Question about wedding photography

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by jmg, Jul 10, 2007.

  1. jmg

    jmg UCantFixStupid

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    Hey, all. I got wrangled into helping a friend shoot another friend's daughter's wedding. Inside a big, 800 seat chapel/sanctuary.

    I have a D200 with a Tamron LD XR DiII SP 17-50 f2.8, a Nikon f3.3-5.6 28-80 G lens (came w/ my N80 kit), a Nikon 50mm f1.8 D lens, and a Nikon 70-300 f4-5.6 G lens (N80 kit). I also have a Nikon SB-600 flash with a Sto-Fen diffuser.

    A few questions--

    Should I shoot in RAW or JPEG/fine? I'm wondering where they (bride/groom) are going to have the images processed, so I'm wondering if RAW will be read where they go. I'd like to shoot in RAW, to capture the most detail/sharpness.


    Thanks!
     
  2. sjfrellc

    sjfrellc CLM

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    Raw is not going to have more detail/sharpness. It will give you more lattitude in case your exposure is off and you need to postprocess the photo. Wedding portraits as a rule are not all "sharp" as opposed to slightly diffused. I wouldn't experiment with it unless you are comfortable with it but you might use Optimize image portrait mode for portraits (and remember to reset).
    Your Nikon d200 allows you to have one JPEG Fine(less compression)plus a Raw file of each picture if you set the Qual on Raw Fine. The only reason not to use raw files is if it takes up too much disk space on the Compactflash card. I believe it takes about 10MB per picture in Raw and about 1.5 MB in JPEG

    It's going to be your lenses and lighting that makes the difference
    to your shots rather than whether you use Raw or JPEG. Mostly because your D200 has a great mind (computer) processing the Raw into a JPEG.

    I have never taken official wedding photos, but have been very pleased with the D70 or D200 and SB-600 flash at wedding reception candids.
     

  3. eskram

    eskram Guest

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    This is a great read:

    http://www.aljacobs.com/NEW WEDDING.pdf

    I'm not sure of your experience level, but I do caution you in shooting a friend's wedding if you're not a professional, or very experienced in wedding photography. I've heard horror stories of angry, disappointed brides that expected professional-looking photographs on-the-cheap from a brother/friend/uncle who owns a DSLR. It's hard to re-shoot a one-time event.
     
  4. nipperwolf

    nipperwolf

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    sorry, but your wrong.

    RAW images that are saved as TIFFs are much sharper than those that are saved as jpegs.

    btw, this is from someone who shoots 90% in jpeg. ;)

    if you're shooting important like a wedding, you shoot it in RAW.

    case closed. ;)
     
  5. eskram

    eskram Guest

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    Most cameras apply some sort of in-camera sharpening and color correction to them when they create a jpeg, which is why they appear better out of the box. RAW is just that, raw camera data - untouched in all respects.

    If you compare a .jpg to an unprocessed RAW image, the .jpg will probably appear crisper. However, if you process the RAW image correctly, it will look better every time.

    RAW also affords more correction ability without negatively effecting the end image. The downside is that you will spend more time post-processing though.

    Unless it's something vital, I shoot jpeg.
     
  6. Razor

    Razor Millennium Member

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