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Question about a bass-fishing rig

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Snafu, Oct 14, 2003.

  1. Snafu

    Snafu Millennium Member

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    I have been into fishing since I've been about ten. I've always used a spinning rod/reel for the types of fishing I do, which is mainly bass, panfish and trout. Lately a bait-casting rig seems to be calling my name.

    Is there any reason to use such a rig, or is this merely a reason to spend more money? If there is a good reason, and maybe if there isn't, can someone give me good pointers on how to choose a rod and reel combonation? My current stable of spinning equipment varies from ultralight to medium action rods, 5' to 6'6" in length and I usually use from 6-10 lbs. test line. Occasionally I will use 4 lb. for a day of panfish only fishing, but most of the time I'm too lazy to change line and just use what I have. A couple days ago I was not having any luck with bass, changed bait, and caught some bluegills as small as 5" on 10 lb. test!

    So anyway, give me some do's and don'ts about bait-casting rigs, please.

    Thanks for any help!

    Dave
     
  2. tjpet

    tjpet

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    Casting reels hold more heavy test line and throw easier. They're also better suited for tough work where you have to horse fish out or lose them. This is important to a tournament pro but isn't a necessity for the everyday angler unless you work a lot of water under the same conditions they do.

    I use spinning outfits for 99% of my fishing. But for nighttime use there's nothing better for muscling a 15lb. channel cat out of a cattail/debris choked hole I can think of then a casting rod & reel combo.
     

  3. noway

    noway

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    Line capacity is not an issue.

    Both spinning and bait-casting both have big bell/spools for holding alot of line.

    Bait-cast gives greater control with casting for accurate bait placement and bait entry in the water.

    Most of the pros uses bait-casting but spining or spin-cast is just as good for landing fish and requires less operator knowledge and control.

    I like both and use both equally but the bait-casting is my first choice unless I have light lures and specially if casting into the mild/heavy winds. Also line diameter and weights will effect casting and control also.

    So you have to pick what you want. My current setups are Shimano Curado , Quantum accurist 501 and Quantum snapcast for spin.

    all of them have their pros & cons.
     
  4. striderglock

    striderglock HVACR

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    Unless it's light line for panfish I use a baitcaster. Spinning reels have a tendency to twist the line and cause problems at times. Baitcasters are allow you more control over everything.

    I only use ambassador 5500's. Since they upgraded their reels a few years ago they are a steal at $60. For the features and smoothness other reels sell for $80+ easily. No fancy new gizmos, just a straight forward solid reel. The glock of baitcasters.;f

    Basspro has a combo with your choice of ambassador and basspro rod. I always get the 5500 and 7" rod, usually around $100-110. A real bargain over buying them seperately.
     
  5. TriggerTripper

    TriggerTripper

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    I agree with tjpet and noway. I use spin casting gear 99% of the time. Usually I'll only use a bait caster when I'm fishing from a boat with leaded line or dragging heavy lure setups like pop-gear or worm harnesses. Bait casters have better drag systems (typically) for horsing around big fish in tight places. I stick with spin casters when working with light wieght tackle anything under 3/4 ounce and finessing plastics in shallow water. If you get along good with your spin caster stick with it.

    If you want to try a bait caster pay the money for a good one up front, the Shimano Curado is top of the line but some of their less expensive models are good too, as are several of the quantums, I'd expect to pay at least $100 - $120 for a decent one. Rod length is mostly user preference, a longer rod will give more solid jerks but the longer the rod the less the sensitivity. If it we're my first bait caster and I didn't want to drop a lot of green I'd suggest a shimano in the $100 dollar range mounted on nice 6'6 or 7 foot Fenwick rod. I like fishing for gear almost as much as for fish

    TT
     
  6. Snafu

    Snafu Millennium Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. I believe I'll borrow a friends set-up and see if I like it before spending any cash. Some of my snobby friends feel you just aren't a fisherman if you don't use a baitcasting rod/reel.

    I just like catching fish.