Reloads?

Discussion in 'Caliber Corner' started by Fortycal, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. Fortycal

    Fortycal

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    Looking for the pros and cons regarding reloads for my Glock.
     
  2. N/Apower

    N/Apower

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    Same as any other pistol except that Glocks tend to like full-power loads a little more than more physically rigid platforms, and polygonal bores don't like lead.
     

  3. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Probably would get a better answer to this in the reloading forum... However, it's just as safe to reload for a Glock, as any other weapon. Lead must be used w/ caution on Glocks, due to the rifling. If you use jacketed or plated bullets, this isn't a concern.

    IGF
     
  4. Snapper2

    Snapper2

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    It's sort of like eating out. Theres good and bad places to eat. But trusting the wrong reloader can get you an Oh Sh... quicker than if you had to run to a bathroom for food poison:whistling: You have no idea how many times brass has been used unless you roll your own.
     
  5. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    If the OP is talking about buying reloads.. you'd be nuts to do that. You have no idea what kind of quality control measures the person loading the ammo uses. If you're going from one of the big "commercial reloaders"(DoubleTapp, Georgia Arms, etc.)... then its not such a big deal. If you're talking about buying reloads at a gun show, no way would I do that.

    IGF
     
  6. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

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    I will not encourage you to shoot lead through your FB. That being said. I have shot tons of home rolled lead loads throught the FB. I have had excellent groups out to 100yds, and even in our long range shooting here on the ranch, we have shot some stuff (playing) out to 3/400 yds as well with the factory barrel. The after market barrel is wise because it does have a more fully supported chamber area, and is better for using lead bullets and gives you more loads per piece of brass.

    Plated and jacketed bullets have all done real well for me out of the FB, the jacketed you can take to faster Vels, than you can the plated.... (understand some of this depends on caliber and what your doing). I say this becuse ina 45acp for example, there is NO NEED to bump up the speed, and plated 45's at 830/850fps have been for me 'very accurate.' Now n my 10mm, I use jacketed or lead, so I can get max vel out of them.

    As for acurracy. You will gain a tad with the AB over the FB, but in my excperience, It is not much to write home about. There is a small advantage, yes. But just not that awful much IMO.

    If you choose to shoot lead in the FB, i will give you some sound wisdom. Clean that barrel out every 40/50 rounds, and use a bullet with a BHN (hardness) of at least 18/21. 20/21 being the best I've seen for keeping the FB the cleanest, BUT I still srongly suggest you clean every 30/40/50 max shots. Pressure can build very fast, and nasty things can happen. DO NOT let that scare you off using the FB with lead. Just keep watching and keep it real clean and very often. Some guys say.."Man I shot tons through the FB with no cleaning in between.." Great. They will learn one day when the gun blows up !

    Bottom line:

    FB is fine, and has been for me out to 100 yds for deer with a hardcast bullet or a heavy XTP. For "play time in the canyons," when we get frisky and want to "shoot the rock by the log by the stump thing" at long ranges. If you can see it. You can hit it if you know how..... ;)

    AB is better for the brass life, and safety issues...

    Use jacketed for full power, and plated for plinkers in FB. Even in the AB, do not load up hot with a plated bullet. Many do, but there again, one day they may have some big trouble if the jacket trys to shed, besides they (plated) are not that accurate in a full house load anyway, and do not crimp them to much or they mash the bullet, and it is some what deformed to a small degree before it even leaves the barrel.


    HTH's


    Good shooting



    CanyonMan
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2010
  7. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

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    Yea, amen to the "Do not buy reloads from ANYONE."

    I was not sure if this is the OP's concern or If he reloads, so I adressed (as good as I could) for now, the "he reloads possiblility."



    CanyonMan
     
  8. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy

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    Use care. Some folks shoot lead and some don't. Plated and jacketed are good for sure. Between mid to max seems to work best for me.
     
  9. vafish

    vafish

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    Pros to reloading:

    1. Ammo is cheaper, you won't save any money but you will shoot more for the same amount. I just reloaded a bunch of .44 mag yesterday, 240 gr JHP's were about 1/5th the cost of factory ammo. But where I normally would have bought 1 box of factory ammo I loaded 5+ boxes for the same amount of money. I loaded a bunch of .38 special with bullets I cast from scrap lead this past weekend that was marginally more expensive then .22LR (about 3.5 cents per round).

    2. You can make the ammo exactly the way you want it from light "mouse fart" to full power loads.

    3. You know exactly the quality control that was put into making the ammo, because you did it. (this might be a bad thing as well)

    Con's to reloading:

    1. No one to blame but yourself if your gun blows up.

    2. You'll spend a lot of money on equipment as you upgrade to various presses.

    3. You'll spend a lot of time in your reloading room (that could be a good thing if it keeps you out of trouble elsewhere)