Putting metal sights on Glocks...

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by PA45ACP, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. PA45ACP

    PA45ACP A member

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    Will a little brass hammer and a brass punch/drift work, or is it a better, safer idea to spend the $80.00 for a rear sight tool?

    Only have enough money left after buying my glock to buy the sights. If I need the tool, I will have to wait awhile. Unless I can find a place around me who will put them on for me...

    Opinions would be helpful.

    :wavey:
     
  2. .40calPower

    .40calPower .40s&w rocks!!

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    I clamped my slide into a vice with wooden shims on both sides so the teeth of the vice wouldn't scratch the finish on the slide. I then cut a V-shaped notch into a piece of wood so the sight wood sit inside of it. Then I pushed the sight in slowly measuring often to make sure it was centered properly. Worked just as well as a sight tool and cost nothing.
     

  3. ecmills

    ecmills I shoot guns.

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    That's how I do it. 6" long scraps of 1/4" plywood and a vise. Installed 3 sets of Glock sights so far that way.

    Skip the brass. It's softer than the slide and the sight, but still hard enough to scuff the finish on the sights. Go down to home depot or lowes and buy a length of hardwood dowel rod, about 1/4" or 3/8" in diameter. Cut off 2 or 3 6" pieces to use as punches. 3 feet of that stuff is pretty cheap.

    After driving the old sight off and pushing the new one most of the way in, the first wooden punch might begin to splinter. Chuck it and cut yourself a new one. :)

    Make CERTAIN to use red loctite on the front sight's screw. It will come loose if you use blue, and you'll probably lose the sight entirely if you don't use any. Ask me how I know. Mine get the wiggle test before each stage of every match. It's never come loose again, but I'm paranoid about it now.
     
  4. PA45ACP

    PA45ACP A member

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    Thank you very much. I knew there had to be a cheap way around the sight tool, one that was just as good. THanks a bunch folks.
     
  5. Speedrock

    Speedrock "To The Point"

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    Re front sight install, some mfg's. make them to max. dimensions so may have to file-fit to slides oval. Then with ANY Loctite good surface prep is what determines it's strength! Blue #242 will hold forever if done correctly. Use red #271 if you don't intend to remove the sight as it has the bonus of an adhesive in it where #242 does not. Red needs heat to remove and hot enough to liquefy but it's only ca. 300 degrees F. Simple Isopropyl Alcohol or on the threads of that thin-head "Screw" and female threads inside the sight proper will get same clean enough. Apply with the tip of a PIN, not the tube of bottle applicator, as very little is needed to perform its use, plus too much may force air and fluid up into the cavity under the actual trit. vial and damage it.

    Make sure the sight is parallel with the slide by laying it on its side on something flat before snugging down! If it's loose in the oval may use Red #271 to "glue" it into same & blue on the threads or your choice as above. Wipe the excess off with a Q-Tip then tap the slid with any metal object like a small hammer just to set off enough vibration to help the Loctite to seep if it hasn't already and allow a full 24 hours curing time before shooting the pistol and you will have a PERMANENT installation that will last as long as you want the sight on your pistol.

    The others have covered the rear sight well, but can run into need for file-fitting, especially with some of the newer & harder steel sights.
    A small 60 degree sight-file in "Fine" {avail from Brownell's} will always be better than trying to beat the sight in, if it does not tap in fairly easily, using the bench vise & dowel/brass rod method mentioned. Never have to remove much metal at all just a few swipes on ea. surface of the sights dovetail. OIL IT, it either way!

    A good rule of thumb: If the sight is going to fit Glocks
    goofy "Hour-Glass" dovetail, it will generally go in ca. 1/3,
    pushed by hand, fairly snugly.