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Recoil Springs change for Glock 23 's

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Haycreek, Jul 6, 2002.

  1. Haycreek

    Haycreek

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    As you may know, the Glock 19 and Glock 23 handguns share the same recoil springs. It seems to me that the stock G 23 recoil springs may be too light. When the G 23 is changed to a 22 # spring, the recoil is not as "sharp". My question is : will a change to a 22# spring lessen the possibility of "firing out of battery?"
     
  2. fastbolt

    fastbolt

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    Either you might get very few answers, or this thread will run on forever ...

    IF ... your pistol was failing to easily go forward into full battery because the previous recoil spring was weakening ... then, yes, a stronger recoil spring will restore it to normal function.

    I know that's not what you asked ... but the conditions under which a pistol slide & barrel fails to return to full battery, and possibly fires while out-of-battery, may involve more than just the strength of the recoil spring. Tolerance stackup, improperly sized ammunition, fouling or debris in the wrong place at the wrong time, broken or damaged parts of the pistol, improper maintenance, unexpected pressure against the front of the barrel & slide ... are some of the other things that can affect a pistol and may lead to conditions where it might not go into battery.

    Many shooters, myself included, select stronger recoil springs in different pistols to ... lessen wear on the pistol from "battering", reduce the perceived recoil impulse, enhance the movement of the slide during counter-recoil travel, help chamber rounds when the chamber is a little "dirty" from extended firing, or the slide rails may be accumulating debris ... things of that nature.

    In striker fired pistols like the Glock, you want a recoil spring to be in good health to help prevent the striker spring from pulling the slide out of battery when the trigger is pulled. This is why you want to consider replacing the recoil spring whenever you replace the striker spring, to avoid a situation where the striker spring is "stronger" than the recoil spring, relatively speaking ... It's a little sobering to start pulling the trigger, and catch the movement of the slide being pulled slightly to the rear. Paying attention to the condition of your pistol during normal cleaning and maintenance can help prevent this, in that you can notice as springs are starting to weaken.

    The potential downside ... heavier recoil springs may exacerbate a shooter's tendency to "short cycle" the pistol. If it "robs" (or absorbs) a little more of the recoil impulse, and your grip isn't solid enough to prevent the frame from moving, which may "rob" more of the recoil impulse, you may experience a "limp wrist" malfunction.

    Another consideration is that standard magazine springs may lack the strength to keep the last couple of rounds lifted upward fast enough to feed reliably in some people's pistols after they step up a bit in recoil spring strength. This is because faster cycling, shorter slides may move faster than the magazine springs can feed the last couple of rounds upward against the magazine lips under recoil, which is when the spring is at its weakest since it's almost fully decompressed.

    This doesn't happen to everyone who uses a heavier recoil spring, but it happens often enough that at least one aftermarket spring maker started recommending replacing the magazine springs when people called in to order the stainless steel guiderods & springs to replace the Glock captured polymer guide rod & spring assembly.

    Also, depending on your relative grip strength and wrist support during recoil, some shooters notice the empty cases fly more rearward with the heavier springs. A slightly less-than-adequate grip and locked wrist might not cause a malfunction, but it might now throw an empty case in your face.

    If WalterGa doesn't see this thread and join in, send him a message. I think I read where he uses similar increased strength springs in his pistols, so he can give you feed back. Besides, his answers are generally much shorter!

    Glock would probably tell you they've installed the spring they believe is best for the pistol. They might consider it a little presumptious of someone else to definitely tell you simply replacing the recoil spring will help prevent a problem Glock probably wouldn't acknowledge as even being likely in a well maintained pistol.

    Sorry if I ran on too long ...
     

  3. Haycreek

    Haycreek

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    Thanks for an excellent reply fastbolt.Your points are well taken, I plan to replace the g 23 recoil spring and guiderod, and it just doesnt make sense to me to replace the originl spring with one of the same strength of a G 19.
     
  4. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

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    Hay,

    It depends.

    The Wolff 22 and 24 lb springs for the G23 actually INCREASE the likelihood of firing out of battery, as they produce less force during lock up than the stock spring once they take their initial set. I had several slightly out of battery firings with this set up. It does not seem to be true in the larger framed pistols, however.

    This is not so with the ISMI 22 lb spring. It has more force at lock up than the stock G23 spring.

    Koski
     
  5. fastbolt

    fastbolt

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    It doesn't necessarily work to second guess the engineers that actually designed and then developed the spring weight calibrations ... Not all the time anyway.

    For example, if it makes you feel any better ... The Ruger P-90 .45 uses the same recoil spring as the P-89 9mm. How's that for a weird bit of trivia? It's rated at 11 pounds, as measured by one method. And Ruger doesn't seem to care if you use +P ammunition in their pistols, so it doesn't seem to be a borderline spring for standard .45 rounds ...

    Now, Wolff offers 13, 14 & 16 pound increased springs ... if you're so inclined. Personally, I'm now using the 16 pound weight ...