close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Question for truck drivers.

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by jp3975, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. jp3975

    jp3975

    Messages:
    7,419
    Likes Received:
    484
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Location:
    Texarkana, Tx
    Ive been applying for jobs and always thought driving a truck might be an alright job.

    Steven's offered to put me through school with no money out of pocket with a job waiting.

    This is what they say pay is:

    $350 a week for 5 weeks training with a driver.

    $800 week when I drive alone.

    9 months $900

    1 year $1000

    If gone 3 weeks 3 days off....4 weeks 4 days off.

    My question is...Is that a good deal? Could i make much more if I paid for school out of pocket rather than signing a year contract and letting them pay for it??

    Any advice for a newb?
     
  2. glock509

    glock509

    Messages:
    599
    Likes Received:
    18
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Location:
    cartersville ga
    see if there is a tech college in your area that has truck driving courses. plus check around different companies. many offer training but those pay rates sound right starting off.
     

  3. Bill Powell

    Bill Powell Cross Member CLM

    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2002
    Location:
    dallas, tx
    since no major hauling company will hire a driver without a years experience it could be an okay deal. If you take that tech school course you're gonna have to drive for some second string company for a year at about those pay rates.

    I would check out the company making the offer as best you can
     
  4. glock_19guy1983

    glock_19guy1983

    Messages:
    2,555
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2002
    Location:
    dixie
    Stevens has somewhat of a bad reputation. Look to the local community colleges for a truck driving program and see about WIA(workforce in action) Its possible you will qualify for free tuition since they go on test scores instead of income. If you dont mind some hard work in exchange for more home time and money look to one of the flatbed companies. Most of them will get you home nearly every weekend and you live in a great area for flatbed companies to recruit from. Alot of flat companies will get you home nearly every weekend. Look into Builders transportation company, TMC transportation, McElroy truck lines and there are a few smaller ones just google flat bed starter companies. I worked for BTC for six months before I found a local job, They are a smaller company but a first class place to work. If one of the bottomfeeder companies like swift, stevens, or schnieder pay for your school you will more or less be an indentured servant until you get them paid off. PM me if you have any more questions.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  5. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

    Messages:
    6,620
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 1999
    Location:
    upper mid-west
    Did I miss it? What is your commitment to Steven's?
     
  6. jp3975

    jp3975

    Messages:
    7,419
    Likes Received:
    484
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Location:
    Texarkana, Tx
    I have no commitment. They made me an offer. Im leaning towards taking it unless someone talks me out of it.

    Seems like an ok deal. No money up front, for a years service. I'll work like a slave but if I dont like it after a year and cant transfer to a regional job then i can go elsewhere.
     
  7. jp3975

    jp3975

    Messages:
    7,419
    Likes Received:
    484
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Location:
    Texarkana, Tx
    Could you explain more in depth? I dont know anything about what you would do driving a flatbed that would be hard work.

    What do you do thats different from regular truck drivers?

    Workforce did mention something about paying for school. I'll look into it.
     
  8. jp3975

    jp3975

    Messages:
    7,419
    Likes Received:
    484
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Location:
    Texarkana, Tx
    Btw...I'll be away from the computer til Sunday night. Talk to you guys then.
     
  9. Ironbar

    Ironbar

    Messages:
    1,896
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2009
    Location:
    The GR8 ST8 of Orygun!
    This is absolutely NOT TRUE! Truck drivers are in very high demand all across the country. Reputable companies like John Cristner Trucking pay more than companies like the one you're talking about.

    Essentially what they are, are truck driving school "mills". They have literally dozens of people apply for their school knowing that the vast majority of them will wash out within the first week, month, then year. After a year, there are probably fewer than ten people left from the class you graduated with. C.R. England does the same thing. They will also hit you with hidden "fees" that they take out out of your pay per mile that other reputable companies do not. They will not tell you what they are for. They will press you to lease your own truck with the promise of greater money, then hit you with all sorts of hidden costs.

    Agree very strongly with the above comment about indentured servitude. Totally true.

    Proceed with extreme caution.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  10. glock_19guy1983

    glock_19guy1983

    Messages:
    2,555
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2002
    Location:
    dixie
    with flatbedding you will be securing loads with chains and binders and straps. you will also have to tarp most of the loads you get with tarps that weigh between 75 and 90lbs. Generally there is a tarp pay any time you have to tarp something. Some loads like big steel coils are quick and easy to chain and tarp but others like lumber and sheet metal buildings will be alot more trouble. Pay is generaly higher per mile starting out. expect around .35 a mile flatbedding and .26-28 for van and reefers. If Workforce will pay for your school, you are much better off going to one of the smaller starter flatbed companies. Go to the nearest truckstop around you and watch the trucks fuel. you wont see nearly as many fat flatbed drivers. You will get alot more exercise if that is important to you. With the bigger companies you are just a number on the qualcom and trying to get your dispatcher on the phone will be nearly impossible if you have a problem. I liked flatbedding but hated being away from home. If things ever got bad enough that I had to go back on the road BTC would be the first place I called.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  11. berto62

    berto62

    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    336
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Location:
    Alachua Fl
    This is truck driving:wow:

    You'll get fat, high blood pressure, stress, work with the most vile pieces of **** that ever breathed air and NOT be able to decapitate them. And that's just the ****** water drinking dispatchers. The ****tards on the highways are worse.


    It ain't Smokey and the Bandit out here.

    It IS however job security. If your priorities are feeding your family, giving your kids a chance at life, then it's valuable.

    If you think it's cool and a great way to see the country, you're a ****ing idiot.

    Expect to be gone from home 2-3 weeks at a time and home for about 2 days when you first start. Don't believe one single advertisement that you get weekends off. There is always just one more load that dispatch needs you to cover.

    Don't even think about getting one of them high paying teamster jobs or local gigs without experience or the ability to swallow. They just don't exist anymore. Most union shops are about 40 percent layed off.

    If you live south of the Ohio river, expect about 30 percent less wages. Money is on the east coast, so yes Francis, expect to see New York.

    Oh, and taking your wife on the road is a fast track to divorce. Unless both of you are less than 100 pounds, you ain't sleeping together. You won't be able to afford to feed her and she ain't gettin in the truck with you after 5 days without a shower.

    You WILL need to know how to read a map. GPS is a novelty toy out here that gets more people in trouble than it ever helps.

    DO NOT EVER BE CONVINCED THAT OWNING YOUR OWN TRUCK WILL MAKE YOU MORE MONEY. Takes plenty of experience to even have a half assed attempt at that. Anyone that says they are rich from driving for Prime is a drooling idiot that never made more money than a paper route.

    Recruiters are liars. Period. Do your own research.

    With the new regulations, unfortunately some place like Swift or Schneider is your best bet to start. You will never be better than meat in the seat and just another commodity like fuel or washer fluid to the corporate entity. What it will do, is give you valuable seat time to figure out what you'd rather do.
     
  12. glock_19guy1983

    glock_19guy1983

    Messages:
    2,555
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2002
    Location:
    dixie
    Berto, you make it sound so glamorous:rofl:
     
  13. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

    Messages:
    6,620
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 1999
    Location:
    upper mid-west
    I guess I wasn't clear. I meant, if you agree to their training.

    Then you DO have a commitment. One Year.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  14. Atomic Punk

    Atomic Punk

    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    919
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    i am actually just about finished up with the school part of a similar deal with a trucking company. turn in some paperwork to the local DMV monday and i'll be on the road next week sometime.
    lots of bad stories for most of the trucking companies, many more for the "we train you" ones. most probably somewhat true at least. i picked the one i found the fewest complaints about. im not expecting an awesome fun time, but its work and pays more than being a security guard.

    im also not expecting to make a career out of this. i got on the "to hire" list for a local electrical union and its looking like it will take a year or more to make it down the list.
     
  15. sombunya

    sombunya Use it up, throw it away

    Messages:
    5,675
    Likes Received:
    2,757
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    Location:
    Kookifornia
    I understand Texarkana isn't Los Angeles but here in So. Cal. HAZMAT drivers are making $60k-$80k/yr driving locally delivering gas, diesel, cryo liquid etc.

    I drove class 8 trucks for 27 years but didn't do much over-the-road or line hauling.
     
  16. Huaco Kid

    Huaco Kid

    Messages:
    14,425
    Likes Received:
    7,900
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Location:
    State
    I travel ~45 weeks / year. 75% is interstate driving. I've met a lot of truck drivers.

    They ARE the most miserable bunch of pissants you'll ever meet.

    Over seven years time, I've met two or three that have their ducks in a row and are making real money and seemed happy. They were all old guys.
     
  17. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

    Messages:
    12,577
    Likes Received:
    3,571
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 1999
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Get all info you can. As suggested go to area Vo Tech talk to them. Go onlline/or in person to other companies and find out what they "offer"
    What do YOU want? Home every weekend? Once a month? Live on road/no home address? Other??
    A buddy of mind makes a RV package for OTR. (what I call it) Its amazing how much stuff he puts in sleeper. Lots of drivers for music groups love them. (there is weight issue but IMO amazing little for what done)
    I drove short time. Leave Sunday home Friday. Two drivers (or log books) and you could do Monday PM to Thursday AM. ;)

    BTW I ment with two drivers you have two log books. Anything else would be breaking the rules.... I can drive 24hrs a day (legally) with a Dually pickup with 34' RV and larger legally. If I am getting paid the thought of money limites how long I can stay alert. (I guess)

    Locally I had two friends that went to truck driving school. One Vo Tech (had CDL 15 yrs ago just found it almost as easy to take course/have training/new equipment for test then trying to RENT truck trailer take test.) Also was told that if you have taken Vo Tech test the tester is easier then walk ins. (if true??? who knows)
    Other went with company paid training. Decided he did not like it. Have not heard what he has to pay back. Neither are driving OTR. Both passed.
     
  18. 4516

    4516 On the Beach

    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    WOW. Things have sure changed. After The USMC in late 60's I was hired with no truck driving experience by Consolidated Freightways. They sent me to a 3 week all expense paid school in Akron Ohio. They paid us a salary while in school, per diem for room and board and full cost of school. There also was no obligation as to how long we needed to work for CF.

    Drove out of Chicago. Ran sleeper wheel to East Coast, then got on Sleeper wheel to West Coast. Then got to bid Extra board. Liked that best. Drove sleepers both East and west and a lot of single man runs up from 50 to 400 miles one way.

    We were Teamsters Local 710. Did it for 3 years. Never backed a truck up or unloaded one. We just drove out of yard and into yard and shut it off. Yard man (hostler) unhooked, hooked up, fueled, turned rig around to face exit gate.

    Drove mostly doubles West and only single trailer East. Chicago to Boston usually took about 48 hours R/T. Other E destinations took less time. Likewise Chicago to LA took 41/2 to 5 days R/T. Other W bound took less. Always had 1 to as much as 3 days off between trips. Also few interstate runs. Spent lots of time running the humps in Penn Sate

    Was making $17,000 a year or a little better. Based on Real Estate values then and now. To make the same purchasing power a driver should be making $150,000 a year. Bought new Buick for $5500. 1/3 of annual income. Can't do that now.

    Ran paper logs, if truck broke down, we called it in and went on the clock for hourly pay till fixed. Tractors were a lot more Spartan than now. The guys with the fancy tractors were paid a lot less than we were and were gone away from home longer and had to load and unload.

    Not gloating just telling how it used to be a long time ago in a another Century.

    Left the trucks when I got married. Went into Real Estate and never looked back.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  19. 4516

    4516 On the Beach

    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    WOW. Things have sure changed. After The USMC in late 60's I was hired with no truck driving experience by Consolidated Freightways. They sent me to a 3 week all expense paid school in Akron Ohio. They paid us a salary while in school, per diem for room and board and full cost of school. There also was no obligation as to how long we needed to work for CF.

    Drove out of Chicago. Ran sleeper wheel to East Coast, then got on Sleeper wheel to West Coast. Then got to bid Extra board. Liked that best. Drove sleepers both East and west and a lot of single man runs up from 50 to 400 miles one way.

    We were Teamsters Local 710. Did it for 3 years. Never backed a truck up or unloaded one. We just drove out of yard and into yard and shut it off. Yard man (hostler) unhooked, hooked up, fueled, turned rig around to face exit gate.

    Drove mostly doubles West and only single trailer East. Chicago to Boston usually took about 48 hours R/T. Other E destinations took less time. Likewise Chicago to LA took 41/2 to 5 days R/T. Other W bound took less. Always had 1 to as much as 3 days off between trips

    Was making $17,000 a year or a little better. Based on Real Estate values then and now. To make the same purchasing power a driver should be making $150,000 a year. Bought new Buick for $5500. 1/3 of annual income. Can't do that now.

    Ran paper logs, if truck broke down, we called it in and went on the clock for hourly pay till fixed. Tractors were a lot more Spartan than now. The guys with the fancy tractors were paid a lot less than we were and were gone away from home longer and had to load and unload.

    Not gloating just telling how it used to be a long time ago in a another Century.

    Left the trucks when I got married. Went into Real Estate and never looked back.
     
  20. shotgunred

    shotgunred local trouble maker

    Messages:
    9,125
    Likes Received:
    1,401
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Location:
    Washington (the state)
    If you want to drive for a living you should check out your local transit agency.

    • home every night.
    • medical Insurance.
    • dental insurance
    • 401K
    • Payed vacation.
    • Payed training.
    • Home every night.