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get ready
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Discussion Starter #1
I took the opportunity to head on down to my local firing line tonight. I am still a novice as I have only been at this shooting business for a few weeks now, so I am trying to get all the practice I can.

Many of my follow up shots were landing low and just a bit left. I assumed this meant I was anticipating recoil. I tried to focus on recovering my sight picture quickly for the follow ups, and I wasn't firing until I had the target clearly sighted. My trigger finger may have also been a bit too much on the first knuckle, rather than the pad of my finger, but I'm not sure if that would contribute to low shooting. Anyone have tips for shooting low?

I did have one failure to fire, but it I don't think it was the G19's fault. It was the last round in the mag, I pulled the trigger and it only clicked. I ejected the round and saw that the primer had been struck, but no bang. I put that round on the top of the next mag and it went bang the second time. I was using 115gr FMJ PRVI Partizan.

Anyway, I feel I am getting better each time. Oh, and it's a lot of fun too. :supergrin:
 

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Registered
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306 Posts
I am a new shooter as well and I have having the exact same problem! I have a Glock 19 and I consistently shoot low and to the left. Even after I looked at this chart and tried to fix it I couldn't hit dead center. I'm pretty sure I have a trigger control problem and I will just need to do some dry fire practice with some Snap-Caps. Regardless I once I have the money I will taking some classes at my local range so I can have an instructor look at me as I shoot and tell me the flaws that I can't find myself.

 

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get ready
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520 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yea, I am thinking mine may be trigger control too. I picked up some snap caps a couple weeks ago and have been practicing at home. I think repetition is the key. Even still, dry firing and live firing are completely different.
 

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RetiredDinosaur
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Yea, I am thinking mine may be trigger control too. I picked up some snap caps a couple weeks ago and have been practicing at home. I think repetition is the key. Even still, dry firing and live firing are completely different.
That they are.....now, grab your snap caps, and read this:

Click-> http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=159 (that way I don't have to keep re-typing it over and over again) :)

Also, when the gun clicked on the round that didn't fire, what did your sights do? Did they stay well aligned and on target? Or did the front sight move down into the area of the target where your low hits were impacting?
 

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get ready
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520 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Butch, I actually read your article yesterday before I went to the range. I wanted to try mixing in my snap caps b/c I think that's a great idea, but I didn't have anyone to load my mags for me. On the FTF, I can't remember exactly, but I do think I flinched, moving the muzzle down a bit, so that was telling. I feel like I dry fire practice quite a bit, but for some reason I still have a tendency to flinch a bit when shooting live ammo. I guess it will get better with practice. I've only been at this a few weeks so far.
 

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(>'-')>
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the more and more you shoot live ammo the less you should be anticipating the fire as a jerk that needs to be controlled and you will start to just let it happen.

kind of like how golfers hold their follow through for a second or two after the swing so that bringing the club down doesn't become part of the swing mechanics itself.



what im trying to say is go shoot. only way youll get better.
 
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