question regarding entering the army

Discussion in 'US Army Forum' started by powercore01, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. Victor Dubya

    Victor Dubya The Kindly Curmudgeon

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    My troll flag went off too. LOL!
     
  2. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Looking at your grammar, I'm thinking you might try the Marines.:rofl:

    But on a serious note, you probably want to aim some direction other than the military. Unless WW III starts tomorrow, they won't take you due to your drug and mental health history.

    That's assuming this was a serious post and not trolling.

    If you are being serious, then don't do it even if they give you every conceivable waiver and let you in. The purpose of basic training is to take perfectly normal people, like the high school football star, and put them under as much stress as they can stand. It's no place for people who already have anxiety issues. After basic training, it can get even worse.
     

  3. Mugsie1

    Mugsie1

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    I thought it was a BS post too, but decided to give him the benefit of the doubt. If it's a troll, then I was had. If it's not, then maybe I helped in some small way. Either way, I'm OK with it.
     
  4. Jade Falcon

    Jade Falcon Rational

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    Firstly, let me commend you for being brave enough to discuss this problem here.

    I also want to make it clear that I've never served in the military, but I have dealt with far more than my fair share of mental issues in life, and mental health issues have encompassed my entire family....mother, father, sister, and I. On occasions such as these, I don't mind sharing them in the hope that it will help.

    My mother had a violent temper when I was growing up which she took out on me, stemming back to her own childhood trauma of sexual abuse by a next-door neighbor that also led to a drinking problem that started when she was just 10 years old. My father lost his first wife in a drowning accident, and still deals with the grief today, as well as being very Bipolar. My sister has many health issues, some of it stemming from a food poisoning incident as a child which almost killed her, but she lost everything she had (job, house, custody of her son and cars) to a heroine addiction as an adult, and now lives with a drug addict she met in rehab who may or may not be clean (nobody knows). All three of them have been drug addicts and alcoholics....my parents have been clean and sober about 30 years, and I am currently estranged from my sister.

    I was also born premature at 3 lbs 2 oz, and have suffered life-long hearing deficits and inner-ear disorders related to it; all of which have hindered me in various aspects of my life at some point or another. And combined with my mother's verbal and physical abuse that I suffered as a child, and my father's Bipolar disorder, I can tell you that I've got more than my own share of anger problems, trust me.

    Find the root cause of your anger issues. For me, my anger issues can be traced currently to a very personal matter that I only discuss with my counselor; something which has plagued me since I was about 10 years old, and not related to my mother's abuse. I'm angry at myself for this problem, deeply ashamed, angry at my parents for not being able to see my perspective on what I suffer through on an almost daily basis, and bitter about how my life overall has turned out, among many other things.

    But when I sought help for this very personal problem around 2007, I had to address it and face it head-on. It was the single hardest thing I've ever had to do, but it was worth it, and addressing it helped. And I went from a suicide attempt in 2007 to being in a better place now, with a far better structure around me, happier overall, and living in a better place. And now, in counseling, I'm taking the next step of addressing my anger and my own addictive personality, as well as my problem, which is an entirely different topic for another time, and not one I'll probably ever discuss here.

    As others here have said, running from your problems is NOT the answer, and the military isn't going to help. That being said, if what you need to rise up out of your anger is a new change in your life, then it might be worth it to seek a new course. Is the military the right course for you? I don't know....that would be between your counselor, recruiter, and you. Keep in mind, however, that recruiters are NOT counselors or psychiatrists. Their job is to get you to sign on the dotted line....nothing more, nothing less. So keep that in mind if you choose to discuss any of your personal issues with them.

    It may also be something as simple as changing medication, or even changing counselors. When I sought help in 2007, it was with a doctor who had a very "professional/distant" relationship, and I always got the feeling that she spoke to me as a patient or object instead of a person. Eventually after 7 years, I stopped seeing her. Now the counselor I see, whom I met in late-2018, is far more down-to-earth, and has struggled with similar issues as me. And I really like the guy, and he's recently encouraged me into group therapy, which I enjoy (I've only been to one meeting before this pandemic changed everything, but once it's over I'll be going back to group therapy when it resumes).

    Good luck in whatever you choose, and I hope you keep us updated. And remember: you are NOT alone. As long as there is someone who cares, there is hope.
     
  5. powercore01

    powercore01

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    holy **** man thanks, seriously. I have a personal problem(maybe even multiple) that I've also haven't discussed with anyone other than my psychiatrist. I'll keep posting as much as i can, and seriously, thanks for the advice man. I'm sure I'll have tons of time due to the pandemic lol
     
  6. powercore01

    powercore01

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    I swear man, i'm not trying to troll post, I just have poor grammar tbh. Either way, thanks for the advice. It's tough as hell to hear this but I'd rather have honesty and the ugly truth than a coddling lie. I'll see what I can do if since I'm unlikely to join now. maybe a cook or something?
     
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  7. rangerjd

    rangerjd

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    This is the best advice I've seen written on here. Read it, head it. Not all recruiters and doctors are the same, if one doesn't help you, then try and find another one that will.
    I had a young guy at my work who really wanted to join the Military, but he had screwed up in several areas when he was in high school and also had gotten a DUI in his early 20s. His drive and ambition were great, he talked with several recruiters, jumped through all the hoops, got several waivers, all of this took over 5 years, but he is now on active duty with the Airforce on a CCT team.
    What I'm trying to say is, never quit, never give up.
    Good job on your writing, by the way. Sorry, lol, I'm married to an English teacher. It's a pet peeve of mine.
     
  8. powercore01

    powercore01

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    NP I appreciate the criticism! Even the small things like my grammar are somewhat of wake up call(which I am going to work on to improve).I'll be putting aside my bias and ego to talk this out with my psychiatrist but i'm not gonna lie, it's going to suck big time confronting my past and current issues.
     
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  9. powercore01

    powercore01

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    ye
    damn, well to tell you the truth I didn't really think out the consequences if I even were able to join. I admit that I might have blocked out some parts of the reality I would face rather than seeing as it really is. thanks man seriously,I just felt like I had to get out of my own bubble and ask other people outside my worldview.
     
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  10. Keith E.

    Keith E.

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    Ah, welcome to the forum.

    Keith
     
  11. Highspeed93

    Highspeed93

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    I do not think it would be a good idea for you to join with all of those sort of problems, there is no shame in admitting your problems and not serving.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2020
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  12. willie_pete

    willie_pete NRA Life Member

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    Save yourself a lot of wasted time and effort now and choose another line of work.

    If you can get your stuff together before age 35 and still want to, you can try then.
     
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  13. Von Baren

    Von Baren

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    Maybe the Peace Corps?
     
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  14. Von Baren

    Von Baren

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    As a former Army Recruiter (97-01), it sounds like you would require a medical wavier at the Battlion-level. But, the wavier usually requires that 1. You are off your meds for x amount of months, then a follow-up examination at your own expense that gives you a clean bill of mental health. 2. There are four factors after that to get considered for a Battalion wavier. 1. You normally have to have a high ASVAB score. 2. Pick a critical needs MOS that you qualify for. 3. You are able to ship out ASAP. 4. Most waviers are granted in September time frame. The Army has to meet thier Quota by the end of september. When they are short, they will be approving pending waviers like hot cakes! Provided your ship out before October 1st.
     
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  15. R.B. Riddick

    R.B. Riddick

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  16. peng

    peng

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    If this thread is legit, you have good advice.

    If not, future Senator. :p