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Questions about GSD

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by boby, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. boby

    boby

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    Hello all I have read some of the other threads but I have some additional questions.

    How much does a full blooded, matured GSD weigh? I live in an apartment and have a pet weight limit of 120 LB. Is that pushing it?

    Is kraftwerk.com a reputable dealer? They are main links on Google so I assume so but you never know. The puppies are $2500 with no training and $3500 with some basic training. Is that considered a good price? I spoke with a girl at the pet store because I just happened to stop in and look at some fish. She told me that she paid $2300 for her full blooded GSD. So I assume $2000 is a realistic starting price. She said that it was the best dog she has ever owned and he was very easy to train. Does this sound about right? I just want to be sure im not wasting my money. $2500-3500 is alot of money to spend.

    When people say "crate" they just mean cage right?

    Kraftwerks "older puppies" have "basic training". This is defined as "The puppies offered on this page are bred, raised and trained here by our expert staff. Beginning at eight weeks old they are separated from their litter mates and start learning basic living skills. Accustomed to the crate, kennel and traveling by vehicle. Housebroken and taught to follow basic obedience commands with positive reinforcement techniques. Will follow the handler on lead, sit and down with command/hand signal. Come when called and started in the stay position.". Is this worth the extra $1000?


    I have read that GSD's need to be "given a task" or they will find one that you don't like. Now I live in an apartment so I cant go out and play fetch or anything everyday. But long walks are perfectly fine. I can go play catch and such once or twice a week at my uncles (He has a huge yard.) Is this sufficient or is not the right dog for me?

    I apologize as my post is kind of out of order! Thanks for any help guys :)
     
  2. naymless

    naymless

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    Kraftwerk is a VERY good reputible kennel and training facility. I have done some reading up on them and they are for sure worth the money if you can afford them. I breed and raise GSD's and have looked into using them for training. But its too far for me to ship my dogs. The shipping would be outragous.
     

  3. Walter45Auto

    Walter45Auto

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    German shepherds that are 120 pounds aren't the norm. The average is about 77-85 pounds. Mine's on the smaller side between 70 to 75 pounds. 90 is more common than 120.


    :freak:






    :reindeer: :50cal:
     
  4. naymless

    naymless

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    My male is about 100lbs and my female is about 85lbs.
     
  5. TenMillimeter

    TenMillimeter

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    My male is a very long, tall and skinny 90 lb., while my female is a very short, wide 85 lb.

    I agree - 120 is a very big Shepherd, though it's not unheard of.
     
  6. GSD/G23

    GSD/G23

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    The typical GSD is like any herding dog, his drive to work is there. Some dogs have higher drives than others but they need somekind of work to keep them happy.

    Daily, long walks are great,he will love it. After a couple of weeks he will make sure you don't forget to walk! My girl knows what is going on when she see's me get the leash after coming home from work. She gets excited and runs and sits by the door. I like several breeds but a quailty GSD is my favorite. After doing your homework on breeders I say, pay a little more, get a little more!
     
  7. bigGUNS04

    bigGUNS04

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    I got the runt (male) and he is 80.... His dad was almost 120. The breeder where I bought mine the males average around 110
     
  8. itisbruno

    itisbruno Devious Member CLM

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    Based on my experience, I would disagree.
     
  9. dkbrucedvm

    dkbrucedvm

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    That sounds big to me. I'm no expert, but 80 pounds looked good on the GSD's I can recall offhand. AKC does not list a desired weight for GSD's but rather lists height and length. Keep in mind, the larger the dog, the more likely you are to have orthopedic problems (hips and knees). Size is also the easiest thing to breed into or out of a dog, so it is the weakest selling point for breeding quality.

    Buy fish, not dogs, from the pet store. I've known some pet store people who knew dogs, but they're the exception and they didn't stay at the pet store long.

    Yep.

    I don't think so, but YMMV. I think buying a trained dog is paying someone else to have your fun for you.

    GSD's are not the first dog I'd think of to recommend for an apartment. It's not the size as much as the energy level. Again, YMMV, but it's the exceptional owner who can keep a GSD in an apartment happy.

    We all hope this helps. Free advice is always worth what you paid for it. Twice that in my case. :rofl:
     
  10. Slobberchops

    Slobberchops WTF?!?!?

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    Nice looking pup in your avatar! :thumbsup:
     
  11. obxemt

    obxemt Chaplain of CT

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    You'd be hard pressed to find a 120-pound GSD that wasn't either an anomaly or morbidly obese.

    I personally could not justify that kind of money for a dog. I'd spend less than half of that for a finely bred dog and save the rest for equipment and all the training I could muster.

    Large, high-drive working breeds won't be satisfied with just daily "long walks." Not being properly exercised off-lead could lead to destructive behavior. The alternative would be keeping the dog crated all the time, which is a very bad alternative.

    Make sure you do lots of research and be honest with yourself before committing to bringing a working breed into your home, especially an apartment.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  12. Platz

    Platz

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    I know this is a very old thread, but since it's been brought up from the dead-thread grave...

    120 lbs is insane on a well bred GSD. My male that I adopted several months ago is oversized by GSD standards and weighs in right now at 95 lbs. He could use another 5 lbs right now. This is not what you want to shoot for. He's gorgeous, and I love his size, but I hate to think of what the future will hold for hip and elbow health. He was adopted, so I have no idea of his breeding and therefor it's a gamble at best.

    A GSD can be perfectly happy in an apartment IF they are well exercised. IMHO many shepherds would do better in apt's than many of the normal "apt sized dogs" that people get. Just because a dog is small doesn't make it a good apartment dog, and vice versa. Walks, no matter the length, will not be enough. The dog needs to RUN each and every day, unless it's a very lazy GSD (and there are some out there). Find a big safe field, go to public schools after hours, socialize the snot out of your dog and take him to a nice dog park, etc. There are ways, just have to be somewhat more creative to exercise properly.

    And to answer the question - no, I absolutely don't think the price they are requiring is worth it for what they state the dog will be trained in. He'd better do laundry and dishes for that price, as well as mow the lawn and pick up his own poop! JMHO

    I have seen fantastically trained dogs go to crap when they get to a new home. Training a dog is 10% training the dog, and 90% training the handler. Get a pup 8 - 10 weeks old, and find a quality trainer in your area. Then invest that money you would have spent on a "trained" (not trained, not even green by my standards) puppy and use it to pay a trainer to train you to train your dog. Training builds a relationship, respect, and trust. It's not just about the dog obeying you.
     
  13. M1A Shooter

    M1A Shooter

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    i have 3 GSDs currently, just got one to foster today. they are all 2-3 years old and are all males. i have one that is tall and long and super skinny from being very active with a high drive and hes 90lbs. the other is a couple inches shorter and is fat at 95lbs. the one we just got today i would say is mostly "average sized and weighs in at 75lbs.

    i think they are the most well rounded dog ive ever worked with. you can train them to do most anything. one of mine has an insanely high energy level so i play alot of fetch with him, he runs with me and does some agility and loves to swim in the lake.
    my other one is quite a bit more lazy but he is in training to be a therapy animal like our 4th dog, which is a pomeranian.

    i agree with the above that most of the training is the handler and not so much the dog. the dog can do anything but the trainer has to get it out of them consistantly.