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Quail w/o Dogs

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Hoingshiba, Nov 6, 2004.

  1. Hoingshiba

    Hoingshiba willhunt4food

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    I am going to be starting my quail season here soon, hunting ditchbank areas, with brush and such. I have seen lots of quail there before while setting up for coyotes in the mornings. What is the best way to stalk/flush the little guys without dogs? Any tips? has anybody ever used a quail locator call?
     
  2. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    Like you I don't have any hunting dogs. I've only been hunting quail for a few years, but here's what I've learned.

    Down here all of the quail (gambel's and california are the 2 I've seen) are runners. I can hear them in the morning and have used a locator call to varying degrees of success. They chirp pretty good on their own in the early morning. The area I hunt is a few thousand acres of rolling desert scrub. About a billion places to hide in all directions.

    I walk kind of slow and try to stay relatively quiet. Following my ears mostly. Without a dog to pin them down, a lot of times they'll just run away rather than flush or flush out of range. They fly fast and low and don't stop moving when they hit the ground. Usually they'll fly 50 yards or so then run another 30 yards (guessing).

    One thing I've noticed is that after the covey breaks up, they almost immediately start to regroup. Most of the time in the same place. If I can find a 100 acre sized area that's holding a few coveys, I'll make big looping figure 8's through it back and forth. That gives time for the coveys I've flushed to regroup and settle down before I get back on them again. At least that's my theory.

    Without dogs it's kind of like Moses wandering around the desert. I've hunted them with dogs a few times and it's a world of difference. But the walk is always nice and sometimes they flush just right and I don't miss.
     

  3. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    Since you're in Washington, I'd have to assume that DemocRATs are plentiful where you live. Have you thought about trying to train a DemocRAT as a quail dog? (I don't mean to be denigrating dogs, but there must be SOMETHING that a DemocRAT's good for.)
     
  4. Hoingshiba

    Hoingshiba willhunt4food

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    Although WA is definately considered a liberal-Crat state, the area I am from and hunt is quite republican (gun loving farmers mostly), which means I would have to import a quality democrat from the westside, and the hassle of all the transfer fees and permits for democrat transfers isn't worth it. Plus, you cant teach an old 'Rat new tricks, right? I do have some pretty stupid friends I could train though...
     
  5. noway

    noway

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    here's my thoughts

    IN most of the public hunting I go to, the ground is tight with cover and a dog is pretty much no better than a 2legged human.

    Open terrain, fields, & pastures the dog becomes more usefull and is required. You get a good flush dog, that gets the birds up and off the ground can be very helpfull. Most of the bobwhites in my area, will run when the oppurtunity exist , vrs flying.
     
  6. Esox357

    Esox357

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    What type of quail are they? If bobwhite qual than just walk slowly and stop every 15-25 steps for about 5-7 seconds. If gambels or scale quail they probably run like hell. If you are flushing them while deer hunting I would probably use the same routine you are doing and modify it if problems arise. Esox357
     
  7. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    "Real" quail hunters appreciate the dogs as much, if not more, than shooting quail. I live smack dab in the middle of the bobwhite quail hunting capital of the world. There are lots of thick, briar-laden areas here where dogs are invaluable in finding birds. Good quail dogs "hold"; they don't flush quail. Good quail dogs also point as backup to their peers, when they see another dog point.

    "Walking up" quail just isn't "quail hunting" to me. :)
     
  8. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    There's no mule drawn carts through the trees out here. Hell, there's no trees. ;f The tradition of the old south ends before it hits Texas. The desert kind of ripped that old British tradition out of people. No history of a crew of slaves and servants catering to the gentry, just some dust 'ole cowpokes with whiskey on their breath.
     
  9. noway

    noway

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    ROFLMAO on that.


    I never seen a quail dog "hold" only. I think mpol777 sum it up with different quail species reacts different and requires a total different approach when it comes times for hunting them. Some species has more needs for a dog then others. You don't hunts desert or cali quail the same as a bowhite in it's natural terrain or at least that's how it has been for me.
     
  10. TexAg

    TexAg

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    Some of the best dogs I have hunted over quail with were owned by a gentleman who moved here to Texas from N. Carolina and those dogs HOLD on a point and the other dogs honor the pointing dogs point. After that, you get up to the dog, get ready, and walk forward and flush those quail. Theses are bob-whites around here though, and I do hear Blue Quail run quite a bit more. I've heard the use of a hawk call though will keep them hidden.
     
  11. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    You Texans don't have slaves??!!! HORSESCHICT! Who the hell picks your cotton?
     
  12. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    I'm no Texan. My waist is too small for belt buckles of that size, so I just passed through and set up camp in Arizona. ;f I'm not sure exactly who is picking our cotton because I don't speak Spanish, but I have a good guess. ;)

    It's probably for the best that regional traditions stay where they are. It'd just get messed up in the translation. You should see what they call duck hunting out here.
     
  13. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    FWIW, neither I nor any of my friends or relatives have owned slaves for seveal decades now.

    Except for the "phony" quail hunts on the primarily-Northern-owned "plantations"(some of them still use wagons and mules), dog hunting is done from horseback, on foot, or four-wheel-drive vehicle. Most of the quail "hunting" (I use that word guardedly) is done of pen-raised birds. Not much of a challenge. I'd NEVER shoot pen-raised quail.