.pst problem

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Glocks&Ducs, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. Glocks&Ducs

    Glocks&Ducs

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    Anybody have extensive experience dealing with this? I am running Outlook 2003 and a while back my e-mail wouldn't open without going through the whole "didn't close properly routine" and even after it went through the minutes long check, I couldn't send or receive or download anything in my e-mails, or print them, or from them. Matter of fact, if my computer was hooked up to the internet, it would lock the computer up.

    When I tried checking it out off-line, I always got the cycle redundancy message. I did some research and found that it is a common problem that is normally handled by creating a backup of that .pst file and running the scanpst utility, then creating a new pst file, and importing the repaired data.

    Well, when I tried that, I couldn't create a backup because I would get the cycle redundancy message, so I tried running the tool without creating a backup, and I still got the cycle redundancy message, which caused the tool to fail to fix the problem. It did say to run scandisk and try again, but scandisk says everything is just peachy.

    Basically, I have run into a catch 22. The best I could do is move that file to an embedded folder and create a new file so that I could start getting my e-mails again. I was just using the webmail function up to that time, but it was about to run out of space, so I had to do something.

    Most of the stuff I have in the old file is junk, but I did lose all of my contacts, and there are a few receipts I would like to retrieve for on-line purchases I have made in the past.
     
  2. mr.scott

    mr.scott

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    CRC errors typically indicate the hard drive has a bad sector. Try running check disk with the recover bad sectors option. And wait a long time.

    How big is your pst. If close to or over 2gb you're flirting with disaster.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2012

  3. Glocks&Ducs

    Glocks&Ducs

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    I have done that and it does not indicate that anything is wrong.

    I will add this. One day my computer crashed, and I had to do something to it which involved using the original disk so that it could recover some bad files. I don't remember what that procedure was, I found it on-line, but it did involve going through the command prompt screen, and not something automatic, like just throwing the recovery disk in. After that, is when there seemed to be a disconnect between the computer and Outlook.

    I remember it locked up while trying to download an e-mail from my boss that contained a few PDF and excel files. I don't know if that had anything to do with it or not.

    When it crashed, I thought my hard drive was simply toast because I was getting the black screen with saying something about no boot sector, or something along those lines. It has been a while. This originally happened last August.
     
  4. gemeinschaft

    gemeinschaft AKA Fluffy316

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    Probably the best advice I could give you is backup all of your data now...

    Once you have sucessfully done that, then look at your PST issue.

    I apologize if I am beating a dead horse here, but when you repair a PST file, it needs to be while you do not have the .PST file in use by Outlook. While it is resting, if you will.

    Making a copy of the .PST and calling it MyPST.old is a good way to go.

    Once you run ScanPST, I would highly recommend archiving your mail folder. Basically, this moves old e-mails into another file so that you can still access them, but your .PST file is not "as heavy" as it once was and typically will be smooth runnings from there forward.
    The issues you described having with your computer sound like your Master Boot Record (MBR) either got corrupted or you had a loose cable. If it was MBR corruption and rewriting the MBR with a recovery disk fixed it, then you may be on the road to hard drive failure. Have backups ready to go in the event that you experience this unfortunate event.

    Hard drives die, that's what they do. But your data can live on forever, which means that you can move on forever.
     
  5. Glocks&Ducs

    Glocks&Ducs

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    I did back my data up, and I already attempted what you stated. That is my problem. I can't copy or backup or run the scanpst utility on the pst file, even after I detached it from Outlook. I still get the cyclic redundancy message. It won't let me do anything to it because I get the cyclic redundancy message. The only thing I was able to do was move it. I created a new folder and dragged it in there. That allowed me to continue using Outlook with a new pst folder.

    That is my catch 22 problem.
     
  6. Glocks&Ducs

    Glocks&Ducs

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    The 2GB limit does not apply to Outlook 2003 or later.
     
  7. mr.scott

    mr.scott

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    You can use pst's larger than 2gb, but you are skirting with fire. I fight this fight everyday at work.