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Proper Grip on Glock 34

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Intel486, Jan 26, 2006.

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  1. Intel486

    Intel486

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    I've been trying to find a good grip to use (I'm talking how to put my hands on the gun, not a slip on rubber grip, etc.) on my Glock 34.

    I use to have an XD40 but decided to standardized and bought a Glock 34 to compliment my carry gun, a Glock 26. Problem is the Glock 34's grip seems to be wider compared to the XD. I've put a picture of my 34 at the bottom. I photoshopped a red line in there to show the dimension I'm talking about... also photoshopped some stuff out because I was bored...

    Just seems I can't grip it as well and my hands slip a little with every shot and it's causing me to start to anticipate shots.

    Could anyone provide pictures of the grip that works for them or give me some good instructions. Only gun I can't seem to get a comfortable grip on.

    [​IMG];f
     
  2. cmfranks

    cmfranks

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    I have had this problem w/ all of my glocks except the sub's. What i did was get a grip reduction. This makes the overall width smaller as well as takes out some of the "hump" on the back strap.

    Contact Tom Snell @ Heritage Firearms in Austin, Texas (512-219-1122)

    He has some of the best prices and by far the best work i have seen. And no, I don't work for him. Just a very impressed customer.

    Check out my pics he did of my G35 in the long slide forum.

    Hope this helps
     

  3. Intel486

    Intel486

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    Thanks, I checked it out.

    I like how it doesn't cover the entire grip like some I've seen.

    I'll have to see about doing that in the future but I'd kind of like to be able to figure out a way to do it without changing the gun.
     
  4. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    Glocks have grips like bars of soap. They are all too slick for me, regardless of size or generation.

    I either put the most aggressive grip tape known to man on them, or have them stippled by my gunsmith.

    That solves the "slippage" problem. But movement of the weapon during firing is also a result of recoil, and the most effective way to control recoil is to use the "thumbs forward" grip used by most top shooters today.

    A combination of a good grip surface and proper grip technique will enhance recoil control and reduce slippage.

    Andy C.
     
  5. glooooock

    glooooock Tall Member

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    I have tried many different grip styles, one handed - right - left, so far the best for me "right handed shooter" putting most of your palm on the right side of the grip. with your trigger finger as far through the trigger guard as you can get it.

    Forget the tip of the finger on the trigger & putting the frame in the Vee of your thumb and index fingers. You should have as much skin contacting the right side as possible . The left hand should compress the right hand grip tighter. Keep thinking of contact at the lower third of the grip as well, choking the upper grip will reduce your contact area.

    Try some dry firing at a white wall or bright sky light vary the position till the sights don’t move when you pull the trigger .
    I use the A-grip wrap around for a pad / better contact.

    Get some hot heavy grain practice ammo, let the gun beat you up for 50 rd.Try some lighter loaded ammo / lead reloads / light stuff. You will not flinch as much. No coffee or sugar till your done shooting.
     
  6. Intel486

    Intel486

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    Thanks for the tips so far. Any more would be greatly appreciated though.

    My hands aren't that small so I really wonder what people with smaller hands can do with these guns.

    I looked in Andy Stanford's Surgical Speed book and Mas Ayoob's Combat Handgunnery and read what I could find on proper grip and trigger pull. I changed my grip up ever so slightly and want to try it out at the range sometime this week. Going to do some dry firing beforehand and right now I can get a good clean trigger pull with minimal to no sight movement.

    Anyone have any pics of David Sevigny's grip on his G35 (At least I believe that's what he's shooting)?

    I want to see what I can come up with before I start doing any type of permanent modifications to my frame (i.e. grip reduction). I'll probably try some grip tape before I do a grip reduction as well.

    But in other news I've crossed into 1400 rounds through my G34 and I couldn't be more happy with it so far. Going to pick up a new case of 9mm for it as well. A couple targets from the last range visit. I was shooting CCI Blazer Aluminum. Not the best stuff but it's cheap and burns cleaner than WWB I've found.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. glooooock

    glooooock Tall Member

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    I bet that group would be 30% smaller with high quality reloads. Whats the range on the target you posted " pretty Nice ".

    I know a lot of the .45 -.38 super guys use the grip with both thumbs on the left side pointing toward the target. It doesnt feel as good on a glock ,as a 1911 frame.
     
  8. Intel486

    Intel486

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    Both are at 30ft.

    The top one on the left says Glock 34, 30 ft. It's a camera phone so that's why you can't really read it.

    Getting reloading equipment is on my to do list. I've been holding off a .45acp until I get equipment. I'll probably be moving soon so I was going to wait to get that done before I buy equipment.

    What is some accurate factory loads to shoot that aren't too expensive? Don't really want to go out there with Federal Hydrashocks or similar at $14 for 20... lol
     
  9. glooooock

    glooooock Tall Member

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    I used win. white box / PMC / 9 mm ,black-hills reloads were a bit more but super accurate. I bought some win. FMJ-HP .40 at walmart it was very good for cheap stuff. I would stay away from lighter than 124gr. stuff in 9mm.

    Do your research and buy large in the reloading gear, as it will be busy once setup.
     
  10. margo

    margo

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    I am just a medum sized girl with medum sized hands but shooting my G21 doesn't seem incomfortable. I see people complain about the large glock grips and I wonder if I am gripping mine properly. Maybe I don't have a lot of experiance with a variety of guns and don't know what a proper grip is. I've had a few revolvers but other than my glocks my semis are small cheap .25's that are actually painful to shoot because the moving parts get in the way of the grip. I wouldn't mind the G21 to be a little thinner but I do as well as the people I regularly shoot with. I actaully like the glock hump, it fills up my palm. My g26 feels like it has been poured into my hand, esp with the pinkie extention.

    Someone should start a pic thread of peoples grips. Maybe I will start one, I would like to get opinions and suggestions of gripping my glock.


    Oh, there is something called "tommy tape" which is a self adhering silicon stretchy tape you could try. Or, tape for bicycles might work well also. There is this one kind that also has cushion in it, the bike shop I go to says golfers have been putting it on their clubs.
     
  11. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    I'll post some pics later this morning when my photographer gets out of bed. Proper grip technique is so important, and it is one of those things that takes some time and effort to master.

    Andy C.
     
  12. Intel486

    Intel486

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    I love the way my Glock 26 fits in my hand. It's just I can't seem to find the best way to get a handle on the 34. Want to get it under control because I was thinking of a 35 also in the future. I really like this sized Glock.

    If you make that thread, please post a link.

    Thanks, that would be really helpful. I might take some pics of mine to see what people suggest. I probably should have done that from the start.
     
  13. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    OK, here are a couple of pics of my grip. The first pic is of my left side, showing the position of my wrist and thumbs. Unfortunately I have thick wrists and seriously "hitch-hiker" thumbs, which don't point forward like people with straight thumbs would.
     
  14. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    If you look at that picture, you can see that my left wrist is cocked down. I can't tilt it down any further, even if I wanted to. I keep that wrist cocked down while firing. The recoil of the pistol has to work against that cocked wrist if the muzzle is to rise.

    Here is another pic: If you look at my left pinkie, it is pressing against the bottom of the pistol grip, just above the magwell. This provides leverage against muzzle rise.
     
  15. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    Here is a pic showing how my hands come together on the grip. When firing, my left hand provides about 60% of the grip force on the weapon, and my right hand about 40%. That's right; my "weak" or support hand is what is doing most of the gripping.
     
  16. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    Here is a pic from the rear. To best control the pistol, you want as much palm flesh, especially from your support hand, against the upper rear portion of the grip and frame. You also want as little space between your palms as possible.
     
  17. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    Here is a pic showing how I apply grip tape to my 24. Most of my other pistols have similar applications. The grip tape provides friction between the skin of your palm and the grip of the weapon, further preventing muzzle rise in recoil.
     
  18. Tc300mag1

    Tc300mag1

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    Those are some good pics pretty much they way i shoot..

    Ive let a few people shoot my 10mm but most complain about the grip ..

    Also if your hands are slipping i suggest grip tape or agrip
     
  19. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    it is difficult to learn how to properly grip a pistol by looking at photos. while that can be helpful with getting positioning right, the pictures do nothing to explain the dynamics of the grip.

    The entire purpose of the grip that I use (and many other shooters) is to help control the recoil of the pistol, and to help relax your shooting hands so that you can use your trigger finger to best effect.

    Cocking your support wrist down creates resistance to the upward movement of the weapon in recoil. Pressure created by cocking your wrist where your support hand pinkie contacts the bottom front of the grip also creates resistance to the movement of the pistol. Finally, the amount of skin in contact with the grip and upper frame of the pistol, and the friction created there, also helps control recoil.

    Recoil cannot be done away with; the pistol WILL move when firing. The idea is merely to dampen the movement so that the shooter can get the sights back on target more rapidly, and so the strong hand can move the trigger as rapidly as the shooter needs to.

    If you are using proper technique, someone can bump the bottom of the slide or barrel of your pistol out near the muzzle, and they will feel quite a lot of resistence.

    Also very important is the stance of the shooter. Without proper stance, the shooter cannot take best advantage of the grip, and recoil swill not be controlled as well.

    When using this grip, the shooter should have most of his/her weight on the balls of your feet, not on the heels. Your knees should be comfortably bent, you should be slightly bent at the waist.

    For best effect, your body should be more or less oriented directly at the target, but a little adjustment for your natural point of aim is just fine. You may find that your weak side naturally leads slightly, and that is just fine. Your feet should be placed far apart enough that your feel comfortable and stable. You should be able to resist a firm shove against your chest without having to shift them.

    If you are using proper stance, holding the pistol in the grip I have explained, another person should be able to bump the muzzle of your pistol straight back, and you won't rock back on your heels. Make sure your pistol is unloaded, of course!

    A good shooting stance is very much like a good, mobile fighting stance. Not too low, not too high, stable, comfortable, flexible. Your shoulders should be relaxed, your elbows slightly bent, your head up, not pulled down into your shoulders.

    Hope this helps.

    Andy C.
     
  20. Andrew Colglazier

    Andrew Colglazier 3036 Promoter

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    As have many handgun shooters, I've gone through several iterations when it comes to stance and grip technique. I began just holding the gun and trying to be steady with one hand, such as bullseye shooters use. From there I moved to the "saucer and teacup" method. Then to the Weaver stance. And now I utilize the isosceles stance.

    I use the isosceles stance now because it works best with the "high thumbs" or "thumbs forward" grip. This grip technique, which most highly-skilled modern hand gunners use, is as follows:

    For safety's sake, triple-check to make sure your weapon is empty.

    1. Grip the handgun in your strong hand as usual.

    2. While pointing your weapon at your target, point your weak hand thumb at the target. Yes, I said, point it at the target! Lay it alongside the frame of the weapon so it is parallel and touching, overlap your weak hand's fingers over the strong hand's fingers.

    3. Both thumbs should be more or less parallel to the slide of the weapon. Your strong hand thumb should be relaxed and basically doing nothing (or resting on the thumb safety - depending on the gun). Your weak hand should be applying pressure to the fingers of the strong hand, basically holding the strong hand in its grip on the weapon.

    4. Lean forward slightly at the waist.

    5. Grip the handgun so that about 60% of your grip comes from the weak hand, 40% from the strong hand.

    6. Your weak hand wrist should be locked, pointing your thumb at the target, so your arm makes a straight line from the tip of your thumb to your shoulder.

    7. The palm and heel of your weak hand should have maximum contact with the grip of the weapon. The grip of the weapon should be held between the heel of your strong hand and the heel of your weak hand.

    OK. If you are doing this correctly, you have just maximized the amount of hand flesh contacting your weapon.

    9. Extend both arms equally out from the body to eye level with your torso square to your target. Your feet should be about shoulder width apart, with your weight on the balls of your feet, not your heels. Bend both elbows so that they are comfortable. Do not lock them. Your weak arm elbow will be slightly straighter than your strong arm.

    Four things will help to control recoil and maximize accuracy. Your locked weak wrist; the pressure applied to the weapon by your weak thumb; the heel of your weak hand against the grip/frame of the weapon. All of these things help to dampen recoil. The 60-40 grip helps to allow your strong hand to relax, and this allows your trigger finger to run the trigger without causing your whole hand to grip the weapon too strongly. The 60-40 grip enhances accuracy.

    This grip can be used on just about any handgun, including revolvers.

    This grip can be enhanced by applying skateboard tape to the grips of the weapon, and to the point on the weapon (the frame) where your weak hand contacts the weapon. I have this on all of my Glocks, and the rougher surface definitely aids in controlling recoil. And yes, I have it on my carry weapons also.

    Without this technique you simply cannot control recoil effectively. With proper technique, it appears that the slide simply cycles back and forward, back and forward, with practically no muzzle rise. Imagine what this can do for your accuracy and speed? You don't lose your sights, your shot splits decrease, your accuracy improves. All plusses in my book.

    Andy C.