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Recoil guide rod

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by bear_1, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. bear_1

    bear_1

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    hello, everyone i have been shooting my g26 for about two yrs now and it has been flawless until i decided to change out my recoil spring and went to a stainless steel one i had a couple of fte's does the spring have to wear a little or is the ammo, rem. 115gr. please advise
     
  2. voyager4520

    voyager4520 -----

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    It could be the ammo. Remington 115gr is some of the weakest ammo out there.

    You could try running a lightly oiled patch between the spring coils on the guide rod. Then once you reassemble the gun, lock the slide back and apply some oil to the exposed portion of the guide rod with a lightly oiled q-tip.

    I use a lightly oiled patch wrapped around an old expired ID card to get between the spring coils. Having oil on the guide rod will of course attract more residue, to clean it I wipe it down alternating between clean and lightly oiled patches.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012

  3. M&P15T

    M&P15T Beard One

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    Why not just put the stock one back in and be done with it?
     
  4. bear_1

    bear_1

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    i was just thinking steel is more lasting than polymer (Plastic)
     
  5. NCWalrus

    NCWalrus

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    Use the stock one until you have problems

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  6. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    Kindly add me to the list of those who think the solution to this one is simply returning to the original recoil spring assembly.
     
  7. barth

    barth six barrels

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    I had an occasional failure to return completely to battery with a tungsten. The spring tension feels lighter on my tungsten and stainless guide rods (they are all captured RSA).

    I'm sure the guide rods are fine.
    But the recoil springs are suspect.

    I bought two OEM RSAs and problem solved.

    I'm just saying
     
  8. SCmasterblaster

    SCmasterblaster G17 carrier since 1989 Millennium Member

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    You'll find a lubricant solution. If not, merely return to the stock RSA.
     
  9. Simplejack

    Simplejack

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    Why do these not work well?
    So many reviews on these parts always have mostly negative reviews. So why are they still selling them? if it's the springs then why don't they sell them with different springs?
    I wanted to get a stainless steel guide rod, but now I don't after reading the reviews..
     
  10. JonInWA

    JonInWA

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    Simply switch back to the stock RSA. If longevity is your concern, some time ago Glock changed the polymer recoil asssembly rod to Zytel, reportedly at the behest of some SE LEO who required that their Glocks be capable of firing 1K rounds of sustained fire without degradation (apparently either zombies are a credible threat down there, or they lacked the ability/assets to call for air/artillery support for whatever the heck they envision doing...). The new ones (they've been standard literally for years now; I think since around 2007 or 2008) are denoted with a "1" seen on the back of the flange of the RSA; they're stronger and less flexible than their predecessors.

    I can see a point in aftermarket RSAs, but primarily for skilled users/reloaders who have the knowledge and wherewithal to tune their recoil springs to a specific load(s) in seeking ultimate performance and recoil management. Needless to say, the vast majority of us are quite well served with the OEM unit-especially if you value uninterrupted operational performance (and spending your savings on something a bit more worthwhile, like practice, training, and competition).

    Best, Jon
     
  11. proguide

    proguide

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    If its your primary carry that you depend on...keep it in stock format.
     
  12. Jim S.

    Jim S.

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    It seems to me that this forum has plenty of people who call a product bad because someone has a problem with it.
    It happens sometimes.
    I have Wolff stainless rods and springs in both of my Glocks and have many thousands of rounds through them without a problem.
    Did you change the spring weight?
    Did you assemble the gun properly?
    There are many more people who have no problems with stainless rods then there are those who don't.
    What brand did you go with?
     
  13. Hugo R

    Hugo R Gaff G26 User!

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    I've never changed stock parts in any of my Glocks. I don't understand why so many people buy a perferctly good product and start messing around with it and then wonder why it doesn't work anymore.

    I've never had any issues with the RSA on any G1, G2 or G3 Glocks that I've dealt with. The issues with the G4's are well documented.

    Therefore, I leave the stock RSA in until they fail which is very rare. I've had one fail (G26) in 19 years of constant use of Glocks.

    JM2C, HR:cool:
     
  14. M&P15T

    M&P15T Beard One

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    LOOL!!

    Noobs.
     
  15. TSAX

    TSAX USAF Vet

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    Not all the aftermarket stuff is bad but Id stick to the original, my G26 still has its same stock rod since 03.

    The aftermarket stuff works for some and not for all. Some people who have these rods change the springs and tune it to the ammo they shoot either lighter loads or hotter loads and these rods can help some. Some people will do it because it looks cool with of chrome, silver parts. There are people who will swear by them but also those who have tested and wasted money. Stock seems to be the most functionally reliable. To each his own.




    :50cal:
     
  16. TSAX

    TSAX USAF Vet

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    If you really want to get the aftermarket running right maybe you need to change the spring to function with the ammo your using or change the ammo. There is a member on this site, I forgot his exact user name but is Jager something, check out his site and you can try calling/emailing him and maybe he can help you find the right spring weight for your ammo to get your gun running right, if you dont want to give up but again stock seems to be the better option. Good luck

    www.jagerproducts.com






    :50cal:
     
  17. sciolist

    sciolist

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    The reasons to change from OE RSA to aftermarket are to alter spring rate, to add mass near the muzzle and to change to an un-captured spring. There is no durability problem with the factory RSA's.

    All else equal, ejection should improve with less spring, and there should be a little less flip with a heavier rod. You should be able to tune the spring rate to match the load. Not sure specifically which factory ammo O/P is using, but it's probably below Glock's design power level, so a little less spring would probably help balance slide function. As suggested above, your spring may be dragging. Some of the aftermarket rods are a little more difficult to install than the OE RSA.

    All of that said, I've never had any problems with any ammo in my 26, and its internals are completely stock.

    The effects of an aftermarket rod and recoil spring are more noticable on a full-size Glock than on a sub-compact.