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Discussion Starter #1
I religiously clean my G44 and G19 after every visit to the range. I use CLP, a bore brush, and patches.
Another thread on leading in the barrel of a G44 got me thinking about something. Is there any reason that the cleaning has to be done as soon as possible or just before shooting again? I figure it is more relevant here since the 9mm is always FMJ or JHP whereas the .22lr is copper washed.
Also, is there anything different when cleaning a .22lr revolver? Do I clean the cylinder or just the barrel?
 

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Many shooters wait to clean .22's till they no longer function, as long as it stays dry it don't matter when you clean it. Most .22 pistols will go 500 rounds before they EF up. If using your G19 for carry or home defense you should clean it asap after range use. For revolvers you must clean each chamber along with barrel, a ridge builds up in each chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So is there some detrimental effect of not cleaning it asap or are we just saying an EDC should always be in peak readiness condition?
 

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No there is not any problem with not cleaning ASAP with modern non corrosive ammo. I usually don't field strip and clean my center fire pistols until after 4-5 range trips though I do wipe down metal exterior parts shortly after getting home (within a few days) with a cotton patch to put a very light coat of CLP on it. IMHO maintaining proper lubrication is more important that keeping a pistol squeaky clean all the time. As far as my rimfire pistols though I do clean feed ramp to the chamber after each range session with QTips and the breechface/bolt face which only takes maybe a minute and does not require field stripping.
 

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Is there any reason that the cleaning has to be done as soon as possible or just before shooting again?
Yea, to just get it over with, so I don't have to do it later in a rush before going shooting again.
 

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Thing is they are your guns, so do what ever makes you happy. I don't know who makes up all of these rules that I keep hearing about how to and when to clean a gun, but I don't listen to them. In my opinion most of them are wrong. I run my open gun (9mm Major) all season long without cleaning it and it functions just fine. On my precision rifles, once the barrel is seasoned I don't clean them until the accuracy falls off. This is what I do. Not saying it is right or wrong. Your guns, do what ever makes you happy!
 

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The internal areas of a rimfire firearm that are susceptible to the buildup of powder residue generated by any blowback operated .22LR firearm will get dirty quickly, and unless you purposely like to spend unnecessary amounts of time chipping away at this buildup then by all means don't clean them until they stop functioning.

I prefer to take the time to clean my firearms after each use, especially my rimfires. It gives me the opportunity to check over and inspect their major components for signs of premature wear, loose fitting parts, etc., in an effort to prevent failures and unnecessary repair costs in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Frankly, I find it quite therapeutic to clean my pistols.
If I can't shoot every day I can at least clean after each session and dry fire until its time to head out again.
I just got a Heritage Rough Rider with the 4.75" barrel. A fun little gun to plink with. A totally different experience than my G44. Best of all, it will shoot even the cheapest ammo (nice bonus these days).
 

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Frankly, I find it quite therapeutic to clean my pistols.
If I can't shoot every day I can at least clean after each session and dry fire until its time to head out again.
I just got a Heritage Rough Rider with the 4.75" barrel. A fun little gun to plink with. A totally different experience than my G44. Best of all, it will shoot even the cheapest ammo (nice bonus these days).
I clean my G44 after every range trip but I don’t think it’s always necessary. Same goes for my M9, actually. For me, I like to know they’ll be ready just in case but from a practical standpoint I don’t want to put it off and then get ready for my next range trip and realize I never got around to doing it then have to take time to clean it before I go.
 

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Many people who advocate the “clean it every time you shoot” to white glove inspection standards usually fall into one of 2 categories:
Old military vets who had gun cleaning beat into them in basic training
Those raised by old school shooters who grew up in the era of corrosive priming ( corrosive primed ammo has not been a mainstream commercial product in over half a century or more.)
Back in the corrosive era neglecting a gun could quickly cause rust and damage but that era is very much long gone.
If you don’t think you can trust your carry gun when it is dirty, you should probably replace your carry gun. If your defensive gun won’t run when dirty that is a problem.
22’s do tend to get dirty faster due to the ammo type and might need more cleaning to maintain reliability.
Despite decades of military service I never was brainwashed to be a gun cleaning freak, having been a gun person long before military service.
It takes me less than 5 minutes to clean a gun, even if I have used corrosive primed ammo ( such as old military surplus - which is defined as World War Two era or older) or even black powder.
 

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I run a bore snake through my barrel and wipe it down. I clean the feed ramp like Swipter and maybe put a little oil on the rails.
 

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Some people do not take cleaning, and proper lubrication seriously. That is fine if it's a range gun. If it is a daily carry do it like you life might depend upon it. COULD.
 

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I clean mine after every use. But I fall into the “old guys with military” but also the NRA Basic Pistol recommendation.

Is it absolutely necessary? Of course not. But I like knowing all my pistols are clean, properly lubed and maintained. Just personal preference.
 

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YEABUTT....back when I worked at CSI in Miami, this guy named Speed never cleaned his gun, He was wounded once when his Sig would not fire. He was warned by my boss Lt. H that he better start cleaning his gun. He never listened and a few months later Speed bought the farm... I will always miss Speed.
 

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YEABUTT....back when I worked at CSI in Miami, this guy named Speed never cleaned his gun, He was wounded once when his Sig would not fire. He was warned by my boss Lt. H that he better start cleaning his gun. He never listened and a few months later Speed bought the farm... I will always miss Speed.
It seems “Speed” was a little “slow” on the uptake.
 

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Did I read it wrong or did the review in Guns Magazine say Glock recommends cleaning it every 100 rounds?
 

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From the owners manual:

Your GLOCK pistol should be cleaned and lubricated as follows:
1. when brand new, before first time it is fired, plus
2. after each time it is fired, plus
3. as required. This will be determined by your pistol's exposure to adverse conditions during storage or use such as rain, snow, perspiration, salt water, dirt, dust, lint, etc. Additionally, your pistol should be cleaned and inspected if it has been dropped or if any broken parts are suspected or malfunctions experienced, plus
4. at least every 100 rounds fired ensuring protection against your firearm jamming or losing accuracy.
 

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So.......if I go to the range for 500 rounds I have to clean it five times, and four times at the range? That's overkill if using good ammo but what do I know. I have an opinion on everything, just ask me.
 
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