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Purchased A Dept. Trade In G17

909 Views 8 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  DJ Niner
I'm kind of a noob when it comes to Glocks. I just purchased a used G17 as a birthday gift for my soon-to-be 21-yr-old son. What can I do to make sure it functions as flawlessly as a brand new one? Which springs should I replace, etc.? Any suggestions will be appreciated.
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recoil spring and extractor spring are probably the only ones that may cause issues,, but to be honest if it was police gun it was probably not fired much, maybe 50-100rds a year for qualifying.
And mag springs or new mags. Depending on just how soon he's to be 21 I understand you can send them to Glock for refurb at a reasonable price, but it probably doesn't need it.
 

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Honestly, I would load it and shoot it. If it worked well, I would be done with it.
 
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Honestly, I would load it and shoot it. If it worked well, I would be done with it.
Agree. Best way to figure out functionality is go out and shoot the pistol. It's easy to replace any parts on the Glock pistol if needed. I would be looking for new magazines and ammo to go with the pistol.
 

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Unless it is a fairly recent model, I think a couple of brand-new new-production mags would be the best way to make sure it would run smoothly. You can still keep/use the older mags for range/target/practice shooting, but for serious purposes and functioning peace-of-mind, I'd get a few new mags right off the bat.

A close visual inspection of the recoil spring assembly should show whether it is old/worn (scratches on rod, fouling on spring) or new-looking (relatively clean and scratch-free). It may be either, as sometimes the RSA is replaced as part of a refurb, and sometimes it is not. If it looks old, then a new RSA might be a good investment too, and they're not very expensive at all.

Finally, make sure it is properly lubricated before first use, and buy/use decent ammo for the first outing (no cheap-o steel-case/import crap). Brass-case domestic ammo isn't that much more expensive than the bargain-basement stuff, and after you know the pistol works reliably with good ammo, you (or he) can always try out the cheaper ammo types without wondering if any jamming during testing is a pistol problem, or the crappy ammo.

My first Glock was a G17 police trade-in/refurb, and it gave me a decade of excellent service before I starting adding to the lineup and branching out into other Glock models.


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