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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With bulk buying in mind & storing inside my home ( humidity controlled ) is there any recommended timeline to use these components? I'm thinking 4-8 # of powder & 5-10,000 primers.
 

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EX-Swage Monkey
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Nothing really unless you live in a swamp. I just store mine in the closet where it stay a pretty constant tempature. Just leave them in your original container and you will be okay.
 

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Nothing really unless you live in a swamp. I just store mine in the closet where it stay a pretty constant tempature. Just leave them in your original container and you will be okay.
:agree:

IGF
 

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With bulk buying in mind & storing inside my home ( humidity controlled ) is there any recommended timeline to use these components? I'm thinking 4-8 # of powder & 5-10,000 primers.
Store them at my house. No humidity. Plus, I simply won't allow them to die due to age.
 

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Nothing really unless you live in a swamp. I just store mine in the closet where it stay a pretty constant tempature. Just leave them in your original container and you will be okay.
For a new guy you learn quick. I was poking around in my primer stash the other day & found 1K LP form 1990, loaded em up & shot some, 100%, no variation over the chrono from my newer stuff. Powder & primers, along with ammo, will last almost indefinitely stored properly: cool & dry.
 

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DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.
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One of the tricks I learned a long time ago is when you buy in large containers. Either save or buy a 1lb container of the same type powder. That way you pour out of the one lb. container and not the large one when loading.
Also when using different lot numbers. Always check to make sure you are still throwing the same amount of powder. I have had it happen to me two or three times. When the same type powder did not weigh the same from different lot numbers.
 

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Crusty Member
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One of the tricks I learned a long time ago is when you buy in large containers. Either save or buy a 1lb container of the same type powder. That way you pour out of the one lb. container and not the large one when loading.
Also when using different lot numbers. Always check to make sure you are still throwing the same amount of powder. I have had it happen to me two or three times. When the same type powder did not weigh the same from different lot numbers.
Every time I put powder in the hopper, I check to make sure it's dropping the right amount...and I never leave it in there between loading sessions.

As for long term storage, I wonder, is proper storage of jacketed bullets more important than the powder and primers? i.e. PD and Speer Gold Dot bullets left indoors in an open box, seem to be tarnishing. MG don't seem to have this problem...perhaps due to different jacket material. I've started keeping the ones that'll tarnish in .30 cal cans with a desi pack.
 

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DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.
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Every time I put powder in the hopper, I check to make sure it's dropping the right amount...and I never leave it in there between loading sessions.
I think you are missing my point.
 

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Crusty Member
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I think you are missing my point.
Not sure if I am or not. I'm saying never take for granted that your powder system is dropping what you expect, just because you're using the same powder you used last time.

I think you're saying that the density of the powder may be different from lot to lot. Even if that wasn't a concern, I'm saying don't take the powder measure calibration for granted.
 

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Bustin Caps
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With bulk buying in mind & storing inside my home ( humidity controlled ) is there any recommended timeline to use these components? I'm thinking 4-8 # of powder & 5-10,000 primers.
That's a solid six month supply, not sure if you think it will go bad in that amount of time.

:tongueout:
 

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Conifer Jack
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I store my powder in the bathroom... I find the extreme humidity greatly reduces recoil. :whistling:


Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
"A merry heart doeth good as a medicine" - you guys got that one down. Too funny!
 

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DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.
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I store my powder in the bathroom... I find the extreme humidity greatly reduces recoil. :whistling:


Jack
I thought you kept it under the bed afraid Steve would steal it? Or was that the lead?:whistling:
 

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local trouble maker
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If you were to read the law most states require powder and primers(5K or more) to be stored in a plywood box made out of 3/4 inch plywood. So I store mine in a steel tool chest that I found somewhere near the navy base.:couch:
 

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If you were to read the law most states require powder and primers(5K or more) to be stored in a plywood box made out of 3/4 inch plywood. So I store mine in a steel tool chest that I found somewhere near the navy base.:couch:
Actually I thionk there is a national fire code, NFPA, that almost every state goes by & requires 25#-50# to be stored in a wooden locker w/ 1" mat'l. More than that needs a certified powder magazine, what ever that is. Primers are no more than 10K in a residence & I am sure none of us has more than 10K.:whistling:
http://www.saami.org/specifications.../download/SAAMI_ITEM_200-Smokeless_Powder.pdf
http://www.beartoothbullets.com/tech_notes/archive_tech_notes.htm/60
 

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DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.
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If you were to read the law most states require powder and primers(5K or more) to be stored in a plywood box made out of 3/4 inch plywood. So I store mine in a steel tool chest that I found somewhere near the navy base.:couch:
Everything that I have read on this subject is if you have more than twenty pounds of powder it must be stored in a wooden box with walls of minimum thickness of 1”. With weak seams. And not to store them in a metal containers.
With the wooden box it is so that if you have a fire. The 1”
Wood box if it is on fire It well give the fire department time to get it out of the house. The weak seams is so that if the heat or fire gets to the powder. It well let the gases escape without causing an explosion.
It is also a good idea to mark the box of what it is and have wheels on it so that it can be easily be pulled out of the house. Also a way to pull it out also.
Something else that a lot of people don’t think about is having a fire extinguisher close by in the reloading room.
 

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DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.
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local trouble maker
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I am more worried about theft than fire.
 
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