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Is it realistic that cops from different precincts get all hyped up about who gets credit for solving a case? I know it's just a TV series but they really play up the animosity between cops of different organizations.....
 

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Is it realistic that cops from different precincts get all hyped up about who gets credit for solving a case? I know it's just a TV series but they really play up the animosity between cops of different organizations.....
Generally, from my experience (20 yrs NYPD, 10 a detective), no.
 

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I have seen rivalries between departments with overlapping Jurisdictions. But seldom within individual depts.


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The Detectives in the Baltimore PD generally had a good relationship with Patrol. They would let patrol officers make the arrest (good for their stats)( and they would take the clearance (great for their stats) Win-Win.
 

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Is it realistic that cops from different precincts get all hyped up about who gets credit for solving a case? I know it's just a TV series but they really play up the animosity between cops of different organizations.....
When I was a young rookie I was pissed when two or three of the “press” collars were stolen from me when I was on patrol. As I got more experience, it was more about did I make overtime on it then getting credit.
 

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No. It’s tv non-sense. I have had the unfortunate task of working several murders recently, and it is a team effort of the highest order. All hands on deck for a murder investigation, even for a known suspect case. An unknown suspect case is usually going to involve multiple outside agencies as well depending on your agencies capabilities, State forensics, Marshalls, FBI etc....

It’s WAYYY too much work for one man handle effectively.

If any real cop ever *****ed to me about not getting credit for “the collar” like they do in TV I’d probably take him down a peg or two.

I’ve worked murder investigations where one officer did nothing but neighbor interviews, another scene security and crime scene log, another family interviews, another victims cell phone download, etc......

Every now and then an officer may make a breakthrough in a complicated case that leads to the arrest. Usually we will make sure he is the one that gets the cuffs and name on the arrest report.

Typically the officer whose name is at the bottom of the report spends the most time in cross examination in the stand whether he had that much involvement in how the case unfolded or not, so sometimes it’s best to let someone else have the “collar”.

Being subpoenaed for a murder trial can eat up the better part of a week, sometimes more. I’m usually happy to let the other guy take the credit.

We typically work anywhere from 0-12 murders per year so we don’t have a dedicated homicide division and the specialty capabilities that come with that.
 

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Glory hounds would not last long in the DB (Detective Bureau). Believe me there are enough collars to go around. Might there be a dick or two? Sure, but as I said, they won't last too long.
 

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No. It’s tv non-sense. ...

It’s WAYYY too much work for one man handle effectively. ...
When I was a child (well, it was a long time ago), I was a NYPD homicide detective (9th Homicide Zone, Bronx, 46, 47, 50, 52). Most homicide investigations would start out with the "catching" detective being the hub of a "wheel." The detective would (generally) remain at the scene, collating all the incoming information from the other detectives, the "spokes of the wheel," who would do the interviewing, canvassing, bringing evidence to the catching detective and other running around that went with such investigations.

Wouldn't make for great TV, but it sure helped in solving homicides. At that time in NYC history, we were having around 1,800 to 1,900 homicides a year in the city (2019 stats, 319 homicides in NYC). The city topped out at around 2,000 a year around 1990. Then came the gradual decline. I'm not even going to go into the possible whys of that happening. That'd take a damn book.

Anyway, we had good job security back then.

9th Homicide Zone office. L to R: Sgt. Bill Brady (WWII vet, B17 waist gunner), the guy with the beard, the extremely good looking, virile, intense one, that's me, Mike DeRosa, my partner. Played minor league baseball before becoming a cop, Bobbie Waters.


Murder weapon from one of Al Lyman's cases. Don't think we ever solved that one.


Oh and those SOBs had a sense of humor. This was tacked up on the bulletin board (the guy with the beard had been collared for a homicide).
 

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If we are going down memory lane, do you guys remember “skippy” in applicant processing?

To the guys who don’t know, he was older than dirt detective who would yell at the applicants as we went thru processing for the job calling everyone “Skippy” ; “Hey skippy , come over here” , “Hey skippy , go over there”

And my favorite,

To scare us he said with an old man’s finger pointing at us: “ The NYPD physical is fully qualifying for the draft “. Yes the draft. He had us rolling . This was the early 1990s-lol

Found this on A cop webpage - a whole thread about him-lol

upload_2020-4-28_21-3-26.jpeg
 

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We only care about arrests for the stats. I always used to say "a stat a day keeps the (fill in rank here) away."

Then a sergeant taught us a trick in our report writing software. If you put a comma after the arresting officer's name in the "arresting officer" space you could put your name in and get credit too if you did a supplement report. I think the problem is we ended up with more arresting officers than arrests so management started asking questions
 
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