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Diva extraordinaire
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t two of us have pointed out. That's why there are only one or two companies that mIndustry wide they are considered a bad idea and for very good reasons that at leasake them. I've dived cattle boats as a DM from 2007-2012 and very few divers are using them or Poseidon regs for that matter. It's not common place and they are a liability. Best of luck to your dive buddy.
Before they started using rebreathers, Poseidon regulators were the choice of Navy SEALS. They are still very popular with deep wreck divers because they are so reliable.
Mine was a hand me down and is older than me. I have never had a single problem with it.



The Poseidon regulators are good - just finding a knowledgeable tech can be a problem. I used to service them, but lost my certification a long time ago.
That is the only drawback. If you need service, you have to find an authorized Poseidon service center. My local dive shop won't touch mine, I have to take it to Orlando. There is also a very good Poseidon repair tech in Key Largo. He told me the Poseidon design is so good that it hasn't changed since they invented it.
 

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Diva extraordinaire
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Before they started using rebreathers, Poseidon regulators were the choice of Navy SEALS. They are still very popular with deep wreck divers because they are so reliable.
Mine was a hand me down and is older than me. I have never had a single problem with it.




That is the only drawback. If you need service, you have to find an authorized Poseidon service center. My local dive shop won't touch mine, I have to take it to Orlando. There is also a very good Poseidon repair tech in Key Largo. He told me the Poseidon design is so good that it hasn't changed since they invented it.
They Navy used them in a very niche role. Primarily cold water operations a long time ago
 

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Diva extraordinaire
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They Navy used them in a very niche role. Primarily cold water operations a long time ago
I know as a fact that they were the regulator of choice for SEALS. That comes straight from a SEAL I know. Now they use rebreathers ("no bubbles, no troubles" they like to say).
 

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I know as a fact that they were the regulator of choice for SEALS. That comes straight from a SEAL I know. Now they use rebreathers ("no bubbles, no troubles" they like to say).
They still use open circuit as much as they do closed circuit and they aren't using hokey miss matched "safe seconds" with antique regulators. Use at you and your buddy's peril. I'll leave it at that.
 

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They still use open circuit as much as they do closed circuit and they aren't using hokey miss matched "safe seconds" with antique regulators. Use at you and your buddy's peril. I'll leave it at that.
I have used several different regulators and none of them breathes as easily as my Poseidon. Another thing the Poseidon tech in Key Largo told me is that the older Cyklon 2nd stages (like mine) are in great demand because they are made of metal, not plastic like the newer ones.
Like any equipment, it has to be maintained. Especially if your life depends on it. I take good care of my gear, and have it checked frequently. Any questionable part is replaced. For example, I had the rubber diaphragm replaced with a newer silicone one even though there was nothing wrong with the old one.
 

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I know as a fact that they were the regulator of choice for SEALS. That comes straight from a SEAL I know. Now they use rebreathers ("no bubbles, no troubles" they like to say).
Rebreathers have very limited applications. Draegers are generally limited to about 30 feet, although you can do a short excursion down to about 50.
 
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Rebreathers have very limited applications. Draegers are generally limited to about 30 feet, although you can do a short excursion down to about 50.
Today we have mixed gas rebreathers that aren't limited by depth.
 
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Cool!
I haven't played at this in over 20 years.

We are using straight O2 and air diluent that is mixed either manually or automatically at what ever ppO2 set point the diver wants to run. We can change that mix on the fly to reduce O2 due to depth or add to it to reduce decompression times. It used to be the big leagues but it's becoming more and more mainstream for even the recreational diver.
 
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Discussion Starter #72

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Discussion Starter #73
You would think that between two small towns and several business you could find a regulator! The young lady I talked to at the Coop said they had a regulator and she was right. Only thing it is a 10 pound regulator for a turkey fryer. That should cook a burger!
 

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You would think that between two small towns and several business you could find a regulator! The young lady I talked to at the Coop said they had a regulator and she was right. Only thing it is a 10 pound regulator for a turkey fryer. That should cook a burger!

Can you pull a stock or model number off of it and order it online? As much as it's nice to support the local community, when they don't have it they don't have it...
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Can you pull a stock or model number off of it and order it online? As much as it's nice to support the local community, when they don't have it they don't have it...
I have another small town near by and if nothing pans out there I can get one from Amazon for 10-12 bucks.
 

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I have another small town near by and if nothing pans out there I can get one from Amazon for 10-12 bucks.

You are far more dedicated to brick and mortar than I sir... If the store I purchased an item through doesn't carry parts, or services it, I feel no compunction to waste gas nor time in replacing said parts as I'll do it at my convenience. Hope you find what you are looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter #79
You are far more dedicated to brick and mortar than I sir... If the store I purchased an item through doesn't carry parts, or services it, I feel no compunction to waste gas nor time in replacing said parts as I'll do it at my convenience. Hope you find what you are looking for.
The Holland grill series went out of production/business several years ago. I need to go to the Pharmacy and grocery store in this other town so it isn't all that out of my way.


Yeah! Wanna ride bikes??!!

?????



:D
 

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You should turn the burner off first - then shut off the tank.

You may have tripped the the excess flow valve built into your regulator.

The regulator is more than likely not bad - just needs to be reset.
Spot on!

Ever since I bought this grill I have shut it down by first shutting of the tank, then the burner and never a problem until the other day. I'm thinking that I forgot to shut off the burner the last time I used the grill.

Edited to add: I ended up doing the reset twice to get it to light properly. There are times the regulator has a a high pitch hum.
I've been in the energy industry for over two decades, including propane, and I can suggest that shutting the tank valve while the burner valves are still open allows the pressure in entire system downstream from the now closed tank valve to drop to atmospheric pressure. If you close the burner valves now, the line pressure is still at atmospheric.

When you want to grill a few days later and open the tank valve, even if the burner valves are closed the inrush of propane as it repressurizes the system may trigger the EFV. Some are just more sensitive than others. There is also an EFV in the OPD tank valve assembly, so there are two chances to trip an EFV.

One trick to reduce the chances of triggering an EFV is, in addition to closing the burner valves first to maintain some pressure in the line, is to open the tank valve very slowly to slow down the inrush of gas. One thing I often do is open the tank valve to pressurize the line, close the valve to reset the EFV in case it tripped, (but at least there'll be pressure in the line), then reopen the tank valve. You'll be grilling minutes later.
 
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