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Discussion in 'GSSF' started by lewprinting, Jul 27, 2006.

  1. lewprinting

    lewprinting

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    I'm getting ready for the match in topton pa next month. So I've been working on my dry firing drills with a new G17 I just got about 3 months ago.

    I had a G33 which I traded in for the G17. (Cheaper ammo = more practice). One of the things I noticed in getting my 17 was that I have a much more difficult time keeping the front site steady in dryfire practice than I did with the 33. The shot break on the 33 was really smooth. It was like BUTTA.

    As a side note, I bought the 33 about a 1.5 years ago and it was used when I bought it.

    Is it possible that the 17 just needs a break in period to smooth out the trigger pull so I can keep that front site steady? (I did polish the trigger parts when I first got it).


    What are some of your experiences with older used glocks vs. brand new ones?
     
  2. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    Your new Glock should smooth out with time. It is legal to lightly polish the internals and to use a factory 3.5# connector. I personally prefer used Glocks because of their lower price.
     

  3. lewprinting

    lewprinting

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    Thanks for the info. I'm also leaving the pistol cocked even when storing. My theory is that over time, that may take a little bit of strength out of the firing pin spring, resulting in a smoother trigger pull and shot break.

    You're welcome to tell me if you think thats bannanas!:)
     
  4. Joe Mc

    Joe Mc

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    Make sure the internals are nice and smooth should help and maybe use more of your left hand preasure ( if your right handed ) to relieve some preasure off of your trigger finger. 80 % left hand and 20 % right hand. Try it , it might work. See you at Topton
    Joe
     
  5. lewprinting

    lewprinting

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    Yeah, I did polish the parts and I've been trying a little more grip with my support hand. One big thing I did figure out is that I had my firing hand a bit too far forward on the grip. I now have my firing hand more toward the rear which makes the pistol line up straight with my wrist so that my forearm and the pistol are basically in a straight line. I actually picked that up by watching Todd Jarrett on a show called Shooting Gallery on the outdoor channel. (fantastic show BTW). That has really improved my ability to keep the front sight steady when dry firing. It seems that you can have a smooth trigger pull untill the cows come home but if your grip stinks, you'll still have a hard time keeping the front site straight.

    It has also really helped at the range. I practice by shooting at 9 inch paper plates at about 12 yards and I've been hitting dead center for the most part. Now all I have to do is increase my speed.

    See you at Topton