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Native Mainiac
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Well, here is a good example of "Boyle's Law".

If you heat up a closed container....things expand. Keep it from burnng, but warm enough to get that specific heat.

Every spring I paddle around the shore and usually pick up several soccer and basket balls in the coves and nooks about the lake.

It was EPIC when it popped.....but not much warning. Upper left side....
Basket Ball Fire.jpg
 

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Mentally Frozen
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Bigfoot probably didn't like that.
 

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M62/76
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I’d remember it if FC had been my physics teacher!
 
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My high school physics teacher was out for several months after a bicycling accident. One of our lessons was figuring out at what force he struck the tree.
Brutal. But probably a good challenging excersize. I can think of a couple of real world applications.


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Philippians 4: 6-7
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Physics......Wait, What?
 

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Brutal. But probably a good challenging excersize. I can think of a couple of real world applications.


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He had a good sense of humor.
 

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My physics teacher was probably the third smartest person I have ever known and really, really strange!
 

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This used to be AMERICA........
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............................and NO DOLLAR BILL for scale. ..........
Nice effort,,......:drool:
 

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Didn’t take physics. Took astronomy, anatomy and physiology, chemistry.

Astronomy had been an interest ever since. The A&P class has been the most useful over the years. But Chemistry was by far the most fun. He was an old chemist who started teaching after he retired from industry. The EXPLOSIVES INDUSTRY.

All you had to do to distract him was to raise your hand and say “Dr. S. Was that a nitrate or a nitrite?” And it was off to the races. We could make explosives in class and test them on the baseball field.
 

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Didn’t take physics. Took astronomy, anatomy and physiology, chemistry.

Astronomy had been an interest ever since. The A&P class has been the most useful over the years. But Chemistry was by far the most fun. He was an old chemist who started teaching after he retired from industry. The EXPLOSIVES INDUSTRY.

All you had to do to distract him was to raise your hand and say “Dr. S. Was that a nitrate or a nitrite?” And it was off to the races. We could make explosives in class and test them on the baseball field.
I would have enjoyed his class.


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Didn’t take physics. Took astronomy, anatomy and physiology, chemistry.

Astronomy had been an interest ever since. The A&P class has been the most useful over the years. But Chemistry was by far the most fun. He was an old chemist who started teaching after he retired from industry. The EXPLOSIVES INDUSTRY.

All you had to do to distract him was to raise your hand and say “Dr. S. Was that a nitrate or a nitrite?” And it was off to the races. We could make explosives in class and test them on the baseball field.
Red phosphorus and potassium chlorate is a rather energetic combination.
 

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High school physics was one of the the best classes I ever took. The teacher was very good, and helped author the lab manual we used.

The worst HS class I ever took was Latin. It was supposed to help me with English, proving that advisor sucked pond scum--as did the Latin teacher. But, I lucked out with a good professor my freshman year at college in a course--I don't remember exactly--in English, or composition, or whatever. It helped me become the wordsmith I am today. As you all can tell. LOL.

My second best HS class was Chemistry. The teacher was fresh out of college and a cool guy. He showed us how to make contact explosives--NI3. I volunteer as a lab helper, which allowed me access to the chemical storage area. I may or may not have obtained a small quantity of elemental iodine to pursue further studies. I may or may not have had a batch of the wet compound--which is supposed to be relatively stable when wet--blow up in my face. The best part was the mini-explosions that went off randomly in my hair as tiny amount began to dry. (The stuff is so unstable when dry that alpha particles can detonate it)

Best use of this knowledge was years later when, as a science teacher, I had my own supply of iodine crystals. Packing wet NI3 in the principal's office door keyhole in the evening ensured him of a surprise in the morning.

 
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