Project help -- questions about lightweight metal tubes (Ti?)

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by DJ Niner, Jun 29, 2020.

  1. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    I was aware of the second aspect (can be a plus for survival situations).
    I was NOT aware of that first problem.

    I'll strike Mg off my list. Thanks!
    .
     
  2. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks for EVERYTHING that you covered, it was ALL appreciated! One question; you said:

    Can I assume you're arriving at this by using the formula to find the material volume of a cylinder's walls, then multiplying it by the material density? If not, how are you getting this figure? I was hoping to find sellers that listed a weight-per-foot or per-piece for their metal tubes, but no such luck, so far.
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    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
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  3. RenoF250

    RenoF250

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    That is why I would put it in Ti but that would be expensive. The cheaper version and the CF still looks cool is cover it in clear bra for the front of the car. That stuff can take a beating and will hold in any fibers.
     
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  4. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks for the feedback! You're probably right, at least about the first one. I can give-up the club use, but I really want it to be able to bridge across a hole in the river ice and take my weight if I break through, so I have time to deploy my ice pick(s) without being pulled under the ice and downstream away from the hole.

    That's actually what I've been using up to this point. But most of the telescoping models are friction-lock, so you can't even lean on them hard or they telescope-collapse, and the tubing itself is very thin (I've bent/broken two of them already; one during a fall, and the other I got one end jammed between twin tree trunks as I walked by and folded it in half). The lack of durability of the telescoping models is one of the factors that is driving this project.
    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
  5. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    Daaaang. That is the full-on McGuyver Model!

    Truth be told, I already carry most of that stuff elsewhere on my body or in my woods-wandering camera case already.

    If I ever build a takedown staff, I'll use that link you posted for the joint sections -- thanks!
    .
     
  6. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    I've not heard of them before, but I will definitely look them up.
    Even if they don't have what I want, they might provide some inspiration.
    Thanks!
    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
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  7. Haldor

    Haldor Formerly retired EE.

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    If there is ever the possibility you might want to use this in town as well, may I suggest an unbreakable umbrella?

    I have one with the straight handle and they are not kidding about how robust these are. The conventional bent handle version would tick off a bunch of your boxes. A bit short for a camera monopod.

    https://unbreakableumbrella.com/unbreakable-walking-stick-umbrella-standard/

    Extra benefits are that you can carry it anywhere (TSA security), it will keep the rain off and nobody will think you are odd when they see you walking around with it.
     
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  8. Rotn1

    Rotn1

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    I spent a career in the metals industry (Steel) so I used to be able to calculate this stuff in my head. As a rough calculation only to calculate the theoretical weight of a length of steel tubing the formula is:

    (Outside Diameter - Wall thickness) X Wall Thickness X 10.68

    To get you very close to a theoretical weight for aluminum tube use 3.7 (instead of 10.68)

    For your interest the weight of a cubic inch of steel weighs 0.2836 lbs and the weight of a cubic inch of aluminum weighs 0.0979 lbs. Slight deviations in the production tolerances mean you shouldn't agonize over the third significant decimal place.

    If you want an easy on-line weight calculator I found a good one at TWMetals.com just select / plug in the specifications and dimensional choices and you will get the weight so close it won't matter for your project.

    The $47 price for the 6 foot length I mentioned earlier came from OnLineMetals.com but I imagine there are many other on-line sources. Internet Metal Sellers make a huge mark up on small quantity /online sales. UPS deliver makes them able to ship just about anywhere quickly.

    If you had a local tubing distributor in your area you may be able to walk in on look through their off cuts or scrap bucket...... but that's probably more trouble than its worth.

    Just for giggles; aluminum tubing at the mill / wholesale level for a production run is certainly no more than $6,000 per ton ($3.00 per lb). The $47 price for the 72” length of 6061 weighing 2.42 Lbs is equivalent to over $38,000 per ton / $19 per Lb. the price is all distribution, quantity and minimum order mark up related.

    Good luck
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
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  9. Joshhtn

    Joshhtn The eBay Guy Gold Member

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    This thread has peaked my interest.

    Tagged...
     
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  10. DoubleWide

    DoubleWide

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    What's the collapsed size you need if you were doing a 72" pole?
     
  11. flyover

    flyover

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  12. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    I'm not doing one of those at this time, just a standard straight walking stick around 66"-72".

    However, several folks I know who travel for bird watching have telescoping trekking poles that are small enough to fit in a small suitcase/duffel bag. If I was going to do a take-down staff, I'd probably use the same max length those use, whatever it is (I'd have to research it). It would probably end up being a 3- or 4-piece staff. If you used the max inside diagonal measurement of a larger personal suitcase, you might even get away with making it a 2-piece unit. Mine would probably be a 4-piece, because I like a high top when it's fully vertical, for steadying binoculars when looking nearly straight up into the treetops.
     
  13. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    An absolute TON of good info; I'll never be able to communicate how useful this is to the project!
    THANK YOU!

    Hmmm. Sounds like there might be some money to be made here!
    Where could I stash a ton of 6-foot Aluminum tubes around the house...
    :supergrin:
    .
     
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  14. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    Got one of those on the way, just to examine it and maybe steal the I-beam fiberglass shaft out of it (it was REALLY cheap). The Amazon page I ordered it from (not your link) SAYS it's a Nupla-brand pole, but based on the other prices I've seen, it's probably a knockoff.
     
  15. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    The Nupla pike arrived today in excellent shape. It has absolutely no written, stamped or cast markings on the item itself, just a few stickers with stock numbers, etc. The handle is more rigid in the vertical position (with the "I" in the I-beam cross-section vertical) than it is rotated 90 degrees left or right, but seems like it might still be strong enough for my uses even in those orientations. If I cut the toolhead off as close as possible to its base, I will be left with about 65" of usable handle, with a good pliable slightly-rounded silicone-type cap plug on one end.

    The first problem I discovered is the size of the rounded "I" cross-section; it's around 1.375 inches "tall" by 0.970 wide. That makes it very challenging to find any kind of a cap or rubber foot to cover the end. Most hiking staff cap/foot sizes stop at one inch, or 1.25" max. I found some chair-leg caps that might work, and they will be here next week. I'll probably have to epoxy or silicone glue it in place, but it might also need some mechanical help like screws inserted through the I-beam webs to give the glue something the grip. The shape is going to allow a lot of flexing of the rubber foot cap, so keeping it in place under hard use might be challenging (click images to embiggen).

    Pike01.jpg

    Pike02.jpg

    Pike03.jpg

    To be continued...

    .
     
  16. Current Resident

    Current Resident

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    When I was younger I worked in a plastic shop that made alot of fiberglass products.

    One thing we made in multiple sizes was fiberglass tubes. Very simple to do with many different styles including Carbon Fibre.
     
  17. Current Resident

    Current Resident

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  18. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    Staff Member

    Starting a thread about a staff......
     
  19. Rotn1

    Rotn1

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    Still better than an average member starting a thread about his.........average member.
     
  20. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Staff Member Moderator

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    And I have to re-write every post several times with a Thesaurus in front of me, because I know what'll happen if I ask you goobers questions about "How rigid should my shaft be?"...