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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been trying to find load data for 230 grain XTP hp to shoot out of my XDS .45 acp.

Does anyone know if there is any load data for the short barrel and if it would make a difference? Can anyone supply a link for such data?

I am cleaning up my area and came across a small pile of slugs and figured I would load them up specific to my Springfield. Thank you.
Elwood
 

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Loading for short bbl 45acp is no diff than 4"-5" bbls. Factory short bbl loads usually have a diff designed jhp for expansion at lower vel. With xtp, you wont likely get much exp under 800fps. Use any powder faster than AA#7, good to go.
 

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Whatever load develops the most velocity in a long barrel will develop the most velocity in a short barrel. And you will need a chronograph to determine the velocity out of your gun.

A popular misconception is that faster burning powders will develop full velocities sooner so they should work better in shorter barrels. Some ammo manufacturers have developed "Short Barrel" loads but they're just high efficiency loads that will develop more velocity in longer barrels as well as short barrels and in some cases it's the bullet weight that has been optimized for short barrels rather than the type of powder that is used.

When Speer developed their plus+P short barrel 38 special load the dialed in the projectile wight to 135 grains but Speer's Gold dot 45 ACP short barrel load uses the 230 grain bullet

But slower burning powders develop more velocity for the same amount of pressure as faster burning powders and barrel length makes less difference than the velocity the load is capable of generating.

And shorter barrels will develop less velocity than a longer one regardless of the load. The basic rule of thumb is a +- 50 fps difference per inch of barrel which pretty much holds true except that individual barrels can vary as much as 50 fps or more for the same length barrel due to microscope differences in forcing cone dimensions, bore diameter and barrel smoothness. Custom barrel makers air-gauge their barrels to measure internal volume which is more accurate than measuring bore diameter. And tighter bores generally give higher velocities.

You can never know if your gun has a fast barrel or a slow barrel until you chronograph it and compare results with the same load in another similar gun.
 

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Whatever load develops the most velocity in a long barrel will develop the most velocity in a short barrel. And you will need a chronograph to determine the velocity out of your gun.

A popular misconception is that faster burning powders will develop full velocities sooner so they should work better in shorter barrels. Some ammo manufacturers have developed "Short Barrel" loads but they're just high efficiency loads that will develop more velocity in longer barrels as well as short barrels and in some cases it's the bullet weight that has been optimized for short barrels rather than the type of powder that is used.

When Speer developed their plus+P short barrel 38 special load the dialed in the projectile wight to 135 grains but Speer's Gold dot 45 ACP short barrel load uses the 230 grain bullet

But slower burning powders develop more velocity for the same amount of pressure as faster burning powders and barrel length makes less difference than the velocity the load is capable of generating.

And shorter barrels will develop less velocity than a longer one regardless of the load. The basic rule of thumb is a +- 50 fps difference per inch of barrel which pretty much holds true except that individual barrels can vary as much as 50 fps or more for the same length barrel due to microscope differences in forcing cone dimensions, bore diameter and barrel smoothness. Custom barrel makers air-gauge their barrels to measure internal volume which is more accurate than measuring bore diameter. And tighter bores generally give higher velocities.

You can never know if your gun has a fast barrel or a slow barrel until you chronograph it and compare results with the same load in another similar gun.
Agree to a point. Yes slower powders always gve higher vel, but optimizing the load using a faster powder can get you close with less blast & flash, cheaper too. Vel gain/loss varies a lot with powder burn rate. So 50fps per inch maybe with slower powders. When you get to faster powders, the diff can easily be half that per inch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You guys have a knack for typing your thoughts where we all can understand them.
Thank you very much for the explanation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you found a load that you've tried yet? Just asking as I've got the XDS w/3.3" barrel and want to use up some Speer 230 grain JHPs that I've got here.
Hornady American Gunner 185 XTPs and a variety of my handloads.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Have you found a load that you've tried yet? Just asking as I've got the XDS w/3.3" barrel and want to use up some Speer 230 grain JHPs that I've got here.
I apologize for not giving you a full answer the other day. I have been using a 185 grain hp over 9 grains of AA5.

Another is around 5.5 gr 231 under a 185 gr jacketed swc. I didn't write this last recipe down so it's approximate but it shoots nice out of the short barrel.
 
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