Re: what was Frying Pan Finish?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Mr Meeseeks, Aug 21, 2019.

  1. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I believe Frying Pan Finish was created as a final part of the Tennifer process, possibly what is described in the screenshot above.

    The beloved texture is simply the texture of the metal underneath, likely sandblasted. Two reasons for believing this. I once polished the FPF off of a police trade in G32. The texture underneath was exactly the same as the FPF I started with. The other evidence that the texture is metal texture is right there on your FPF slide. Pop it off and look at the underside, near the Firing Pin. Smooth as could be, right?

    So why was Glock adding texture to slides by sandblasting them? I suspect because the QPQ process described above resulted in a very slick finish. It added a little bit of grippiness, though apparently not enough for some.

    If this theory is correct, it somewhat vindicates all the noobs who accidentally make the unholy mistake of calling Tennifer a ‘finish’.

    If anybody has a better theory I’m all ears.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
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  2. Chaos Cosmonaut

    Chaos Cosmonaut

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    Sounds good to me. Thanks for sharing.
     

  3. Glock 17L

    Glock 17L Glock 24 & 26

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    I'm glad you put that up..
    In the other thread that's still at the top there was no one who actually gave a recipe of what they thought the frying pan finish actually was..
     
  4. Valmet

    Valmet M62/76 Silver Member

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    This is very insightful info, thanks
     
  5. Mike-M

    Mike-M

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    Glock did NOT abandon the ferritc nitrocarburizing metal surface treatment when it transferred to a gaseous process rather than Durferrit's proprietary TENIFER salt-bath process. There is no visible, mechanical, or chemical difference in the results. It is not a "finish" unless the real but purely cosmetic finish is not applied afterwards.

    Many seem to worry and fret and care more about the superficial make-up than what's underneath. One is unrelated to the other.
     
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  6. Rocky7

    Rocky7 Proud NRA Life Patron Member, Life GSSF member

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    Very Good, appreciate the shared info. Myself I have only (2) 26’s left that have this sweat protection.

    Im not going to attempt to look nor pursue an outside source, but if common sense at Glock returned and 30s’s were available, I would procure (2) more.

    Thanks again.
     
  7. glocker199

    glocker199

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    That doesn't really explain why the FPF appeared a couple decades into Glock's existence when they'd been using Tenifer since the beginning.
     
  8. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    Never claimed otherwise.
     
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  9. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    I thought it was made from melted-down frying pans.
     
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  10. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    upload_2019-8-22_14-49-55.png

    It's clear that Tenifer alone is not the black top coat, it's a result of the additional oxidation treatment (AB1, whatever that is).
     
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  11. WayneJessie

    WayneJessie

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    Whatever it is/was, I certainly appreciate its toughness on my 19. Of the Glocks that I have that finish/treatment is far more wear resistant than the others.
     
  12. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    There’s a fellow with reading comprehension. This is exactly the premise of the thread. It’s a theory, but IMO the best working theory behind the elusive FPF secret sauce.
     
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  13. Jbritt

    Jbritt

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    My question is why did they go away from this finish to the caulky grey finish? The FPF while I don’t like it for its shiny look and slick feel, was the most durable finish by far. My 2005 19 looks way better (less wear) than my 2018 19 gen 4. I actually like the gen 4 finish better because I can tell I’ve carried it.
     
  14. BBMW

    BBMW

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    As some point they went from salt bath ferric nitorcarborizing to gaseous nitrocarborizing. That may account for at least some of the difference.
     
  15. WayneJessie

    WayneJessie

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    Glock had several different finishes going on at the same time. Nobody really knows if perhaps Glock had to sublet a certain amount of slides to outside companies or if Glock had more than one process going on in their factory.
     
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  16. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    Glock refinished my G19 a couple of years ago and the black finish on that seems to be more durable than the G4 17 stock finish (the matte gray) purchased around the same time.
     
  17. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    According to GT lore, FPF was the last finish applied to Tennifer treated parts. I’d have to dig for the thread, but the story goes that barrels were the first to be tested with gas nitriding and the new finish that goes along with that. Barrels are easier to replace, when they rust out. Internally, these were known as Zebra guns. Check out the Deep luster on the Tennifered barrel on my G37 compared to the pale gray barrel on my late 2010 G21

    [​IMG]

    Both have FPF slides, which I believe it’s safe to assume are Tennifer....

    Now zoom in on that pretty G21 barrel. That’s pitting, rust. Have personally seen it on 3 guns from this era. The early Tennifer alternative was pretty pitiful.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. GlockFan7

    GlockFan7

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    This just never goes away, does it? This topic has been debated more times than the Kennedy assassination. While the actual metal treatment (what you don't see) application process has changed from bath process to gas process over the years, chemically, it's been essentially the same for decades. The metal finish (what you do see) has changed numerous times over the years. Currently, DLC is in fashion. The beloved frying pan textured finish process ended late 2012. I can't say when it began, but my dad's 90s vintage Glock 27 and my 2013 vintage Glock 27 look essentially the same. My 2012 Glock 23 looks very different from either...on the slide only. While there may be subtle shade difference, the barrels, made 20 years apart are smooth and not textured. Though the 23 and both 27s have been carried for a number of years in different areas of the country, all have been carried in similar high humidity, often salty environments, with zero rust. Barrels and slides are treated with exactly the same process. To do so otherwise, would be inefficient, costing more money in both utilization as well as the processing and disposal of hazardous materials/waste . The two components part ways with the finish texture. Sandblasting was mentioned earlier and while blasting is a potential explanation, steel grit vs. sand might be more likely as the profile created by sand which can only be used once before it turns to powder, resulting increase product usage and disposal cost, where steel can be recycled through the system a number of times as long as it passes a sieve test. Blast media such as sand, steel, glass bead, walnut shells, etc. vary in their aggressive nature and their resulting profile (surface roughness). When you look at house paint as an example, the same paint may be available as flat, satin, semi-gloss or even textured. Each gives a different result, although the surface of the material remains the same. My thought is the final portion of beloved frying pan finish process was intended as nothing more than a grip enhancement, while many claim that it's the exact opposite when wet from sweat, blood, etc.
     
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  19. Toocool45

    Toocool45

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    The tenifer metal treatment ended in early 2009. Ive got 2 later production frying pan finish guns. One a November, 2014 gen 3 22C USA production its near perfect condition. The 2nd very late production frying pan finish gun. A gen 3 21 SF October, 2014. It just has very, very minor finish wear on the leading edges of the front of the slide. You may not even notice it looking at it. They are for sure frying pan finish guns. Im very suprised to have found them. Ive picked them both up in the last month. Both came with boxes.