Range Money Oh No.... Help Opinions

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by GlockoPopPopPop, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. GlockoPopPopPop

    GlockoPopPopPop

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    So day 2 of shooting my new glock23 and I love it.....maybe too much. I didnt realize how expensive this hobby would be!

    I just bought $160 worth of $14/50 ammo at Wallmart, and I already went through a third of it!!! and usually i cant even find it that cheap

    What AM I GONNA DO????

    How often do you guys shoot?

    How much do you shoot when you go?


    I got the lone wolf conversion on its way, but even the 9mm ammo didnt look that cheap!

    Do some of you guys buy 22 revolvers just to shoot off rounds? What do you guys do?

    Also, what about recasing your own?
     
  2. 3rdgen40

    3rdgen40 .45 fanatic

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  3. gordo993

    gordo993

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    advantage arms .22lr conversion kit. you can shoot cheap (relatively) .22lr while still using your G23 frame/trigger.

    I have one for my G27 and love it!!!
     
  4. BadAndy

    BadAndy

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    This.

    I can load 115gr plated rounds for about $7-$8 per 50.
     
  5. TACC GLOCK

    TACC GLOCK SEMPER FIDELIS

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    I agree with reloading, but also only shoot my CC ammo one magazine every time I go to the range. I also agree with using my 22 to practice fundamentals at the range.
    Lastly, the only time I go to a "static" range is to try out new reloads / gun equipment options. The remainder of the "range" time is conducted at pistol competitions where I can practice more realistic shooting scenarios tobecome more proficient with what I am carrying.
     
  6. DustyDawg48

    DustyDawg48

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    This.

    I found that my range time was just spent putting rounds down range without much purpose. After I started shooting IDPA I found skills that I needed to work on and it gave my range time much more purpose. A majority of the skills that usually need work can be done without firing a single round. Working on mag changes, drawing from concealment, practicing the different reloads (tactical, reload with retention, and emergency/slide-lock) can be done at home and when you go the the range you have a plan. It can cut down on the number of rounds you would normally shoot per session.

    Just to give you an idea, I shoot primarily .45 ACP and for $160 I can buy 1,000 Montana Gold Bullet 200 grain FMJ, 1,000 primers and a pound of powder and probably have enough left over for a trip to Burger King. The initial cost of reloading can be easily recouped and it's another skill that is fun to learn.
     
  7. GlockoPopPopPop

    GlockoPopPopPop

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    Thanks Guys, so to me it sounds like reloading is the way to go.... seems probably even a little fun to do, another thing to play with when im not shooting...

    I saw a nice little 22 revolver by smith and wesson that would prob be nice to shoot, and nice to have when i bring first time shooters with me, maybe ill pick one of them up too!
     
  8. picturethis

    picturethis

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    Isn't it true that reloading a .40 is a lot harder than a 9 or .45, especially for a newbie at it?
     
  9. fuzzy03cls

    fuzzy03cls

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    That's how I was. I only picked up a gun last December. Blasted through $2K worth of ammo in 3 months.
    When your 1st shooting, it takes $ to learn. No way around it. At least once you get decent the costs go down because you shoot less. Now I only shoot 2 times a month & only 100-200 rounds.
     
  10. Matt Berry

    Matt Berry

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    You won't really save any money by reloading, you'll just shoot more for the same money. Actually you'll probably even shoot more, just so you have more brass to reload.

    Bottom line is get into reloading, and save yourself about 40-50% off from retail ammo prices, especially if you buy in bulk. Be warned though reloading is addictive and components are a little hard to find right now, even some of the powders are running a little tight.
     
  11. Matt Berry

    Matt Berry

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    Reloading for any caliber is about the same, it's only when you get into rifle or necked down cartridges that things get "more" difficult, and even then it's not that big of a deal. People just hear about kabooms and case separations and instantly think the 40 is harder to reload, it really isn't
     
  12. Eagle22

    Eagle22

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    I have been shooting ( again ) after a 12 year break. I shoot about once a month and find my first 5 rounds are always my best shots.

    after that they are OK. so only shoot 100 or so rounds. Need to get into some intro to IDPA and learn what skills I need to work on.
     
  13. DustyDawg48

    DustyDawg48

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    I don't think it's harder as much as you just have to exercise caution at every step with any reloading. The 9mm and .40 cal rounds are much higher pressure than the .45 ACP and therefore have a much smaller margin of error. Read the manual, measure the case length and inspect each one for any splits or excessive bulging. The biggest thing is making sure your powder hopper drops what it's supposed to and you constantly measure your drops and double-check for any double-charges.

    Reloading is fun and it's another way to enjoy your hobby when time or weather keeps you from hitting the range.
     
  14. DB9

    DB9

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    I feel ya OP. I've only had my 23 for 3 months now, and I've gone thru almost $300 of ammo. I suppose that's not that much, about 150 rds every Sat.
    I recently got a 40-9, but I can't find 9mm locally for under $12, and that's by the case.
    Seriously thinking about getting into reloading as well.
     
  15. FlyfishermanMike

    FlyfishermanMike

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    In the same boat too. I don't have the time or money to get into reloading. I picked up an Advantage Arms .22 kit, shoot around 500 rounds each time out and it only costs me $20. ^^ike
     
  16. ronin.45

    ronin.45

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    Every shooter should have a .22 to practice with. Reloading is a great way to save money on your primary ammo. I don't have any room to reload so I stock up on ammo when I find it cheap. I don't normally shoot at paper unless I'm plinking with a rimfire. Mostly I shoot IDPA and steel plates. Competitions usually stay under 100rds.
     
  17. ChristopherBurg

    ChristopherBurg

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    As stated by others learn to reload. This is the only reason I'm able to afford practicing with my .45 auto guns.
    I try to get to the range every weekend if I can.
    I'll usually go through 50 to 100 rounds of full sized caliber ammunition then move over to .22 for however long I feel like shooting. The Advantage Arms .22 conversion kit is a godsend for me.
     
  18. BadAndy

    BadAndy

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    The only difference between loading 9mm, .40 and .45 is the dies, primers (9 and .40 share them though), powder and bullets.

    None are harder than the other. Any time you load your own ammo you should exercise extreme caution because you can cause yourself harm or unnecessary headaches if you don't stay focused and following the reloading manuals.

    I've loaded for .45, .40 and now 9 mm and enjoy it a lot. I'm not a competition shooter and I probably shoot no more than a few hundred rounds a month so the cost savings have been pretty once I recovered the cost of the equipment which didn't take too long since I shot A TON when I first started reloading.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2010
  19. forsythglock

    forsythglock

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    I have the same problem, but I only shoot about 200 rounds/week. For those in the know, what kind of investment would it take to get into reloading, assuming that I would just be reloading 9mm? How much more if I want to also get equipment to reload 45ACP? Thanks!
     
  20. DEADLYACCURATE

    DEADLYACCURATE Senior Member

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    read this https://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1027887