resume. Hit me with a short cover letter that tells all that stuff.
    *Left justification is easier to read

    I like headers to be similar to this.....

    Mr. Big Jim Slade
    addy
    cell or home phone
    email


    ETA - everyone alive must learn and use bullet-point formatted writing well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  7. Goaltender66

    Goaltender66 NRA GoldenEagle

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    I kind of want them both to lose. :whistling::supergrin:
     
  8. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    I don't like either team but it's great hockey. The Pens have erupted for 9!
     
  9. RayB

    RayB Retired Member

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    I used to use this approach...

    Synopsis of Resume of RayB

    Amplified Resume of RayB

    The synoptic resume is a quick-scan document that lets a prospective employer include or disqualify an applicant depending on their criterion or preferences. Some people you don’t want to work for.

    The amplified resume gives an in-depth review of what a person’s done and might do for the prospective employer.

    If I spoke to a prospective employer and that conversation went well, I would ask if they'd like to see a synopsis or an amplified resume complete with references.

    If I'd sent a synoptic resume, the cover letter would ask if the prospective employer would care to see an amplified resume complete with references, and I’d offer to bring it to an interview.

    Different vocations dictate different resumes. An amplified resume of a sales/management career with several employers and multiple promotions involving a fifty year old applicant will be several pages... Whereas, a thirty year old techy may simply bullet his certifications and skill sets, along with a brief employment history on a single page... Both approaches may be appropriate...

    Since I've always written my own resumes, I'd occasionally punch one up or tone one down to fit the interviewer... This does not mean lying to the prospective employer! To this day, if I say I know something or can do something, you can pretty much bank on it! You don't fudge results!

    At any rate, a resume will get you an interview, and an interview will land you a job. You must succeed at both.

    There's an old saying, "The best jobs are never advertised."

    Of the good jobs I've had, I have always solicited the position of my own volition, rather than reply to an ad that will generate 100 applicants, and then compete with 99-people for that job. In other words, I created my own circumstances... You know, now that I think of it in that context, that's exactly what Obama did, and will do to get reelected for a job he has no business even applying for... But I digress...

    --Ray
     
  10. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    I was just reading applications today. I don't give a rat's fart about glitzy fonts and colors. But anything that slows me down does not go in your favor, as I'm just gonna move on to the next application.

    Your goal is to make it as easy as possible for me to see that your skills and experience line up with what I've listed in the job requirements.

    I want to see that you've done it, where you've done it, and for how long. And I also want to see that you have an interest in the skills/expertise I'm looking for by seeing you belong to professional organizations in those areas of interest, or publishing in those areas, or hobbies in those areas. Something that gives a sense of validation that you are interested in what you are applying for.

    Some of the worst applications I read today were crammed full of stuff that didn't have much to do with what I was looking for. If they did indeed have the skills or work experience I wanted them to have, I missed it, and moved on to the next application.

    So in my opinion, if a job is worth applying to, then taylor your resume to it. It isn't enough to just try to sweet talk your cover letter toward the job.

    That's my 2 cents :)

    But I do have at least 3 possible candidates and a maybe. I'll reread the maybe sometime later. I wrote down the 4 names and will take 3 of them to the committee, and see who the other committee members picked, then we'll go from there to the interview stage :)
     
  11. argy1182

    argy1182

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    I agree. Colors and flashy things annoy me and I also don't care to read a dissertation on your life. Make it bullet points and easy to gain an understanding of your work experience.

    Keep it as short as possible. Two pages is plenty long.
     
  12. RayB

    RayB Retired Member

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    I never put things like hobbies and interests on a resume...

    I never concerned myself with "clever" writing on a cover letter...

    The cover letter should introduce you, provide a succinct description of what you've done and what you might do for this prospective employer, and ask for an interview!

    Do not put your photo on your resume!

    Do not use a nickname on your resume!

    Do not include an earnings or salary history unless its been specifically requested!

    Do not give reasons for leaving jobs, supervisor's names, references, etc., on a synoptic resume!

    And I wouldn't include stuff like, The Moose Lodge or Ducks Unlimited even on an amplified resume!

    Also, be mindful that some interviewers won't hire anybody smarter than they are! It's sad, but it's a fact.

    Be mindful that some interviewers are less than honest--even with themselves. I have often been told that a company wanted exceptional people, only to find that said company was staffed with off-the-rack mediocrities who remained after I'd moved on.

    Again, some people you don't want to work for!

    --Ray

    P.S. Interviewing is a tedious process. I've done the hiring too, and the tendency when you get 100-resumes is to whittle them down to ten possibilities, and quickly proceed from there. The point is, while you don't want your resume festooned with gimmicks, it needs to pique interest.
     
  13. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Tewwowist

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    How could anyone disagree with the opinions of Goalie and .264 here?

    Agree completely.

    Would add: Read each line of your resume and figure out how you can say the same thing with fewer words. Then do it again.
     
  14. cdmoran

    cdmoran

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    Most resumes today are scanned by machine before any HR person ever sees it. All the flash in the world will not get your resume past the machine, only having the correct keywords and phrases will. Once your resume gets past the machine and is flagged as a potential you have about 3 seconds to catch the attention of the HR person reading it, if they can't see the relevant information in that time due to lots of fancy formatting it will go straight to the circular file. HR and resumes are much different today than they were just a few years ago.

    Also a cover letter is important. I have been told many times that HR will not even consider a resume without one even though many times it will never be read.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012