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My 2 cents. I cannot stand quick connects or stab connects. I have seen many that have arced and failed. Or worse, smoldered to a point of fire hazard.

I completely rewired the house I am in now and I used all Hubble commercial grade outlets and switches. Overkill? Probably. The come with heavy duty screws and a plate that clamps down on the wire. More expensive? Yes, roughly 3x the cost of a standard residential outlet.

I am sure there are good quick connects today, but I will pass for now.
Buy once, cry once. I like the screw down back wire type, too. I'm pretty sure that while code still allows the back stab type, they are now limited to 14AWG, 15A circuits - they can no longer be used on #12 wire.

-Pat
 

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Take out the wires from the old receptacle? The stripped wires inserted into corresponding holes. Is my only fast option to cut, strip and reinsert into the new outlet? TIA



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Please make sure the power is off. Esp if you're soliciting advice on how to change ac receptacle
 

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Not a licensed sparky, but I have been taught how by one and have done plenty of new construction and repair work along side of a couple of licensed guys. Also have passed the homeowners exam when it was needed.

I too hate the back stab outlets and switches because I have seen them fail. So I was taught that after placing the wire loops around the respective screws to use a needle nose pliers to close the loop/pinch the loop tight so as help prevent a loose connection should a screw ever come loose. (It can happen)

And for the record, unless the box does not have an adequate whip (extra wire) it is way faster to just cut the wire there at the back of the fixture and strip a fresh length of bare copper. Fresh copper will always give you a better connection than dirty oxidized copper.

The backstab type fixtures are popular with Sparkys that only care about getting done fast to get paid, but those type don’t care about applying any more quality or doing it right than they have to. You should care more about doing things right when working on your own stuff.

Just my contribution.


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I made a mistake in my house. The wiring is really messed up. When we bought it we changed all the switches and outlets to white from the ivory color.

On one box containing a switch and outlet, I tested the outlet with a tester to make sure it was dead after turning off the breaker. I swapped it out then went to pull out the switch, touching the wires on each side. It was on. Thankfully, the electricity only went in one finger and out the other.

I learned the hard way that my house has some crazy wiring, with breakers connected to outlets and lights in a nonsensical way. I spent hours after that finding exactly what each breaker was attached to. I had to use an excel spreadsheet to print out what they were connected to (i.e. an outlet in one room, a switch in another, an outlet in another).
My house is like that also....no rhyme or reason. Just nutz.
 

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My 2 cents. I cannot stand quick connects or stab connects. I have seen many that have arced and failed. Or worse, smoldered to a point of fire hazard.

I completely rewired the house I am in now and I used all Hubble commercial grade outlets and switches. Overkill? Probably. The come with heavy duty screws and a plate that clamps down on the wire. More expensive? Yes, roughly 3x the cost of a standard residential outlet.

I am sure there are good quick connects today, but I will pass for now.
Back-stabs are NEVER to be used in a chain as they are going to have to carry the load from a spring clip, through a connector and back out the other spring clip.

I've seen back-stabs fail and smoulder in the box. They make such a small contact point that they get hot, the spring loses tension and they get hotter.

One easy way to segregate the breakers and even label them is to plug an extension cord into the receptacle you want to work on and take the female end into the breaker/service room with a test light in the end.

.......then you start snapping breakers until the test light goes out and then you can walk to wherever the receptacle is and work on it.

If you want some SERIOUSLY good receptacles and switches, buy Hospital Grade ones with the green dots on the faces.
 

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Thankfully, the electricity only went in one finger and out the other.
My electrical inspector used to check garage ceiling fixtures (they never had a bulb at that point), in a subdivision I was building, with a wet finger, essentially giving the fixture a wet willy. :)

I never knew that. Ours seemed to make no sense. 2 Outlets in the same room on different breakers with other outlets on the other end of the house and a floor down.
It seems to me that many houses have circuits wired vertically.

Please make sure the power is off. Esp if you're soliciting advice on how to change ac receptacle
I upgraded the panel in my house from 100 to 200 amps. I came home at lunch to find the electrician had disconnected the bugs on the drop while they were hot. He said you just have to watch what you touch. I scolded him, told him if I knew he was going to do that I would have unplugged my home theater.
 

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Loop the wiry clockwise around the screw. Tighten all the screws, even the ones with no wire. Wrap everything with electrical tape.

View attachment 833322
I meant to include the direction of the wire wrap in my direction, but my thumbs got ahead of my brains. Good catch.

Just me, but I always wrap my screws when the box is metal, which means always for commercial work.


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I push a small screwdriver into the slot next to the wire. That releases the spring. Many times, I just cut and re-strip.
Same here. I cut as flush to the old outlet as possible, and restrip.
 
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I meant to include the direction of the wire wrap in my direction, but my thumbs got ahead of my brains. Good catch.

Just me, but I always wrap my screws when the box is metal, which means always for commercial work.


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I was taught to wrap by commercial electricians and just made it a habit for my home, plastic remodel boxed outlets. Lol
 

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Back-stabs are NEVER to be used in a chain as they are going to have to carry the load from a spring clip, through a connector and back our the other spring clip.

I've seen back-stabs fail and smoulder in the box.

One easy way to segregate the breakers and even label them is to plug an extension cord into the receptacle you want to work on and take the female end into the breaker/service room with a test light in the end.

.......then you start snapping breakers until the test light goes out and then you can walk to wherever the receptacle is and work on it.
I made a dead short switch using an HD switch and an exterior (plastic) box and face plate with a 5-6’ length of a male 12G extension cord end from a damaged extension cord. I find that it is fast, easy, and foolproof way to identify and shut off that circuit. I still verify that the power is off with a tic or plug in tester.


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Make sure the bare ground wire does not contact the white neutral wire screw when you insert the receptacle into the box. It is easy to screw up if you are not aware of it. When you plug in a load you will energize the metal cases of things like kitchen appliances and someone can get a bad shock if they are grounded by the sink for example. I was installing a copper fuel oil line for a guy once and got shocked because the metal furnace case was energized from the room light. He did not put it on a dedicated circuit and the bare ground wire of the overhead room light was touching the neutral so about 1 amp was going thru the ground wire to the furnace, oil pump, and copper fuel line and finally me to the earth. Just lucky it was a light and more amps were not on the circuit. When I went outside and grabbed the fuel line to connect the tank I completed the path to ground and got zapped. I have seen an awful lot of houses that have voltage on the ground wires because switches, outlets, and light fixtures were not installed properly. Screw this up on several different circuits and you can get a lot of amps going thru your ground rod instead of back on the neutral like it should. It is easy to do and I would bet if many here would test for it they would find they have voltage on the ground wires of one or more of their circuits.
 

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I made a dead short switch using an HD switch and an exterior (plastic) box and face plate with a 5-6’ length of a male 12G extension cord end from a damaged extension cord. I find that it is fast, easy, and foolproof way to identify and shut off that circuit. I still verify that the power is off with a tic or plug in tester.


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Yeah, as long as it’s not an FPE panel.
 

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Or the commercial/industrial grade type, where you insert the wire, and tightening the screw clamps down against the wire. These are even better than the wrap the wire around the screw type.

I am a retired Electrician, and hate those spring tension push in types.

The commercial/industrial type are maybe $3.50 to $ 4.50, vs 75 cents for the push in type. But you will most likely never have any trouble with the more expensive type. If given a choice, that is all I would ever install.
I agree, I have had the wires fall right out of the push in plug and I have had the wrap around get loose. I use the spec grade and tighten the crap out of them. They generally have a screw that will take a square drive bit also so you don't have to mess with that flat head nonsense. They also have a metal strap on the back so they are physically stronger.
 

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Yeah, as long as it’s not an FPE panel.
I listen for the breaker popping. Am very aware of the danger of FPE panels.


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