close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Professional welders I need help

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by farmer-dave, May 27, 2012.

  1. farmer-dave

    farmer-dave

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    central Kansas
    I've got a jd combine header auger that cracked out on me. A brief explanation if your not familiar it's like a 30' long tube, maybe 14" diameter with flighting on the outside. Draws grain and straw to center of combine.

    It's really thin metal maybe 16 gauge. It originally started cracking out near a access panel. I've got a flux cored mig, every time I weld the crack it just cracks out again or cracks out next to the weld. The metal is very brittle, tried to straighten a bend near another access panel and one hit with a hammer and it cracked out.

    Got any tips for welding it, is it air cooling too fast making the weld brittle. I could weld a reinforcement plate on it but I'm worried that my welds would just crack out around the plate. I could use some tips. Trying to get by through harvest a replacement would run about 4-6 grand and take a long time to swap out.
     
  2. Resqu2

    Resqu2

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2007
    Messages:
    6,853
    Likes Received:
    1,383
    Location:
    SouthWest VA
    may try to braze it, lower heat may help your situation.
     

  3. Folsom_Prison

    Folsom_Prison Brew Crew

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Messages:
    27,635
    Likes Received:
    4,874
    Location:
    Midwest
    Can you hook a bottle up to your welder? I was never a fan of the flux core so I hooked up a bottle of argon to my Lincoln. Maybe it's me but seems like it get much stronger welds burning the argon compared to the flux core wire.

    <-------- not a pro btw,
     
  4. OGW

    OGW NRA, SAF

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    4,315
    Location:
    N.W. Lower Michigan
    Pardon my ignorance of farm equipment, but is the auger carbon steel or stainless?

    The first things that come to my mind are to make sure the filler metal you're using is compatible with the base and that, depending on the base metal, you may want to preheat and post heat your weld area.
     
  5. OGW

    OGW NRA, SAF

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    4,315
    Location:
    N.W. Lower Michigan
    I don't have nearly as much experience with MIG as with stick, but I, too, prefer gas to flux cored wire.
     
  6. OdinIII

    OdinIII

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2001
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA
    Is it just a straight section of 14" tube that is damaged? If so then could you just wrap it with sheet metal and secure with banding like large radiator clamps? That may work temporarily?
     
  7. janice6

    janice6 Silver Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Messages:
    37,085
    Likes Received:
    27,337
    Location:
    minnesota
    I might also drill a small hole at the ends of the crack to stop it from propagating, then Weld it up..

    Flux core is too hot for thin sheet metal. It's not that you can't do it, just that it takes skill. I would first try brazing as mentioned above. The gas torch may anneal the metal near the weld too. Obviously steel welding with torch is reasonable too.

    I have Mig and Tig, (gave my Oxy Acet to my son). In this case I'd go Tig, If not available, I'd go gas.

    Gas is more forgiving with limited experience on thin sheet steel.

    GL
     
  8. farmer-dave

    farmer-dave

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    central Kansas
    Auger is carbon steel. I'll look to see if gas kits are available for my mig. I agree that flux core sucks when it comes to thin metal. Can't wrap completely with metal and clamp, has auger flighting, and fingers that come out of auger to grab the straw. Thanks everyone for your advice.

    Thought about ordering a better mig before harvest, too bad I didn't get it done. Been eyeing a miller 252.
     
  9. Folsom_Prison

    Folsom_Prison Brew Crew

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Messages:
    27,635
    Likes Received:
    4,874
    Location:
    Midwest
    What welder do you have now?
     
  10. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    36,098
    Likes Received:
    36,149
    Location:
    PA to LA to NY to FL to IL to VA to GA to OH to FL
    I can weld anything from a broken heart to the break of dawn.....:supergrin: with that being said, maybe an apoxy type of patch such as JB Weld to get you through the season.

    It sounds like the metal is gone and needs a skin on it unless a replacement trough is cheaper.

    They make those thin for a reason; replacement parts or replacement all together.

    Just make sure not to "fix your trough" and have that cause the auger, bearings, and drive fail.:wavey:
     
  11. farmer-dave

    farmer-dave

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    central Kansas
    I'm running a lincoln 155 mig, don't have the gas conversion but it looks like I might be able to still get one. I could try brazing the crack but if I braze it and it recracks would I have to grind all the brazing off before attempting to reweld with gas or would the brazing just melt away from the heat of welding?
     
  12. ZekerMan

    ZekerMan ZekerMan

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,487
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Kansas
    Dave: I repaired an unloading auger on a old JD 95 by just leaving the crack alone and forming a piece of sheetmetal over it so it extended 2-4 inches beyond the crack then MIG welded around the whole area, spot welded here and there to keep warpage to a minimum. I did use 75/25 gas. I pulse welded to complete the welds around the spot welds, that was 15 yrs. ago and the present owner is still running the auger as was/is. Good luck and good wheat cutting to you!!!
     
  13. farmer-dave

    farmer-dave

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,213
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    central Kansas
    Thanks for the harvest wishes, too damn early this year. We haven't had rain in 2 months so it will be interesting to see how everything yields, had alot of double crop fields turn white from lack of water.
     
  14. RenoF250

    RenoF250

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    8,170
    Likes Received:
    2,125
    Some pics of your welds would help us to see if it something you are doing. The 252 is quite a jump from the 155. I just picked up a Miller 211 and it is the cat's meow. Works on 120 or 240 and welds up to 3/8" also fairly portable. I would weld the crack with MIG and then grind it flat and weld a patch about 1/2" bigger on all sides on top.

    16 gauge is easy with a good MIG. From the little I have used it flux core sucks.
     
  15. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 1999
    Messages:
    11,314
    Likes Received:
    2,417
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I have found that if I can't fix it/ don't feel I can do a good job I take it in to local shop.

    This guy welds every day/ everything from hand tools to huge equipment. He can weld dang near anything that has a metal in it. You don't get that kind of skill welding every now and again.
    He has stick, ox/acetaline (sp) as well as wire feed/gas shielded.
     
  16. Inyo Tim

    Inyo Tim Senior Moment

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    768
    Location:
    Eastern Sierra Nevada, Calif.
    Maybe not. Sometimes in high abrasion and impact service, manganese steel is used. I've seen it in duct work in pulp mills. The fact that it is cracking next to the weld is a clue. A bit of pre-heat with a torch might keep it from cooling too quick. The suggestion of mig welding in stead of flux core is good too. If you can access both sides of the weld, put a weld on both sides.
    40 years a boilermaker, but getting a little goofy with age.
     
  17. silentpoet

    silentpoet

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Messages:
    29,047
    Likes Received:
    16,301
    Location:
    This Old Caddy
    Flux is probably burning too hot. Maybe a bunch of little tack welds would work. But I think mig is probably your best bet.
     
  18. LippCJ7

    LippCJ7

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,168
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Colorado
    ok this may be more fix then what your interested in but I think I would sleeve it from the inside, but someone did say that the base metal may just be done, 16 gauge is pretty thin but still weldable, no doubt using gas over flux would be better, we sleeve roll cages all the time in order to remove bends and creases in cages (Super Late Model asphalt car) but its not exactly apples to apples, roll cages are much thicker so I'm not sure it would work for you, in any event here is how we do it,

    sleeves extend 3" to either side of the removed section, we drill 2 or 3, 1/2" holes in the base metal to expose the inner portions of the sleeve, seams are beveled and leave a 1/8"-3/16" gap to allow welding the seam as well as the sleeve, then weld the sleeves through the holes to the base and weld the seam, grind the welds flush and paint. when done properly you never see the new section.

    The big difference is the size, your talking a huge tube and were talking less then 3" DOM tube. Like I said its not apples to apples but it may work and should be nearly as strong as new.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2012
  19. Bruce H

    Bruce H

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2000
    Messages:
    4,104
    Likes Received:
    844
    Location:
    missouri
    Mine did the same thing only started at a finger hole. Stick welded and put one inch by eighth inch strips across the weld for reinforcing. Been running two years without problems now.

    Probably break clean off when I cut wheat in ten days to two weeks. :rofl:
     
  20. oceanwarrior

    oceanwarrior

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Messages:
    793
    Likes Received:
    145
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Could be made of HSLA steel(High strength low alloy).
    Try using a 3/32 E7018 stick rod on DCRP to weld it.

    HSLA is subject to Hydrogen enbrittlement and needs a low hydrogen rod to prevent cracking.


    oceanwarrior