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Quick Question on a 1999 Ducati 750 SS

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by Delon, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. Delon

    Delon

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    I have a friend who is selling one, and he is willing to give me a good deal.

    This bike has about 9k miles on, brand new paint and "full" fairing.
    It just got a complete check out from the Ducati dealer and was A OK.

    Anything I should been on the lookout for ? I have never owned a Ducati. Also, what would you guys think the resale value of this bike to be ?

    Thanks
     
  2. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Those 2-valves aircooled V-twins are pretty much bulletproof and maintenance isn't too bad although still more intensive than a comparable bike. Back then electronic gremlins were still prevalent and the fuel injection wasn't too hot either. However, the fuel injection issue could be dealt with by an aftermarket exhaust system and either a Power Commander or a new chip.

    It's a super sport so it won't be as sporty as a Ducati superbike but it's still quite a little thriller. A couple of the older gents that I ride with sport the 900SS of this generation and they'll get up and go pretty good to around 120 or so. This bike, with less oomph, is probably spirited enough to accelerate hard into 110. Figure it makes around 60-HP and 46-lbft of torque for a low 400-lbs bike.

    If you could, learn how to wrench on it yourself or you will find visits to the dealerships to be rather costly.

    Oh, and unless you're in superb physical condition, plan on visiting the chiropractor if you decide to ride this gem for more than an hour or so at a time.

    Italian sport bikes (Ducati, Aprilia, MV Agusta, et al) have two types of ergonomics: really bad and bad. When you are in the position, it's easy to throw the bike into a corners because the extreme seating arrangement allows you to body steer the bike very easily. The price you pay is the torture rack that is the seating position.
     

  3. norton

    norton

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    My brother in law had a 99 900 supersport, just like the one pictured.
    He has owned several ducati's.
    Fnfalman is right, those bikes are torture racks-
    But IMO nothing sounds as good as a ducati with pipes. The engines are very responsive. Plan on high maintenance costs. Like valve adjustments. And don't these bikes have dry clutches? Dry clutches are an answer to a question no longer asked. They get grabby in stop and go traffic.
    Ducs seem to keep their resale value pretty well. I don't think you will get hurt on it if you decide to re sell it.
     
  4. norton

    norton

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    I just noticed the one in the photo is a 750.
    His looked just like this one though it was a 900.
     
  5. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    There were two SS variations: half-fairing and full-fairing. I don't see too many half-fairing models running around SoCal. The dry clutch isn't good for traffic and for slipping but they are great when you get into the spirited driving mode (it's either engaged or it's not although lots of people prefer to feather the clutch in the corner and a wet clutch works great for this) and of course Ducati makes no bones about making a sport bike that is too amenable for street riding. I do believe their sport tourer ST-series have wet clutches.

    Hell, BMW still has dry clutches on a lot of their bikes and they are made for the streets.

    I have but two reasons for not owning a Ducati:

    1. Everybody and their brothers have one. It's like the European's Harley-Davidson of sport bike.

    2. More maintaince than my high-mileage self prefer.

    Otherwise they're great rider's bikes. Not necessarily great bikes; heaven knows that the Eye-ties have a serious problem with quality and electrical and electronics, but great rider's bikes. Everything is purposeful and compromise isn't in their names. And that's why they are prized even though a Japanese equivalent cost about 1/3 less and go about 1/3 faster.
     
  6. Delon

    Delon

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    Thanks for the input
    I talked to him yesterday and have him talked down to $2850 in cash for it. The kelly blue book on it says its worth about $4900 in like new condition, so I don't think I can get hurt to bad on it.

    I am not a BIG speed fan, just want something that is fun to ride.
    This will be the 1st bike I have been on in like 10 years.

    He has put the after martket pipes on it, but not the power commander.

    I am not sold on a ducati, but don't think I can find the same amount of "bike" for that amount of cash.

    I do have a friend who does all the wrenching on his 750 monster and is willing to show me how.

    Thanks,
     
  7. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    If your bike runs like crap then go with a Power Commander. If not then don't worry about it.

    The 750SS should be a good bike for you to reintroduce yourself to. It's not going to be blazing fast but fast enough to get the juices flowing and the handling & braking are pretty damn nice.

    The valve adjustment on these old 2-valvers are fairly easy unlike the Testastretta engines. But you do need to be spot on with the valve adjustment intervals though (should be around every 6000-miles for that engine).

    If you like sport riding, you'll like the bike. If you just want to putt around then you'll hate it in a hurry.

    Try not to get too deep into the "Ducati Lifestyle" and start wearing Ducati emblazoned everything. To tell you the truth, I've always thought that it's kind of gay to go around dressing like a factory billboard, but the Duck boys love their Ducati leathers like the Harley boys love their HD vests and the BMW boys love their Roundel suits.
     
  8. ndbullet500

    ndbullet500 Unmutual

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    I agree 100%, the sound of a Ducati is THE BEST. It makes the chest rumble when one goes by at speed, but doesn't have that popping sound of a Harley.

    BTW, Norton are you going to Vintage Motorcycle Days at Mid-Ohio next week. Lots of Norton parts (and lots of Nortons racing).
     
  9. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Let's not get carried away now.:)

    I'll take my Aprilia's mad dog growl over any chest thumping or potato-potato lumping any day.:supergrin:
     
  10. norton

    norton

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    No I won't be able to make it, although I often attend the AMA superbike races at Mid Ohio. Its a great track, the superbikers always put on a good show.