Problem with reloads

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by saddleman, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. saddleman

    saddleman

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    I have shot a couple of hundred rounds and Melissa and I are both shooting better with my reloads than with factory loads. First problem was 3 rounds that did not fire. I bulled the bullet and there was powder in it. Bad primer??
    Then, yesterday one fired but the bullet got stuck in the barrel. They are 3.2 clays with 180 frontier bullet in a Glock 23. Recommended load is 3.0 to 3.6 seated at 1.125. I did as suggested, checked my powder weight a couple of times then loaded a few and checked it again, loaded 50 and checked it again.
    Also, the bullets I bought say 40 s&w/10mm. Gander Mnt. is out of 40 but has 10mm. Both are .400. The same?? And if so, why sometimes 40, sometimes 10, sometimes 40/10?
    Thanks
    again
    Rick
     
  2. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    You had a squib. Thats a result of not doing things right on the press not ussually a flaw of the press. What press are you using? What powder measure are you using?
     

  3. ManNamedJed

    ManNamedJed

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    The ones that didn't fire were likely due to high primers. Common mistake with new reloaders. You should inspect all primers after loading.

    .40 and 10mm are the same diameter. Its listed differently by different vendors. 10mm will work fine if its a weight you can load - 200gr is hard to load well with some powders.
     
  4. dudel

    dudel

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    My bet would be with Jed. High primer. I suspect it would have fired on the second try. First strike seated the primer the rest of the way in the pocket, second would have ignited the primer.

    You can verify this by firing the empty case. If the primer goes off, it was high.

    Regarding the squib load, there could be several reasons, usually coming back to not enough powder charge. Single stage or progressive press? What kind of powder measure? Did anything interrupt your routine? I've not used Clays; but some powders meter better than others in different dumps. 3.2 is not a heavy load, and 3.0 - 3.6 is not a lot of leeway for powder variance. The dump needs to be very consistent with that powder type, or else you need to be checking more frequently or go to a powder that gives you more leeway in powder variations.
     
  5. saddleman

    saddleman

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    I am using a dillon square deal and a dillon scale.
     
  6. mteagle1

    mteagle1

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    With automatic indexing I would say it was a double clutch, you pulled the handle down part way and got interupted and let the handle back up and it indexed. I use a 550 but if anything interupts my routine I leave the handle down.
     
  7. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Squibs are almost always short or no powder charges. What was the recoil like? Another reason to not shoot very light loads. If you can NOT determine that it has fired from the recoil/blast, then your loads are too low, bump them up. If you do not push the arm down all the way, it is possible to short stroke the powder measure & get a reduced or no charge. Verifying the powder charge BEFORE placing the bullet is the only sure way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2010
  8. saddleman

    saddleman

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    I had some primers that did not seat well early on but they where obvious. These may not have been seated well but it was not obvious. Can I run them through again or will they expload when the machine tries to push the live primer out?
     
  9. Smoker

    Smoker

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    I've never set off a bum primer punching it out.
     
  10. OLEDAVE

    OLEDAVE What you said?

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    I had a few misfires and light primer strikes when I first started using Wolf primers. Mine were seated properly. What brand primers are you using? Some primers are harder than others. I installed a heavier striker spring and haven't had a problem since. As for the squib, I agree with the light powder drop.
     
  11. Hydraulicman

    Hydraulicman

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    make sure your powder bar is sliding all the way when you work the press.
     
  12. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

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    Since you're new to loading and have run into your first problem it may be time that you start learning some loading vernacular.

    You have already experienced a 'squib'. This is not to be confused with a 'squab'. A 'squib' will most assuredly result in a lost 'squab' whereas a 'squab' will most assuredly result in a higher cholesterol level and a possible bloated feeling.

    Tune in next time when we'll discuss the difference between 'rate of twist' and the dance craze of the '60's. :whistling:


    Jack
     
  13. saddleman

    saddleman

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    The primers that failed where magtech. I just bought some winchester but haven't used any yet..
     
  14. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Rather then blame the machine (not that you are) it more then likely was a result of you pulling a case to check something (powder charge, whatever) and then not putting the charge back in afterwards. OR You had a jam of some sort and didn't get the cases in the right place before restarting. It's suprisingly simple to do this stuff wrong on a progressive. Lets pretend (although it's very, very unlikely) that the machine failed to drop powder. Your still the guy who put a bullet on top of the thing and pulled the handle again. So in the end it's all on you. Just like gun safety you can't push this stuff off on anyone thing else. I have had numerous squibs. All on a auto-indexing press but all as a relatively new reloader. Never had one on my 550. For a newbie you just have to be very carefull. Like I said in another thread. Best thing you can do with a progressive is not interupt your routine. Don't weight the charge all the time. You don't need to. Get the powder settled in the powder measure, use a powder that works OK in your measure and just run 100rds. When the buzzer goes off, leave the handle in the down position. Pull the case that has powder in it out, check the load. Expect it to me a little over weight because of the stuff the sizing die knocked loose when you sized the case. Grab a bullet off the top of your pile, check OAL. But those back, be sure you have powder in the case, put a bullet on top, load the primer tube, raise the handle to seat a primer and keep loading your next 100. If you have your witts about you, you can pull the case before you drop powder and tap it upside own your table to get the crap out. Then it will weight accuarately. Sometime when the buzzer goes off, I stop after sizing/priming the case, pull the case, tap it upsidedown, put it back in, pull the handle and seat bullets till that case has a charge but no powder and then check my powder. This seems complicated but it's not in practice. I just don't want you to freak when you weight a charge and see it's over by .1-.2 grs. It's not the powder, its carbon/crap from inside the case that causes it to vary.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2010
  15. Bullfighter

    Bullfighter

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    I am not saying it is a problem with the powder, but I have only had squibs with Clays. Could be coincidence, but that's my finding. The two I've had have been with small loads such as yours. I can only conclude that it doesn't measure well with my setup (lee autodisk) at low volumes.
     
  16. dudel

    dudel

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    Gone through a 1000 magtechs. Not a bad one in the lot. Better than Wolf. Based on mine, comparable to CCI. I'd not hestitate to get them again.
     
  17. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    +1 I've gone through more MagTechs and they all went bang.

    As Colorado said, you need to look at your processes and not the equipment or components. 3 rounds with no bang...likely cause is that you have high primers (meaning they were not properly seated in the case all the way). Bullet in the barrel is squib round. I'll defer to those that are more familiar with your equipment for advise.

    However I will offer this advice. First, always check for powder in the case. I use a flex light set up so that it shines down the case at the seating stage (after the charge before the bullet is placed and seated). I check every case. It slows me down, but I have never had a squib.

    Next, if you don't have them, I recommend getting those plastic cases. I place every round in the case with the bullet pointed to the bottom. This allows me to inspect for some obvious defects. You see an upside down primer. I hold the case up to eye level and check the height of the rounds to see if there is any rounds that are either significantly longer or shorter than the other rounds. I also check for high primers. These inspections are not a substitute for measuring OAL with calipers periodically, etc. The inspections are meant to give better quality control over your processes.
     
  18. JMiller

    JMiller

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    Isn't there a couple of different types of Clays powders?
     
  19. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

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    Clays, Universal Clays and International Clays. Don't mix them up... they're not interchangeable.

    Clays is a great 12 gauge powder and a very versatile pistol powder.

    Universal Clays is also a very good pistol powder for certain applications.

    International Clays is a fantastic 20 gauge powder... I've never found an application for it in pistol loading. I wish I could... I till have almost 20 pounds of it left.

    Jack
     
  20. JMiller

    JMiller

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    Thats what I was thinking maybe he loaded one type of Clays when he should have used the other?