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Quick question for you folks that do wood working.

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by M2 Carbine, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    I'm working on a Ruger 10/22 stock. I have to remove the original finish down to the bare wood. Short of sanding the old finish off is there a paint remover available that will remove the finish but won't mess up the wood in any way?
     
  2. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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    It depends on what finish it is. If it's polyurethane I don't know of any. If it's shellac denatured alcohol should work. If it's varnish paint stripper should work.
     

  3. GlockPride

    GlockPride Glock 23

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    I just started with 150 grit and moved up until I got to 400 before refinishing mine.
     
  4. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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    I must correct myself, there are some strippers that work on polyurethane on the market. I can't say anything about them since I've never used them. Good luck with the project M2.
     
  5. harlenm

    harlenm Millennium Member

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  6. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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  7. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Knowing nothing about wood finishes I don't know what Ruger uses on their stocks. It is a right tough finish though.

    Being somewhat lazy, I'm trying to avoid that if there's a quicker easier way to remove the finish.:supergrin:

    But I don't want to damage the wood either.

    I don't have a dishwasher. I doubt that would work on this kind of finish.
     
  8. Historian

    Historian NRA Benefactor Lifetime Member

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    Wow. It kinda...well it should work! I didn't' see if he used any chemicals to remote the finish. Did I miss something?

    The last rife I refinished I used a curled box cutter on and very gently scarped the old finish off and then ued various grades of sand paper to finish it...then finally using hot water to raise any curled wood and then the finest sand paper to finish with.

    This advice came from an old gunsmith...it came out pretty good.
     
  9. Laramie In MT

    Laramie In MT

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    I stripped my 10/22. I just used an orbital sander to get a majority of the finish, then finished up with 400-600 grit. I have used the citrus based removers before, but they require gloves, a well ventilated area and will burn your skin. I don't care for them much.

    Here's my 10/22. I cut off the barrel band and refinished the end.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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    You missed the fact that the finish on an M1 and most surplus rifles(except the Russians, who liked shellac) use a form of oil and cosmoline as a protective. Both are removed via the heat and the detergent, but varnish or shellac are dissolved finishes which typically only come off using mechanical action or a stripper.
     
  11. tous

    tous GET A ROPE!

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    The problem isn't so much removing the old finish, it's what removing the old finsih does to the wood.

    Ruger probably uses polyurethane. It's tough, cheap and shines up well. Depending on the wood, when you use a chemical stripper you risk raising the grain and thew wood will look liek it's growing whiskers. Laminated stocks are worse. The various plies tend to do different things. Also keep in mind that once stripped, your stock will absorb moisture.

    As Historian noted, it's often best to remove the old finish by abrasion. Find a woodworker's store and buy some scrapers. They're just hard steel with a slight hook machined onto one side. You can get them in a variety of shapes for getting into most nooks and crannies.

    Oiled finishes tend to saturate the wood and make using another product such as lacquer, varnish or poly difficult. I have had success lacquering over oiled finsihes. Start really thin, apply lightly, build up layer upon layer until the oil is sealed off, then go for the gold.
     
  12. Laramie In MT

    Laramie In MT

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    ETA: I used this. But I didn't use their stain, just the oil and finisher, I used another stain I had.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. failsafe

    failsafe

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    Last rifle I refinished was a Marlin model 60..I took the old finsh off with a product called Zip Strip...Brush it on, it bubbles, use a putty knife on the first coat..repeat, and add steel wool to assist....Might want to get a pair of rubber gloves and be careful, they will melt from the Zip Strip..
    I used multiple applications of tung oil for the new finish...
    I don't have a better pic handy..But it is the 3rd up from the bottom..
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Hef

    Hef Stop Obammunism

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    Gel stripper. I've used it to chemically strip old stained door slabs prior to mechanical stripping. Works great. Use a putty knife to gently scrape the wood after the gel has done it's thing, followed by light rinsing/wiping, and sanding up to 320 or 400 grit.
     
  15. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Thanks all for the advice.

    Next trip to town I'll look for Zip Strip and Gel stripper.

    I've used True Oil to finish several military stocks and this TC Hawken kit I built. I like it and will probably use it again on the Ruger stock.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. failsafe

    failsafe

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    The Zip Strip is a gel..Just to add, grab some old crew socks or such, put on your hands like a sock puppet...Helps in the final Zip strip application...
    Rinse the stripper off ..That will raise the grain of the wood and you will need to sand or in my case steel wool the surface...
    I applied the tung oil with my finger's..but since you are familiar with that product....Good Luck...Waiting for pic's..
     
  17. harleyfx69

    harleyfx69

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    its not very difficult to just use a random orbital sander over the stock, dont even need much pressure to take off the coating,

    then just restain it with your choice of stain, or oil or whatever you want to do,

    chemicals arent the best way to do it
     
  18. Historian

    Historian NRA Benefactor Lifetime Member

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    Ahh gotcha. Innovative method for dealing with it. :cool: Figures you would know based on our many conversations.

    You guys do some nice work.