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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just adopted a 4 month old beagle, lab mix from a shelter. She's been spayed and is doing well. The main problem is her pulling on the leash when walking. She does well until we get in sight of the house and she knows she's almost home. Then it's an all out tug of war to get home. I've tried making her stop walking and sit, stay for a minute or two but when released she starts all over again. I've also considered the choke or pinch collars but would rather not go this route yet. I praise her and give treats when she walks nice.

Just some info....she is crate trained and housebroken. She is in the crate for 4 hours in the morning and gets let out for potty and short play time then 4 hours in the afternoon. She stays in the crate all night without whining or potty accidents.
 

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How much leash are you giving puppy when you go on walks?

If you haven't done so I'd recommend you take a gander at some episodes of "The Dog Whisperer" (Cesar Millan) which airs on the National Geographic Channel.

Millan's URL:

www.dogpsychologycenter.com

has more resources.

Cesar is da man when it comes to dog behavioral problems (which are also often dog owner behavioral problems)

"I rehabilitate dogs. I train people." :dog: :)
 

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There are two other options that help with pullers. One is a Gentle Leader (also known as a Halti or Head Halter)

http://www.bargraph.com/gentleleader/

and the other I'll have to get the name for. The Gentle Leader is available at most pet supplies like Petsmart. It fits like a normal collar with an extra loop that goes loosley around the muzzle. The website has all the information on the psychology of why they work.

The other is a harness that fits around the neck like a regular collar and then two straps with fleece covers that go down the sides and come up around the armpits and back to an attachment ring where the leash hooks to it. When they pull, the leash pulls the two straps under the front legs and makes pulling uncomfortable. I'll try to find more information on this harness as it was a donation to the rescue group my girlfriend is with. We have a big boxer boy who was bad about pulling until we put this harness on him and he's calmed down a lot.

Both seem to work well although the Gentle Leader doesn't work as well on dogs with short muzzles (i.e. boxers).
 

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Your dog sees your yard as her comfort zone. It's her home and where she sleeps, eats, plays, etc. What you need to do is be her second comfort zone, a home-away-from-home of sorts. When you take her on a walk mix up your routes. Plan out a few routes ahead of time and pick a new one everyday. If you stick to just one or two routes she'll become trained to them and know when she's about to get back home. If you go somewhere different everyday she won't have as clear of an idea of where home is and she'll rely on you to be her home for the walk. Every once-in-a-while walk past your house before you actually go back, maybe even on the other side of the street if possible. That way she, after a while, she won't automatically assume that you're going back home.

Another thing is food and water. It's kept at the house and she probably wants to get a little drink as soon as possible. They make little bowls with bottles attached so you can have a portable water bowl:



They even make a CamelBak for dogs that both you and her can use. I'd think that using something like one of those might help quench her thirst, both for water and for home. You may even want to carry a small treat for her to eat. Stop in the shade for about 5 to 10 minutes and let her eat it and rest. Stop in different places every walk, otherwise she may start to feel that a particular place is also her home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advise. We got along better over the weekend. I took a different route and right when we were about to the house turned and went another lap around the neighborhood. I think it also helped that she was a little more tired this time. We had played fetch in our yard before going on the walk.

Thanks again.
 

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Originally posted by BexarWolf
There are two other options that help with pullers. One is a Gentle Leader (also known as a Halti or Head Halter)

http://www.bargraph.com/gentleleader/

and the other I'll have to get the name for. The Gentle Leader is available at most pet supplies like Petsmart. It fits like a normal collar with an extra loop that goes loosley around the muzzle. The website has all the information on the psychology of why they work.

The other is a harness that fits around the neck like a regular collar and then two straps with fleece covers that go down the sides and come up around the armpits and back to an attachment ring where the leash hooks to it. When they pull, the leash pulls the two straps under the front legs and makes pulling uncomfortable. I'll try to find more information on this harness as it was a donation to the rescue group my girlfriend is with. We have a big boxer boy who was bad about pulling until we put this harness on him and he's calmed down a lot.

Both seem to work well although the Gentle Leader doesn't work as well on dogs with short muzzles (i.e. boxers).
We tried both, the second one worked the best for us. My dog didn't like the loop across her nose at all.
 

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Our boxer is brutal on walks. We don't give him much leash, and we do everything we're supposed to do in order to keep him under control. We've tried using a Halti, but even after a couple months he would still spend more time fighting the Halti than walking. He was kind of like a fish on a hook, jumping and twisting -- it was pretty embarrassing. Chokers don't work, and even my labs claw collar didn't slow him down much. If you guys think of the name of that other under-arm harness, please let me know. I'll pretty much try anything at this point.
 

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Take the dog on a walk, if she pulls on the leash, stand still until she stops (I think the record is like 22 minutes ;) ). When she relaxes/sits, take a step. If she starts pulling again, stand still until she relaxes/sits. Next time take two steps, etc. etc. until she will walk by your side with no tension on the leash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
SKeefe............this is exactly what I've been doing and it has finally started to work. When she starts pulling on the leash I give a quick snap and release of the leash to get her attention then make her sit for awhile to calm down.

Thanks for all the good advise.
 

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What i did was, put on the E-collar with her leather collar and take her favorite toy/treat. I would attach my lead to the leather collar, (i never attach a lead to the e-collar.) Then I would hold that toy or treat by my leg. She naturaly would look at it and then off we went. The min she got ahead or started to snif or walk the other direction i would hit the nick button on my Ecollar. ("low stim" Level 30 on the Dogtra 1700) This nick would break her concentration and focus back on me.

Now i can walk her and she is focused on me 95% of the time. I usualy talk to my dog and praise her as we walk. When she gets to moving a little bit faster i will say "slow it down." This may sounds crazy but it works for us. Dont get discouraged and loose it, Dogs can sense that behavior so be confident and walk with confidence. I also keep my head up and walk with good posture, for some reason it helped.

I dont beleve in putting a choke collar on and yanking on my dogs neck because it could cause damage to there neck and internal tracheal damage. I would try a pinch collar or a Ecollar or even a flat collar before a choke collar.
 

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Originally posted by lepmik
http://www.leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm

Check out Ed's advice on prong collars. They look much more menacing than they are, and it only takes once for the dog to learn not to pull.
This device works great for pullers.

Just a FYI to all those out there that may not be up on all the types of collars. What he stated above is the same thing as a Pinch collar that i mentioned.

I have had great service from Leeburg on all my items and would recomend them. I use my pinch/prong collar every once in a wile. One thing you may take note about the pinch/prong collar is just be careful around the eyes when removing and putting on. I have seen some dogs freak out and jump around that is why i say just take care when putting on and removing.
 

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Originally posted by Justin lewis
...One thing you may take note about the pinch/prong collar is just be careful around the eyes when removing and putting on. I have seen some dogs freak out and jump around...
This is definitely a concern. I flip it inside out when putting it on my dog, rotate it so the fingers are in after I get it on, and then rotate it back out when I take it off. That minimizes the risk of poking the dog in the face. We also have a routine where she knows I won't put the collar on her and take her for a walk until she sits still and lets me suit her up properly.
 

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Originally posted by lepmik
If you unhook the prong collar there should be no chance of it hitting the dog in the eye. Are you sliding it over it's head??
Yes I do slide it over her head. She will hold still for me, so that's not a problem. I've just found that sliding it on and quickly rotating it is quicker than connecting/disconnecting it. The method just plays better to my personal dexterity.
 

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Originally posted by mpol777
I'll second the gentle leader. Worked wonders on our pound puppies. They can easily break an old dog of bad habbits and don't cause any harm.
Except our dog. He has almost dislocated my wife's shoulder pulling her suddenly with that thing on.:upeyes:

We [mainly my wife since I am at work] have been working on that with him for several months now. He is finally showing some more discipline.
 

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Originally posted by PlasticGuy
Yes I do slide it over her head. She will hold still for me, so that's not a problem. I've just found that sliding it on and quickly rotating it is quicker than connecting/disconnecting it. The method just plays better to my personal dexterity.

Gotta jump in here.
PG, if you are sliding it over the dogs head, it has too many links in it. It needs to be tight to be effective if you are going to use one. Guys, if you are correcting your dogs more 3-4 times IN IT'S LIFE for something and the dog still doesnt get it, YOU aren't doing something right. Pullers can usually be fixed in about 10-15 minutes.
Here is my method:
Link

If anybody needs more help, let me know.
:)
 

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Originally posted by G20man32904
PG, if you are sliding it over the dogs head, it has too many links in it. It needs to be tight to be effective if you are going to use one. Guys, if you are correcting your dogs more 3-4 times IN IT'S LIFE for something and the dog still doesnt get it, YOU aren't doing something right. Pullers can usually be fixed in about 10-15 minutes.
That dog has a small head and a large neck. It is adjusted correctly, and that was confirmed by the instructor at the obedience school we attended. Besides, that's not the dog that pulls. That dog is very well behaved on a leash.

It's our other dog (the boxer) that thinks he's a sled dog. He's got a fat mellon and a small neck, and we do have to put the claw collar on the normal way for him. It is better, but not perfect. I'll take a look at your link tomorrow and see if it can help. Thanks for the input.
 
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