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I've worked side by side with BP, I was trained by them in police bicycle patrol(IPMBA certification), I know some personally, I tested to be one in the late '80s and I know fellow officers who were in BP, but left and came to our agency.

BP was too late getting back to me so went local LE. From what I know generally, I probably would have had a positive career since they are involved in so much AND so many duty stations. They have aircraft, ATVs, horses, bicycles, boats and who knows what else to keep you interested.

But yes, BP is looked at by many as a way to get their foot into federal LE. US Marshal Service is the one agency most desired in my neck of the woods.
 

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I respect the Border Patrol officers I occasionally see when I make trips to the Rio Grande Valley. You gotta be dedicated to work in the desert Southwest or cold vastness's of the US/Canadian border. I'm puzzled anyone would think of that agency as a 'starter' job for Federal law enforcement. That's ignorant, like saying the U S Coast Guard is a starter job for the U S Navy.:flag:
 

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King Cluck is a fake BP agent......


Not to hijack the thread, but Bill Jordan's "No second place winner" gives some interesting insight into what being a BP agent was like in the 50's 60's...really the wild west with many of the same issues facing them today...only more hi-tech

and Bill Jordan negligently shot and killed a fellow agent while working for the USBP

https://www.cbp.gov/about/in-memoriam/john-rector


If that tells you anything
 

· Cheese?
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This is exactly the sense I got from the couple former CBP guys I worked with at another large well-known federal agency.

Per my conversations with them, it's both a relatively large agency and one with a fair amount of turnover, so simple math creates a fairly sizable hiring opportunity.

Get hired, go through FLETC, and do your first assignment or two in the field on the Mexican border.

Do well there, and you then can start thinking about better CBP jobs or lateral transfer to other agencies. One guy explicitly defined 'better' CBP positions in terms of % of your day you spend in air conditioned environments and the quality of said air-conditioning.

By logical extension, being out on ATV's sounds to me like something for newbie agents on their first assignment or those who've ticked off a supervisor.
 

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On a more serious note I have heard for decades now there is a lot of turnover. Doesn't matter who is in the White House there is a certain amount of Groundhog Day that ruins it.

That and guess where they are spending most of their career?

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
That is why I transferred to the Northern Border many, many moons ago.
 

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Is it possible that from say about 27 years old to 37 years old one bounces around in the dessert on an ATV and then sometime around 37 or maybe 40 one may begin to gravitate to a Border Patrol boat or a Border Patrol van that takes illegals from point A to point B after in custody or maybe a Border Patrol position someplace on the northern border because the snowmobile looks cooler (pun intended) than the ATV or even a Border Patrol station someplace that one may not immediately think of as a border state? Like the one at the general aviation airport not to far away from me in Florida if they really hate the cold weather?
There are so many opportunities today in the Border Patrol. Yes, you can do it all. I was one of the first in El Paso to work ATV's in the early 90's and one of the first to run the FLIR cameras.
 

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A friend of mine in missiles, Fred Capio, got out of Titan and joined the BP. He stayed until he retired five years ago. He seemed to enjoy it and tried to get me to join a few times when they were looking for people. He was a SA working on human and drug trafficking in Texas. Helped design a BP Randell 14 knife for them.

Spent some time as an firearms instructor @FLETC

Died a few years ago.

RIP Fred, you were a good friend.

:flag:
 

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By logical extension, being out on ATV's sounds to me like something for newbie agents on their first assignment or those who've ticked off a supervisor.
Quite the opposite, ATV and horse patrol are coveted. I enjoyed the ATV's in El Paso, the desert heat will get you without water but it is WAY better than the heat and humidity in the valley.

Had quite the running gun battle one night with some train robbers back and forth to Mexico. Me and another Agent saved the lives of some Mexican cops that night.
 

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Quite the opposite, ATV and horse patrol are coveted. I enjoyed the ATV's in El Paso, the desert heat will get you without water but it is WAY better than the heat and humidity in the valley.

Had quite the running gun battle one night with some train robbers back and forth to Mexico. Me and another Agent saved the lives of some Mexican cops that night.
The details would be a interesting story
 

· packin heat
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Most of the ones here on the northern border are older. I think they start down there then transfer up here
Yes sir. Any of the ones I run into in an around the Buffalo/ Niagara area have all spent seven or eight years working at the southern border.
 

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Yes sir. Any of the ones I run into in an around the Buffalo/ Niagara area have all spent seven or eight years working at the southern border.
When I was going through the process, it was made known that every new agent would start on the Southern border. Hence the requirement to learn Spanish in the academy and the need to test as able to learn a foreign language during the initial BP entrance exam.
 

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About 4-5 years after reading Joseph Wambaugh’s then-newly published “Lines and Shadows” and developing some fascination for the SW Border, I joined the Border Patrol and wound up working in the same areas where the book took place. I spend six years and with the patrol before moving on. At the time, I would say that probably a third of the agents I worked with were motivated to use the patrol as a stepping stone. A fair number were hired from South Texas, had been local cops, and saw the patrol as an opportunity for better pay and retirement. They brought some good experience to the table. Of the two thirds who didn’t necessarily plan on ending their careers any other place but with the patrol, there were those who didn’t like where they were first posted, and at the time, the Border Patrol, and especially the INS, were not not good at making transfers feasible. At the busier line stations, it was virtually impossible to get transferrred somewhere else after you’d “done your time.” The continuous the work load, archaic tactics that were mundane and mind numbing, thoroughly trashed vehicles and equipment, etc, made some guys and gals willing to seek transfers to INS/Customs inspections, or back to state/local jobs to get out of Southern California. At the time, a number of senior management had done time as immigration inspectors. At the time, it was seen as a career path even though they left the covered retirement plan for a while. Most ended up transferring back directly into supervisory positions. I really wanted to become an 1811 criminal investigator, or at least get assigned to the sector anti smuggling unit but the reality was bleak. INS HQS wanted to prevent a mass exodus from the patrol to open 1811 positions, and pretty much blocked us from direct application. The only path open was through USA Jobs. The INS’ “career points” system was flawed and the anti smuggling jobs required a high number of them. It was downright difficult to get the necessary assignments, temporary duties, or training necessary to receive points when you worked a line station where illegal crossing traffic was high. Management’s thoughts were that you were needed on the line, not in training, not on a TDY assignment elsewhere. Implementation of a new operational plan brought some fulfilling career opportunities for me, but I was also wise or cynical enough at the time to understand that it couldn’t last... and didn’t and I was back sitting parked along the fence watching it rust. I gracefully moved onto another organization. I do see that some of the young kids who came on during the time I was starting to look elsewhere are now chiefs or senior management. I don’t regret the path I followed. I got some great uniformed law enforcement experience from the Border Patrol.
 
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