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Reloading manuals

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by area52, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. WeeWilly

    WeeWilly

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    I agree, even results from day to day with everything the exact same can change for a number of reasons.

    Notwithstanding all of the foregoing in this thread, I have never used a published load from any source where if I stuck with the start load levels in my first shots, I had anything close to "pressure signs". I have had some where I couldn't get to the published max before I started seeing pressure signs, but the only disappointment in using start loads in countless loads tested was under pressure, which is only time lost.

    I have a friend who has been loading for maybe 50 years, who always uses max loads, period. He has loaded for maybe a hundred of different calibers over that time and never broke a gun. I personally don't do that as I have found most times something less than max will actually work better, but I think the "safety" aspect is highly overstated.

    I believe like most things in life (maybe including SD gun use), people worry about the wrong things when it comes to reloading. In my opinion, kabooms don't happen from using "bad" load data in a published manual, or even starting at max charge in that published source (not recommending this, just saying it is the wrong thing to focus on).

    Just thought maybe starting Monday off with something a little controversial might be in order. ;)
     
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  2. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    What am I supposed to be looking at here? I only see each powder listed in one row per powder, with a different grains in each column.
     

  3. Glock Commander

    Glock Commander

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    I had a variety of manuals but my favorite is Speer.
     
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  4. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Personally, I never use starting data, rifle or pistol, but for light pistol gamer loads. It rarely gives the desired result. I use average middle data. This is also what I teach. Starting data may be safer but you end up at midrange & beyond most of the time, especially in rifle loads.
    Book max is very nebulous, just look at 3-4 diff manuals & their book max, all over the place. I attribute this to test platforms & conditions. Book max should always be approached carefully & using a chrono will guide you. If you are getting vel well past the book, you need to slow down & pay attention. There are no free lunches when it comes to vel vs pressures. There are so many variables in any firearm, that duplicating results, even using identical components is just rarely going to happen, more luck than design.
     
  5. dudel

    dudel

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    Which means you still need to know what you're doing, even when using the manuals. Typos can still happen.
     
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  6. jmorris

    jmorris

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    Winchester 296 and H110 are the same powder, just sold under two different labels.

    Same as HP-38 and Winchester 231.
     
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  7. hogfish

    hogfish Señor Member

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    I want to say I've seen different min/max loads for same bullet in same load book with 296 vs. 110. I may not be remembering correctly, though.
     
  8. jmorris

    jmorris

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    You might be thinking about post #33 of this thread. ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2017
  9. hogfish

    hogfish Señor Member

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    Well, that sure is an example right there. Is that what you were referring to? I remember skimming over it and wondering what you were talking about. :)
     
  10. DWB57

    DWB57

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    If I read this right your saying they are the same powders your right but back in the day you are referring to they were different w-296/h-110,I could be wrong but I'm pretty sure they was not the same back then.
     
  11. SCmasterblaster

    SCmasterblaster G17 carrier since 1989 Millennium Member

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    As for me at age 61, I rely on the reload labels on ammo boxes.
     
  12. Turn4811

    Turn4811

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    I have a few version of the Lyman, a Speer, and a Hornady. They all are starting to get dated except for my newest Lyman.

    I have relied on the powder manufacturers recommended loads and cross referenced with the Speer and Lyman for any new loads. The Hornady has my 44 Mag loads which haven't changed in 15 years.
     
  13. WeeWilly

    WeeWilly

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    They were always the same powder, from the same facility, just different labels and ballistician's recording results over the years.
     
  14. jmorris

    jmorris

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    St. Marks has always made the powder, things have changed down the line since day 1 but they have always been the same. At least as close as they can repeat from lot to lot.
     
  15. DWB57

    DWB57

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    Sorry my bad info was not as easy as it is these days and the data was always different lol when looking at loading manuals. I still have loading manuals that I bought back in the seventies.
     
  16. weaselfire

    weaselfire

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    Absolutely.

    Jeff

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
     
  17. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Data was diff back in the day when they were not made by the same plant. Just like W231 & HP38 were slightly diff. Some will say it was just diff lots, but the data points were diff 20yrs ago. The chronograph doesn't lie.
     
  18. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    I'm a big fan of Loadbooks... Just keep in mind.. it's just a book of data. You're not going to learn anything about reloading like you might in the Lyman or the Lee.

    I've got a Lyman 49 but I've not opened it in ages.
     
  19. CDR_Glock

    CDR_Glock

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    Since I load some less common calibers (500 S&W, 454 Casull and 460), I need each one since each different book has limited loading data. I have Hornady, Lyman, and Speer. Barnes doesn't keep data on my Magnum revolver cartridges.

    There are websites that list loads but it's best to cross reference with other sources, as a typographical error can be catastrophic.


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