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Q: Raccoons

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by noway, Dec 18, 2002.

  1. noway

    noway

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    1.Have anybody been able to succesfully hunt raccoons without the aid of a dog? Any suggestions,tips or methods.

    2.Can humans acquire rabies thru eating a rabid raccoon meat? I have no plans on trying raccoons but was curious.

    3.Anybody have suggestion in skinning their pelts? Everybody I've spoken too have told me their skin is alot tuffer than other smaller animals and harder to cut?
     
  2. Michigun

    Michigun Miss Michigan?

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    I've had very good luck with just a flashlight & a gun. It works pretty well the 1st few times but after that they get wise & won't look at the light anymore.

    My favorite "coon setup" is my G19 converted to .22LR with the help of my AACK. I have Mep night sights on top of the AACK & my M3 light rides the "dust shield" of the G19's frame.

    It works very well & it's legal in MI even!
     

  3. nezlab99

    nezlab99 Goldmember

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    Try baiting an are with a few cans of sardines about an hour before sunset. Come with a spot light and your favorite gun. They'll usually run up a tree if one's around. Make damn sure that if you hit one or knock it out of the tree not to let it fall anywhere near you. Personally, I wouldn't let my dog anywhere near a raccoon (jack russel terrier, she'd get whooped).
     
  4. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

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    Raccoons like water. Find a stream, pond, or lake with a gentle slope down to the water's edge, even if it's muddy (the raccoons don't mind). Check for tracks with long, boney-looking finger-like projections; that's a raccoon. If you can find the spot where they come down to the water initially, they usually are treed-up (in a hollow tree/log) nearby. Find a spot to get comfortable starting about an hour before sundown, settle-in, and sit still! They will start stirring near sundown, and often you can get a shot while they're still in the tree, or approaching the water's edge. A .22 HP is all you need if you place the shot well.

    I have a taxidermist who takes them off my hands before skinning; saves me some time and a mess, and he doesn't have to worry about a newbie-skinner (me) butchering a hide. It costs me a few bucks, but it's worth it, in my view.
     
  5. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

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    Noway,

    You ought to try skinning a bager my friend! their tuffer than a boot and then some.

    We run coons for fun, "just to tree them," out here on the ranch, with a blue tick hound....

    like someone else here suggested about the sardines.. dead fish and such will work around a pond.."fresh dead" ... fruit does to.. the "major" problem with this is, you get shunks, armidillos, possum, and everthing else down to kangaroo rats for the fruit.

    If you "squawl" like a coon with your mouth, or buy a manufactured one, you may scare up one or two at night without a dog.

    But,...I can tell you this for "sure"...a cassette recording of a 'wounded bird,' like those from Burnum Brothers, in Marbles Falls, Tx. played through a little recorder, will flat bring a coon to you at night, and especially around a small water hole.. it does work!

    Works on bobcats and coyotes as well..give it a try, if your "dogless," this is truly your best hope.

    Have Fun

    CanyonMan
     
  6. m65swede

    m65swede

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    1. Back in the 70's when coon fur prices were good, we hunted corn cribs and abandoned farm houses. Coons seem to have an affinity for old houses. The corn cribs were full of corn, so a coon family could move in and literally live on top of its food supply.

    We used flashlights and .22 pistols, since corn crib access was via a small, enclosed vertical ladder. Flashlight in one hand and Ruger in a shoulder holster. Peek over the top, scan for eyeballs, and shoot.

    2. I doubt that rabies transmits easily by eating it, but who would want to? More dangerous would be skinning/gutting, especially if you had an open wound on your hands.

    3. We never skinned our coons at all as our fur buyer preferred to do it himself. We simply hung the dead ones in a shed in cold weather or threw them in an old deep freeze in warmer times, then sold them whole.

    FWIW, our best night in terms of $$ per hour was one in which my hunting partner and I got 2 big adults and 4 young ones in a single corn crib. $50 each for adults, $25 each for youngsters = $200 in about 15 minutes. This was in the late 1970's.

    Swede
     
  7. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

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    Yup, those were the good 'ole days...