Required To Show ATF Paperwork?

Discussion in 'GATE NFA/Class III' started by DavenBrah, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. DavenBrah

    DavenBrah

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    I went to a range to let my dad shoot my suppressed 9mm. While he was shooting a range officer came over to our lane asked to stop the shooting. He then proceeded to ask if I had the ATF paper work to prove it was mine. I then told him I didn't know I was legally obligated to show you anything. He said something along the lines "we're an FFL and are required to ask for ATF paperwork". Is there such a law?
     
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  2. mark5019

    mark5019

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  3. handloader109

    handloader109

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    Nope, bull****. Onlt in the communist states and atf.... being an ffl is an ignorant excuse for wanting to see your paperwork. Totally bull****. Ffl is for selling guns, not inspections

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  4. SilentRecon

    SilentRecon

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    Although it's a good idea to carry a downsized laminate of your tax stamp (can save you time with clueless RO's), you are in no way obligated to show them or prove your ownership. People own dozens of NFA firearms and are not going to carry around their 3 ring binders filled with stamps. Kindly tell them to go ahead and call the BATF themselves for verification. Range Officer Doofy thinks somehow you illegally came across a legitimate manufactured suppressor and decided to take it to the range with your pops. His ignorance alone is enough to pack up and never return. My suggestion is shoot at ranges where they sell NFA goodies and their presence is common. They are trained appropriately.

    I was once pulled over with an arsenal of NFA items. The officer was "shaken" at what he thought was the biggest illegal firearms bust of his Rookie career as he thought nobody could own such devices. His Superior showed up only to be a kid in a candy store. He Verified one firearm quickly and I was free to go. I let him hold some and the Rookie is now informed correctly.

    You would think this is something they teach RO's and officers in the academy but apparently not all do.

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