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Recipe: Inner Beauty-style hot sauce

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by The Pontificator, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    "Inner Beauty" was a very popular hot sauce that first appeared in the Crate & Barrel catalogs back in the 80's.

    Almost as famous as the sauce was the distinctive warning label on the back of the bottle:

    "WARNING: Hottest sauce in North America. Use this to enhance dull and boring food. Keep away from pets, open flames, unsupervised children, and bad advice. This is not a toy. This is serious. Stand up straight, sit right, and stop mumbling."

    Sadly, the Cambridge, MA company that manufactures Inner Beauty appears to have gone out of business. However, the recipe....or at least a very satisfactory copy...lives on:

    Recipe Adapted From : Big Flavors Of The Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger

    15 Scotch Bonnet or Habanero chiles -- finely chopped* (the red ones are great because the flecks can be seen floating in the yellow sauce)
    1 ripe mango peeled, pittted, and mashed.
    1 cup cheap yellow prepared mustard
    1/4 cup packed brown sugar
    1/4 cup white vinegar
    1 tablespoon curry powder
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    1 tablespoon chili powder
    salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

    Mix all ingredients together and funnel into a bottle or jar. Keeps indefinitely under refrigeration. Oh, and yes....it's hot. REAL HOT.

    *I pull the stems off and chop them in a food chopper. I don't mess with chopping up Habanero or Scotch Bonnet chiles by hand. No way!
     
  2. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    1) Mangos are a real PITA to manage. Any tricks, techniques?

    2) Curry powder is subjective. Any particular "brands" that duplicate the original hot sauce? McCormick?
     

  3. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    The curry powder I used was Sand's Brand Hot West Indian Curry powder. (available in West Indian grocery stores) I'm sure any curry powder is fine.

    Mangoes-the ones I bought were SUPER ripe. I simply sliced down each side of the pit then used a spoon to scrape the flesh out of each half and off the pit. I understand that mango flesh is available in the frozen foods section of many grocery stores.

    The chiles I used were marble-sized red scotch bonnet peppers found in the "reduced for quick sale" section of some local supermarket. They'd been in my freezer for probably 2 years and although somewhat freezer burnt were still more than useable. Since they were half the size of similar chiles I used the entire bag...about 30-35 chiles.

    It was fairly hot last night. I took a 1/2 teaspoonful this morning to see how the flavors had melded and...

    ...MOTHER OF ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL!!!

    :shocked: :crying: :burn: :wow: :bowdown: :rock: :faint: :notworthy:
     
  4. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    A Mexican told me a trick to peeling a mango.

    Slice it in half legnthwise, around the "seed" thing. (I don't know who steals them, but I always lay this out on our deck for the critters and they get gone so somebody loves them!)

    Cut just to the skin in the flesh, first legnthwise then side to side. You are making cubes.

    Push the skin and flesh inside out. It will cup outward, sorta like a crude porcupine.

    Slice the cubes free.
     
  5. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    Yep. Answers.com has pictures of that. In this case the flesh was so ripe it just melted away from the skin when scraped with a spoon.

    An acceptable substitute for this recipe would be two peaches.
     
  6. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Peaches will be coming in here in a little bit!
     
  7. Neal

    Neal Millennium Member

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    If one wanted to try this sauce without so much heat, what would you use in place of the habaneros or scotch bonnets?
     
  8. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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    No substitute.

    Habaneros and Scotch Bonnet chiles have a very disctinctive aroma which has been described as "citrus-like" or "apricot-like".

    Simply reduce the amount of chiles and don't use the inner ribs and seeds.

    For a milder sauce I'd say add maybe 2-3 chiles without ribs/seeds.
     
  9. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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  10. The Pontificator

    The Pontificator Angry Samoan

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  11. Neal

    Neal Millennium Member

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    Thank you. :)