Reserve Deputies?

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by KiloBravo, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. KiloBravo

    KiloBravo NRA Life Member

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    While I am continuing my fight to get to the academy right now, I decided to call up my local Sheriff's office today and ask about a reserve program. I was transferred directly to the man himself and he was VERY polite and soft spoken. Much more so than I thought he would be.

    I asked him about what I needed to do to become a reserve officer for the county I live in. He stated that I called at a great time because they are actually going to be heavily modifying the program this month. He took my name and information and stated he would be in touch sometime early next month to go over what I would need to do.

    Does anybody here have any info for me that would help out? I imagine I probably will not be getting paid for this, and that is okay with me. I just want to get my feet wet in Law Enforcement to give me a leg up on anybody else who I am competing against that may not have any prior experience.

    What type of training do they typically offer for reserves? Would I actually get to go out on calls and learn the ropes?

    I appreciate any input from anyone with experience in this field. :wavey:
     
  2. CJStudent

    CJStudent No Longer Fenced In

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    Pretty much it depends completely on the agency. Some do everything the full timers do, and some are little more than explorers. That's something you'll have to find out with the agency.
     

  3. Sundown

    Sundown

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    It varies greatly depending on which department you join. Some agencies limit reserve officers and deputies to very few things such as community events and parking enforcement while others allow reserves to patrol as a solo unit after training and an FTO period.

    The amount of training varies as well based on the state requirement for certification as well as the agency's training budget. Best way to get more info is to ask to talk with the reserve coordinator, if they have one, or schedule a ride along or two. You may even ask to attend a reserve meeting or two before you join up so you can get a feel
    for the type of folks that your future department has brought on board in the last cycle.

    The training is typically 2 nights a week an all day Saturday for several months and can be time consuming but also very, very fun. You may also be required to pay for your own training and equipment with a reimbursement by your departmen after a given time period.

    I had a blast at my reserve academy and am still very good friends with several of my classmates.
     
  4. KiloBravo

    KiloBravo NRA Life Member

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    Awesome, thanks everybody!
     
  5. whoflungdo

    whoflungdo

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    I am a reserve Deputy in Mississippi. We had to go through an academy and meet the same physical standards, same shooting standards, and testing standards as the full-time certified LEO. Ours was held at night during the week and on several Saturdays.

    The agency I work for allows their reserves to do almost everything that the full timers do except for SRT. We can and regularly do patrols, safety checkpoints, vice, narcotics, street crimes, warrants, transport and have a few specialty units that are made up of mainly, if not solely reserves. When we do patrol, we go out in pairs. The full-timers are solo. We must participate is 16 hours a month of work. We also must take a shift at 3 different events throughout the year that are basically security for events or community service details.

    Some agencies in MS pay the part time or reserves. We do not get paid where I am at now. We are certified/sworn/fully credentialed LEO. Some take it more seriously than others. Some only do community service.

    It is a great way to get into LE on your own time on your own schedule.

    Hope that helps.
     
  6. MeefZah

    MeefZah Cover is Code 3

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    What state you are in, and then what agency you join, dictates the training and what you can do.

    I was a reserve (in Ohio they are called "Special") deputy at age 19.

    Ohio requires the same academy as a full time police officer, and the agency I was at allowed us to wear the same uniform as the full timers (no rocker strip on the patches or different badges as in some Ohio offices) and work on our own, so in the eye of the public there was no distinction between a special or a full time deputy.

    We were expected to put in 16 hours a month, and there were supposed to be monthly meetings. The sheriff didn't enforce the requirements so there were a lot of guys that parked a commission there and never even worked. I worked enough for all of them, though; and I enjoyed it so much that even after I became a full time municipal cop I still did a few days a month in a county car on my own. Sadly, that ended after about a year, when we were curtailed from taking a second commission with another agency.

    Being a reserve gives you great experience and opens all kinds of doors. I highly encourage anyone, especially in a position like yours, to join up.
     
  7. razdog76

    razdog76 Heavy Mettle

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    In addition to what the others mentioned there is varying amounts of responsibility. Whether that is a benefit or bad thing depends a lot on which day of the week it is.
     
  8. KiloBravo

    KiloBravo NRA Life Member

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    That is all REALLY cool to hear. I have a very strong work ethic and being in Law Enforcement is something I have always had a dream of doing. I just recently turned 22 and am located in central PA.

    I am really excited about where this might land me. If everything works out, then I will make sure I do my best to let everyone I work with know they can count on me no matter what situation we may find ourselves in.
     
  9. MeefZah

    MeefZah Cover is Code 3

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    Hope it works out for you. That's something you gotta prove, it takes time and coming out with some regularity before the full time guys will know and trust you.
     
  10. VA27

    VA27

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    Around here reserves receive no pay and have to provide their own uniforms, firearm and leather gear. Vehicles and fuel provided by the agency. Reserve Academy is about half the length of the full academy (same curriculum, taught in half the time!), but standards (firearm quals, defensive tactics, etc) are the same.

    Reserves do everything the full time guys do except get payed.

    I've instructed in reserve academies for nearly twenty years and haven't seen very many 'bad apples' in the barrel. A guy who elects to do law enforcement for a hobby is most times as motivated as a full time guy.

    It's an inexpensive way to find out if you are cut out for LE.
     
  11. lawman800

    lawman800 Juris Glocktor

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    It just keeps getting better, don't it?
    I started out as a reserve in 1994 and here in SoCal, we have different levels of reserves depending on what you want to do. I went full-bore level 1 which lets you do everything.

    Find out what you are getting into by asking questions on training, certifications, and level of authority. Would you be the 2nd man only, allowed to run 1 man, open to special details, have the same regular updates as the full-time deputies, etc.

    Don't ask if they give you a badge on a neck chain and what types of discounts are offered. That will get you DQ'ed pretty quickly.
     
  12. KiloBravo

    KiloBravo NRA Life Member

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    :rofl:I will keep that piece of advice in mind for sure! As funny as that sounded to me, I am sure there are some knuckleheads out there who only want to be a LEO for just those reasons.
     
  13. lawman800

    lawman800 Juris Glocktor

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    It just keeps getting better, don't it?
    You'll be surprised at the questions we get in the interviews from some knuckleheads who have no idea what they want besides the badge and looking cool.
     
  14. Delon

    Delon

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    I am a reserve deputy and after FTEP we do the same job, to the same standards, as the full time guys. That means getting your paper done ontime, going to court, keeping current on case laws, policy, etc. We don't get paided unless we get called in to cover a shift, going to court, or working a detail the SO has been paided to work. Depending on where you work, being as deputy may take a slightly different mindset then working as an city officer.

    Mainly cover could be many minutes(15 plus) away as a deputy, so you really have to think about what you are doing when you dealing with people. Sucks to get into a knock down drag out fight and hear the nearest cover car in route from 20 to 30 miles away.
     
  15. KiloBravo

    KiloBravo NRA Life Member

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    Wow. That is really silly. I hope those morons get their applications and paperwork then placed into the "Round File" lol