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Please, if you are not an electrician, do not f**k with electricity. That GFI feed that you disconnected, was protecting the floor outlet, in case someone is standing in water in your living room and they happen to encounter that receptacle. I would hope that you would correct the situation that you created, and reinstall the GFI feed to that receptacle.
 

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What I don't understand -

Sometimes you can cut the power to the ceiling light / ceiling fan by turning the switch off -

But sometimes even with the switch off the wires in the box in the ceiling are still hot.

I can understand both methods - but why have some one way - and some the other?

Maybe saves them a few $ in wire -

But it sure seems like it would be better if when you flip the switch off the power in the box at the fixture is also off.

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The living room switch box at my daughters house has 3 switches - the ceiling light, the ceiling fan and one switch that controls one side of an outlet so you can plug a floor lamp into it and control it from a switch.

I didn't work when she moved in - and I was trying to fix it -

I discovered that this switch box was getting power from 2 different circuits - one is hooked outside outlet and was on a GFI circuit.

I think I am remembering this right -

Whoever hooked it up ran a hot wire from two different circuits - one wire to each connector on a switch.

I flipped the breaker on the non GFI circuit (thinking it was the only one in that box) and one switch was still hot - I ended up just capping and taping the GFI hot wire - and used the other circuit to feed the outlet. Not sure why power to a floor outlet in a living room would be hooked into a GFI circuit -
With most Electrical contractors, it comes down to whatever is the fastest, cheapest, easiest way to install something that meets the requirements of the National Electrical code, and local codes.

Most Electrical contractors work at break neck speed. The faster and cheaper they do a job, the more money they can make. With cost of material, most will factor in reliability, because they don't want to be called back to fix something at their expense.

The hot wire in a light box depends on the shortest return path to the breaker box. Whether it is a shorter path to go to the switch box first, or shorter to go to the light box first. Less wire, less work, quicker, cheaper, meets Electrical code.

You should always be aware that electrical boxes can have more than one circuit in them.

As far as the floor box, if the original floor outlet only had a 2 wire cable to it, someone may have put it on the GFIC circuit because there is an inadequate grounding path. Something that is done with older wiring. Or some other unknown reason. Could be intentional, or just a mistake. There is also nothing wrong with something wired with a GFI, even if one is not required.
 

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While you're cutting and stripping wires, remember to never 'hold' another wire with your teeth, even for a second...
 

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Please, if you are not an electrician, do not f**k with electricity. That GFI feed that you disconnected, was protecting the floor outlet, in case someone is standing in water in your living room and they happen to encounter that receptacle. I would hope that you would correct the situation that you created, and reinstall the GFI feed to that receptacle.
Well I called it a floor outlet - but it really isn’t a floor outlet - as in located in the floor - it is in the wall a foot or so off the floor - I should have called it a lower wall outlet or wall outlet a foot off the floor instead - so that is my mistake.

I would totally agree with you (although I didn't think of it until you pointed it out) using a GFI in a floor outlet would be a good idea. I don't have any floor outlets but if I ever install one it will have GFI protection.

In this case it is no different than any wall outlet in a dry location and no reason to be GFI.
 

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Well I called it a floor outlet - but it really isn’t a floor outlet - as in located in the floor - it is in the wall a foot or so off the floor - I should have called it a lower wall outlet or wall outlet a foot off the floor instead - so that is my mistake.

I would totally agree with you (although I didn't think of it until you pointed it out) using a GFI in a floor outlet would be a good idea. I don't have any floor outlets but if I ever install one it will have GFI protection.

In this case it is no different than any wall outlet in a dry location and no reason to be GFI.
Could there be an outdoor receptacle that is fed from that wall outlet?
 

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With most Electrical contractors, it comes down to whatever is the fastest, cheapest, easiest way to install something that meets the requirements of the National Electrical code, and local codes.

Most Electrical contractors work at break neck speed. The faster and cheaper they do a job, the more money they make. With cost of material, most will factor in reliability, because they don't want to be called back to fix something at their expense.

The hot wire in a light box depends on the shortest return path to the breaker box. Whether it is a shorter path to go to the switch box first, or shorter to go to the light box first. Less wire, less work, quicker, cheaper, meets Electrical code.

You should always be aware that electrical boxes can have more than one circuit in them.

As far as the floor box, if the original floor outlet only had a 2 wire cable to it, someone may have put it on the GFIC circuit because there is an inadequate grounding path. Something that is done with older wiring. Or some other unknown reason. Could be intentional, or just a mistake. There is also nothing wrong with something wired with a GFI, even if one is not required.

I am pretty sure when the house was built they did not have this outlet hooked into GFI -

I found a few other cases where the prior owner had done things with the electrical system that were dumb and dangerous.

The one that sticks out is they replaced all the 15 amp breakers with 20 amp breakers -

So they had 20 amp breakers installed on the circuits that were using 14-gauge wire. I fixed that before they even moved in.

Plus he added a light fixture in the game room by splicing off another light - but didn't install a box - the connections with wire nuts were just laying on the sheetrock in the attic.
 
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Could there be an outdoor receptacle that is fed from that wall outlet?
There is an outside outlet that is on the GFI circuit - and so is the outside porch light.

They (the inside and outside outlet) are not on the same circuit now - the outside outlet and the half bath outlet share a GFI circuit.

I don't think the porch light at my house is on a GFI circuit - but it is at my daughter's house. I don't know what the code is - will assume it is not required to be GFI but doesn't hurt anything.
 

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The outlet on the ceiling of my garage did not have GFI protection - it was mostly used for the garage door opener - but last time I had to replace a defective GFI outlet I bought an extra one and installed it in the garage ceiling -

Not sure what the code is on an outlet in the garage - but it seems like a GFI would be required. The other outlets in the garage are on a GFI circuit. Maybe they figure you will not be using the one on the ceiling - or maybe the electricians that did my house took a shortcut.

Based off some of the other stuff I have found - the people that built my house took every shortcut they could.
 

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A spring loaded termination is typically more reliable than putting the wire under a screw.

If you do use the screw method come back 48 hours later and retighten all the screws since there will be some cold flow deformation in the wire, especially after the first time you torque it down.

This is one of the reasons to never solder dip the ends of stranded wire.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creep_(deformation)
 

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Please, if you are not an electrician, do not f**k with electricity. That GFI feed that you disconnected, was protecting the floor outlet, in case someone is standing in water in your living room and they happen to encounter that receptacle. I would hope that you would correct the situation that you created, and reinstall the GFI feed to that receptacle.
I've seen some licensed electrician do some stupid ****. Just had one catch a vacuum pump on fire by wiring it for the wrong voltage and oversizing the breaker. I have to tell licensed electrical far too often how to wire simple 3 phase motors. I've had to explain far too many times 208-240 is low voltage and 408-480 is high voltage. It's clearly printed on the data plate they just can't read apparently.

Always do your own due diligence.
 

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I just plug in a boom box and flip breakers 'til the music stops.
A boom box works well, especially if you can hear it from the breaker panel. I usually use a test light and station my wife next to it with a walker talkie.

I've made a concerted effort to label circuits over the years. Each time I change a switch or box or blow a circuit breaker the circuit gets properly labeled.

Using good components and by-the-book installation methods will pay off when the house is sold and an inspector checks the electrical system. Besides, doing the work well, without shortcuts, is a source of pride for me.
 

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Yeah, as long as it’s not an FPE panel.
Always wondeted if F.P.E. stood for "Fire Providing Electrical."

Acutuall I know this is Federal Pacific Electric.

I used to work for a company owned by Reliance Electric, who also owned FPE. FPE got exposed when Exxon bought Reliance Electric.

I took part in the retrofit of FPE industrial breakers in the 80's. My employer (Toledo Scale), had a large international service technician force who were available and competant to do the work. We all got trained how to replace breakers and doing that made up probably 10% of our workload for the next year.

Biggest one I replaced was a 5000A breaker on naval vessel.

Corporate was sweating the possiblity of having to replace all the residental breakers. Luckily for Exxon this never happened. I am sure there were house fires caused by bad FPE breakers over the years.
 

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I have never seen the bare wire and screws taped, but it seems like a good idea.
Lots of Electricians will tape around the the screws, even though it is not required, especially with a metal box. Some metal boxes don't have much side clearance, so if the receptacle mounting screws loosen up, the receptacle wire connecting screws can ground out on the side of the box.
 
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II've had to explain far too many times 208-240 is low voltage and 408-480 is high voltage. It's clearly printed on the data plate they just can't read apparently.
What catagory a voltage is in is different depending on what country you are in.

Historically in the USA these have been the volage catagory definition.

ELV - 50V or less (now divided into Class 1 and 2)
LV 51V-600V
MV 601V-69,000V ( Changed a few years ago)
HV - 69,001V-230,000V
EHV 230,001V-800,000V
UHV >800,000

ANSI Standards are different and the big change that is making its way into USA regulation is the division at 1000V.

https://www.generatorsource.com/Articles/Generator-Info/High-Medium-and-Low-Voltage-Differences.aspx

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extra-low_voltage
 

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A spring loaded termination is typically more reliable than putting the wire under a screw.

If you do use the screw method come back 48 hours later and retighten all the screws since there will be some cold flow deformation in the wire, especially after the first time you torque it down.

This is one of the reasons to never solder dip the ends of stranded wire.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creep_(deformation)
In theory, at least.

In practical experience, no.
 
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