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Our home was built using the almond colored switches and outlets.

I guess back in 1988 they were the thing - but they looked dated and ugly so I replaced them all with white after painting.

It really made a difference.
Yeah I thought about that too, but then I realized how many switches, outlets, and covers I’d need.
 

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Stick tiny screwdriver in slot to release. Wrap wire around screw clockwise when you go back.
 

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Wanna see what I've had to deal with in Montana?

View attachment 833382
I wish that I took photos of the first home that I gutted and completely remodeled. Built in 1896, it was the third of three identical homes in a row. I am pretty sure that the goober who built these had saved all of his framing and electrical scraps from the other two and used them in this one. Old steel MC would run for 6-8’ then about 6” of unclad wire meeting the next run in a giant wad of friction tape, no boxes. Some wires were twisted 4-5 twists, some were only twisted once. The entire house was run like that. Old four hole fuse box that was recessed above the kitchen doorway, one socket had obviously burned at one point, so no longer used. But additional circuits spliced into existing circuits, and one was apparently popping the fuses as it had a penny in it.

Bare wires running parellel (hot/neutral and still in service) knob to knob along the rafters and fully exposed in the attic/questionable added living space that the city was collecting property taxes for. 2 bulbs hanging from the ceiling by 2 wires that fed those bulbs with a turnkey switch on each fixture. I could go on about how that space was finished and accessed. Truly the worst stuff that I have ever seen in my career, and I have seen plenty. This was 26 years ago.


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Flipped a few houses and always use the screw terminals when possible. Only use the plug in terminal when some jack knob left a lead too short to use the screw terminals. Son in law is a journey man electrician. He never uses a plug in terminal if he can help it.
 

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I never knew that. Ours seemed to make no sense. 2 Outlets in the same room on different breakers with other outlets on the other end of the house and a floor down.
Sounds like someone added some outlets later and what was added were a new circuit. Makes me think that it was done by a homeowner/handyman/jackwagon that didn’t really know what they were doing? Perhaps the original circuits were deemed as at capacity because they kept tripping the breakers? Hard telling from here.

We all have seen stranger things I am sure. I said what I said because I have seen that as well, and the owner tried to get me to fix their electrical stuff as part of a remodel project. While I know enough to do that, I won’t do it because of license and liability.


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I need to replace some receps but i really don't like electricity. I'll wait until winter where i can turn off ALL the breakers so i know nothing is hot. I'll still test it of course...
A man has gotta know his limits.


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Never saw that before in all the houses I have lived in since childhood. I like it though.
Never saw what exactly?

Do you even know what you are talking about?
 

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Never saw that before in all the houses I have lived in since childhood. I like it though.
Never saw what???

More than one circuit in a room? A receptacle? What are you referring to that you never saw????
 

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I was taught to wrap by commercial electricians and just made it a habit for my home, plastic remodel boxed outlets. Lol
I was taught that originally as well, but Alex would squak about wasting time doing that when the boxes were plastic. So I gave him that one.

For bending conduit he doesn’t bend offsets for the transition from wall surface to the knockouts, instead applying the first conduit strap further away from the box. I still bend that offset, I think that my conduit looks neater than his because of this.


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Sounds like someone added some outlets later and what was added were a new circuit. Makes me think that it was done by a homeowner/handyman/jackwagon that didn’t really know what they were doing? Perhaps the original circuits were deemed as at capacity because they kept tripping the breakers? Hard telling from here.

We all have seen stranger things I am sure. I said what I said because I have seen that as well, and the owner tried to get me to fix their electrical stuff as part of a remodel project. While I know enough to do that, I won’t do it because of license and liability.


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Are you an Electrician?

You think every room has only one circuit?

A kitchen can have half a dozen or more.

Typically a bedroom could be on one circuit on two walls and another circuit on the other two, shared with other bedrooms, or rooms, and a different circuit for lights.
 
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Wiring described in Post #14, which you said is the "Vast Majority", thus implying not all houses are wired that way, and none of mine were.
Exactly what wiring?

Two different circuits in the same box? Receptacles with push in wiring? What??

You are not answering the question.
 

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Yeah I thought about that too, but then I realized how many switches, outlets, and covers I’d need.
Do one room at a time or per season.


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Some people claim the push the wire in is not the best way - safer to take the extra 2 minutes to use the screw on the outlet.


I used the push in the hole without any issues (20 + years ago) but when I replace a bad outlet or switch now I use the screws.


Edited:

I would look at the end of the wire - the push in the hole type can put a divot in the wire - if it has a divot and you plan to use the push in the hole method I would trim the end off with a wire cutter and if needed strip little of the insulation off. There is a gauge for the correct length of exposed wire on the outlet.
It's best to strip back the insulation so that you have enough wire to bend around the screw and then snug up that screw nice and tight.

Loose connections cause problems.
My 2 cents. I cannot stand quick connects or stab connects. I have seen many that have arced and failed. Or worse, smoldered to a point of fire hazard.

I completely rewired the house I am in now and I used all Hubble commercial grade outlets and switches. Overkill? Probably. The come with heavy duty screws and a plate that clamps down on the wire. More expensive? Yes, roughly 3x the cost of a standard residential outlet.

I am sure there are good quick connects today, but I will pass for now.
I cannot fathom why the old push in connections were ever approved in the first place. Never use them. Use the screws and be durn sure to wrap the wire in the correct direction and tighten the screw properly.

I never knew that. Ours seemed to make no sense. 2 Outlets in the same room on different breakers with other outlets on the other end of the house and a floor down.
You want at least two circuits in each room. Especially for lights. That way if one blows, you still got power to other possible light sources. Also prevents overloading a circuit in one room.
 

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Wiring described in Post #14, which you said is the "Vast Majority", thus implying not all houses are wired that way, and none of mine were.
I can't make sense out of what you are saying.

I stand by what I stated that the vast majority of houses are wired that way. There is no such thing as one circuit for each room, and only one room on a circuit. Sure someone could wire a house that way, but some rooms, like the kitchen, require quite a few different circuits. Otherwise you a not in compliance with the Electrical code.
 
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