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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Wow 110 posts... thanks everyone! I am still alive!

Take out the wires from the old receptacle? The stripped wires inserted into corresponding holes. Is my only fast option to cut, strip and reinsert into the new outlet? TIA



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I push a small screwdriver into the slot next to the wire. That releases the spring. Many times, I just cut and re-strip.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok thanks guys. Going to looks for a tiny screwdriver


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Some people claim the push the wire in is not the best way - safer to take the extra 2 minutes to use the screw on the outlet.


I used the push in the hole without any issues (20 + years ago) but when I replace a bad outlet or switch now I use the screws.


Edited:

I would look at the end of the wire - the push in the hole type can put a divot in the wire - if it has a divot and you plan to use the push in the hole method I would trim the end off with a wire cutter and if needed strip little of the insulation off. There is a gauge for the correct length of exposed wire on the outlet.
 

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YES. LET's NOT FORGET STEP 2.

Just sayin...


Measure voltage on the breaker to verify power is on. Trip the appropriate breaker and observe that power has been removed. Swap the receptacles. Reset the breaker.
 
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Our home was built using the almond colored switches and outlets.

I guess back in 1988 they were the thing - but they looked dated and ugly so I replaced them all with white after painting.

It really made a difference.
 

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Some people claim the push the wire in is not the best way - safer to take the extra 2 minutes to use the screw on the outlet.


I used the push in the hole without any issues (20 + years ago) but when I replace a bad outlet or switch now I use the screws.
It's best to strip back the insulation so that you have enough wire to bend around the screw and then snug up that screw nice and tight.

Loose connections cause problems.
 

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It'sbest to strip back tfeh insulation so that you have enough wire to bend around the screw and then snug up that screw nice and tight.

Loose connections cause problems.
Or the commercial/industrial grade type, where you insert the wire, and tightening the screw clamps down against the wire. These are even better than the wrap the wire around the screw type.

I am a retired Electrician, and hate those spring tension push in types.

The commercial/industrial type are maybe $3.50 to $ 4.50, vs 75 cents for the push in type. But you will most likely never have any trouble with the more expensive type. If given a choice, that is all I would ever install.
 

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It'sbest to strip back tfeh insulation so that you have enough wire to bend around the screw and then snug up that screw nice and tight.

Loose connections cause problems.

I agree - but I have never had a push in fail - and oddly enough - I had the power go out in my master bathroom.

Like a breaker was tripped - I couldn’t figure it out -

I finally took my wife’s blow dryer and started checking every outlet on that circuit.

The one in the garage had a hot wire come loose from the outlet- it was attached with the screw.

I figured when the house was built whoever installed this outlet did not tighten it.
 

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Measure voltage on the breaker to verify power is on. Trip the appropriate breaker and observe that power has been removed. Swap the receptacles. Reset the breaker.
I made a mistake in my house. The wiring is really messed up. When we bought it we changed all the switches and outlets to white from the ivory color.

On one box containing a switch and outlet, I tested the outlet with a tester to make sure it was dead after turning off the breaker. I swapped it out then went to pull out the switch, touching the wires on each side. It was on. Thankfully, the electricity only went in one finger and out the other.

I learned the hard way that my house has some crazy wiring, with breakers connected to outlets and lights in a nonsensical way. I spent hours after that finding exactly what each breaker was attached to. I had to use an excel spreadsheet to print out what they were connected to (i.e. an outlet in one room, a switch in another, an outlet in another).
 
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Or the commercial/industrial grade type, where you insert the wire, and tightening the screw clamps down against the wire. These are even better than the wrap the wire around the screw type.

I am a retired Electrician, and hate those spring tension push in types.

The commercial/industrial type are maybe $3.50 to $ 4.50, vs 75 cents for the push in type. But you will most likely never have any trouble with the more expensive type. If given a choice, that is all I would ever install.
I wish I would’ve known those existed when I replaced mine. When you buy a dozen or more at a time you can get a pretty good deal on a contractor pack.
 

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I made a mistake in my house. The wiring is really messed up. When we bought it we changed all the switches and outlets to white from the ivory color.

On one box containing a switch and outlet, I tested the outlet with a tester to make sure it was dead after turning off the breaker. I swapped it out then went to pull out the switch, touching the wires on each side. It was on. Thankfully, the electricity only went in one finger and out the other.

I learned the hard way that my house has some crazy wiring, with breakers connected to outlets and lights in a nonsensical way. I spent hours after that finding exactly what each breaker was attached to. I had to use an excel spreadsheet to print out what they were connected to (i.e. an outlet in one room, a switch in another, an outlet in another).
The vast majority of houses are wired like that.
 

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My 2 cents. I cannot stand quick connects or stab connects. I have seen many that have arced and failed. Or worse, smoldered to a point of fire hazard.

I completely rewired the house I am in now and I used all Hubble commercial grade outlets and switches. Overkill? Probably. The come with heavy duty screws and a plate that clamps down on the wire. More expensive? Yes, roughly 3x the cost of a standard residential outlet.

I am sure there are good quick connects today, but I will pass for now.
 

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The vast majority of houses are wired like that.
I never knew that. Ours seemed to make no sense. 2 Outlets in the same room on different breakers with other outlets on the other end of the house and a floor down.
 

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I need to replace some receps but i really don't like electricity. I'll wait until winter where i can turn off ALL the breakers so i know nothing is hot. I'll still test it of course...
 
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