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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Congrats and welcome to GlockTalk and Glock ownership! They are generally easy to completely strip and reassemble (if nothing is broken) -- and you pay careful attention! Yours was a nice and easy fix quick fix....but it does continue the threads of the week -- to please pay careful attention when putting your Glock back together.
Don't feel bad, here was one of the more interesting posts of someone recently not paying careful attention when putting their Glock back together:

https://www.glocktalk.com/threads/need-help.1687920/

Live and learn!
Oh my freaking gosh... suddenly I don't feel so bad...
 

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Is that what the thing the trigger spring hooks onto is called? The tang? Not knowing what it was called made me avoid trying to call it by name in my original post. You know, to avoid looking dumb and stuff...LOL
Like you, I don't know if there is a specific name for that projection... so I just used a general name. The whole part is called "Trigger with trigger bar". Most Glock parts have specific names per Glock... Slide stop lever (not "slide release"), Slide lock (not "take-down tab"), Firing pin (instead of "striker"), etc.
 

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You all might yell at me; I'm ready to take my lumps. I've field stripped my G19Gen4 many times, but I've never detail stripped it until now ...

... The trigger does not reset until I pull the slide back and release it again! The trigger will consistently reset ONLY after two slide cycles in a row.
SHOULD I TAKE IT TO A GUNSMITH? Or is there an easy fix??
A Glock Armorer will do. But no reason for most people to do a 'detail strip' and apparently it is not an easy fix for most people.
 

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The Three Frame Assembly Errors of Death (Pre-Gen5)
--- OR ---
The One Frame Assembly Error of Death (Gen5)

I always check for three specific reassembly errors on any Glock I get to inspect, to ensure that:

1. Coil Trigger Spring hook has NOT slipped to the side of the Trigger Bar attachment point. The hook must lie in the groove dead center at the TB hook attachment point. It will NOT slip to the side of the trigger bar AFTER the pistol has been properly assembled. However, during assembly it is very easy for the hook to slip to the side of the trigger bar tang and then rub between the trigger bar tang and the inside of the trigger mechanism housing. Problem that an assembly error causes: Intermittant trigger reset failure.

2. Slide Lock properly installed with the groove at the top facing to the rear where it will engage a similar groove on the front of the barrel lug when the pistol has been fully assembled. Problem that an assembly error causes: Slide Lock groove fails to engage slide assembly's barrel lug groove, which will soon allow the slide assembly to propel itself forward and off the frame. Hard floor impact may then seriously damage the slide's RSA boss and slide grooves. Also, the slide assembly will not be in full battery even though the action appears fully closed. This results in abnormal shot dispersal on target.

3. Slide Stop Lever and Spring - The wire spring end must run UNDER the Locking Block Pin. Problem that an assembly error causes: The reduced wire spring tension allows the Slide Stop Lever to flip up during recoil and stop slide forward motion into battery, even though the magazine is NOT empty.

NOTES:
-> Condition #1 occurs mainly to Gen3 pistols made since 2011, and to Gen4 pistols, all of which have improved trigger spring attachment points to reduce the likelihood of trigger spring hook failure. Condition #1 does NOT apply to Gen5/M/G42/G43 pistols.
-> Condition #3 does NOT apply to Gen5/M/G42/G43 pistols.

The three conditions I list above represent common but very serious assembly errors made by improperly-trained "armorers". All three may exist simultaneously, yet the pistol will appear to be fully functional to the neophyte armorer.

It does not help that every knucklehead as soon as he stops crapping yellow runs out and makes a "helpful" Glock U-toob video the day after he buys his first Glock, failing to make note of the potential for these very serious "occult" errors that won't be self-revealing in superficial post-assembly pistol function checks.

It takes only 30 seconds to check for all of these, if one is slow.

If I get to disassemble the slide, I check for proper firing pin spring cup installation, and for free motion of the firing pin and its engagement with the firing pin safety.

BONUS NOTES: :)
-> Ignore any posting in which the Slide Lock is called the "take down lever".
-> Ignore any posting in which the Slide Stop Lever is called the "slide lock".
 

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For future reference while I would agree a detail strip of the slide is not unreasonable at about every 5000 rounds ( replace rsa and strip and clean slide at the same time) detail stripping the frame is totally unnecessary unless you break something. What ever you can get to in the field stripped condition for cleaning is more than adequate for routine maintenance. A Glock ( or any firearm in reality) does NOT have to be white glove inspection clean to be functional. And if you have a guy that will only work when you expend tremendous effort to keep it spotless, there is something wrong with it
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The Three Frame Assembly Errors of Death (Pre-Gen5)
--- OR ---
The One Frame Assembly Error of Death (Gen5)

I always check for three specific reassembly errors on any Glock I get to inspect, to ensure that:

1. Coil Trigger Spring hook has NOT slipped to the side of the Trigger Bar attachment point. The hook must lie in the groove dead center at the TB hook attachment point. It will NOT slip to the side of the trigger bar AFTER the pistol has been properly assembled. However, during assembly it is very easy for the hook to slip to the side of the trigger bar tang and then rub between the trigger bar tang and the inside of the trigger mechanism housing. Problem that an assembly error causes: Intermittant trigger reset failure.

2. Slide Lock properly installed with the groove at the top facing to the rear where it will engage a similar groove on the front of the barrel lug when the pistol has been fully assembled. Problem that an assembly error causes: Slide Lock groove fails to engage slide assembly's barrel lug groove, which will soon allow the slide assembly to propel itself forward and off the frame. Hard floor impact may then seriously damage the slide's RSA boss and slide grooves. Also, the slide assembly will not be in full battery even though the action appears fully closed. This results in abnormal shot dispersal on target.

3. Slide Stop Lever and Spring - The wire spring end must run UNDER the Locking Block Pin. Problem that an assembly error causes: The reduced wire spring tension allows the Slide Stop Lever to flip up during recoil and stop slide forward motion into battery, even though the magazine is NOT empty.

NOTES:
-> Condition #1 occurs mainly to Gen3 pistols made since 2011, and to Gen4 pistols, all of which have improved trigger spring attachment points to reduce the likelihood of trigger spring hook failure. Condition #1 does NOT apply to Gen5/M/G42/G43 pistols.
-> Condition #3 does NOT apply to Gen5/M/G42/G43 pistols.

The three conditions I list above represent common but very serious assembly errors made by improperly-trained "armorers". All three may exist simultaneously, yet the pistol will appear to be fully functional to the neophyte armorer.

It does not help that every knucklehead as soon as he stops crapping yellow runs out and makes a "helpful" Glock U-toob video the day after he buys his first Glock, failing to make note of the potential for these very serious "occult" errors that won't be self-revealing in superficial post-assembly pistol function checks.

It takes only 30 seconds to check for all of these, if one is slow.

If I get to disassemble the slide, I check for proper firing pin spring cup installation, and for free motion of the firing pin and its engagement with the firing pin safety.

BONUS NOTES: :)
-> Ignore any posting in which the Slide Lock is called the "take down lever".
-> Ignore any posting in which the Slide Stop Lever is called the "slide lock".
Sounds like words of wisdom to me. Thanks for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I agree with JArthur. The slide spring needs to be below the top pin on A GEn4. Very common mistake.
Good point. I was careful to make sure the slide spring is underneath the top pin, not above it. Even though this was my first detail strip, I took a lot of time and care to make sure my reassembly was exactly like it was before disassembly. Firstly, I watched 14 or 15 different videos before settling on the one I used for my main guide (the out-of-focus ones and the ones done on non-Gen4 Glocks were immediately ignored). Then, before I removed any particular part, I took photos from multiple angles for later reference. That's my usual practice from my years of clock repair. Obviously, I failed to take a picture (or even notice) the orientation of the end of the trigger spring around the tang. Also obvious is my lack of experience with detail strips.
 

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You all might yell at me; I'm ready to take my lumps. I've field stripped my G19Gen4 many times, but I've never detail stripped it until now. Of course, guess where I got my instructions: YouTube. Here's the video I followed:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV0wDDFV0NY&feature=youtu.be

I wasn't terribly afraid of doing this job, because (1) I watched the video start-to-finish three times before starting, and (2) I've done clock & watch repair for years...yes I know a Glock is not a clock, but they both involve multiple parts that have to work together, and I know how to be meticulous. But apparently I wasn't...somewhere.
On reassembly, I checked the action of the slide - and I noticed the trigger does NOT reset after every slide cycle. That is to say (of course with no magazine in the magwell and nothing in the chamber), I pull the trigger and then pull the slide back and release it. The trigger does not reset until I pull the slide back and release it again! The trigger will consistently reset ONLY after two slide cycles in a row.
SHOULD I TAKE IT TO A GUNSMITH? Or is there an easy fix??
The trigger spring in the trigger assembly could be backwards. It's required that the spring appear as an S when you view it.
 

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You all might yell at me; I'm ready to take my lumps. I've field stripped my G19Gen4 many times, but I've never detail stripped it until now. Of course, guess where I got my instructions: YouTube. Here's the video I followed:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV0wDDFV0NY&feature=youtu.be

I wasn't terribly afraid of doing this job, because (1) I watched the video start-to-finish three times before starting, and (2) I've done clock & watch repair for years...yes I know a Glock is not a clock, but they both involve multiple parts that have to work together, and I know how to be meticulous. But apparently I wasn't...somewhere.
On reassembly, I checked the action of the slide - and I noticed the trigger does NOT reset after every slide cycle. That is to say (of course with no magazine in the magwell and nothing in the chamber), I pull the trigger and then pull the slide back and release it. The trigger does not reset until I pull the slide back and release it again! The trigger will consistently reset ONLY after two slide cycles in a row.
SHOULD I TAKE IT TO A GUNSMITH? Or is there an easy fix??
Check your trigger spring you may have it in backwards or off to the side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
The trigger spring in the trigger assembly could be backwards. It's required that the spring appear as an S when you view it.
Yes, I was aware of that, and as previously mentioned I was careful to maintain the “S” shape.
Check your trigger spring you may have it in backwards or off to the side.
The problem has been corrected. See my previous posts.
 

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This has turned out to be a very informative post and I am always wanting to learn more about my glocks.Just finished fieldstripping and checking all my glocks and will have to remind my brother to get all of his glocks out so I can check his.
Mike M,you are correct about all the u tube idiots who post how-to vids after they lucked out and somehow managed to get their glocks reassembled and functioning.Between the screaming kids,chirping birds,barking dogs and background rap music if you want to call it music,these guys are truly laughable!
Thank You azks804
 

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GOOD POST! Never be afraid of looking dumb though. I try to stay away from Youtube myself unless posted by known reputable sources such as say Brownell's, Midway, etc...
To much pure Fake & to much from people who don't know what their doing. Whatever you want though. That's just MY way of looking at it.
 

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I love learning how to tear down and put a gun back together. Best way to learn is to screw it up! You’ll never forget that part of it again. And shows you know how to do a proper function check upon completion. Keep building that confidence and learn your gun!
 

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Yep. You came to the right place for assistance.

Congratulations on fixing your own weapon..

( with the help of some very knowledgeable GT members )
 
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