GlockTalk Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,036 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I need concrete poured in cold weather. I've been reading that it needs to be above 40 degrees consistently for 48 hours however there were things to be done that could help but it seemed like it would be best to wait for when you know the weather is going to warm for a few days.

I know there have got to be a few construction gurus from colder climates. I figure you guys either know all the tricks or just wait until spring.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,326 Posts
How large a area? What does it need to do? What are you willing to pay? What are ground temps?
If temps are near 40 during day, it’s a sidewalk, smaller area... it could be enclosed, heated, uncovered in @40f weather, poured, recovered and heated couple days.
The stuff self heats for a few hrs. Local concrete folks should know what works the best for you location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
So I need concrete poured in cold weather. I've been reading that it needs to be above 40 degrees consistently for 48 hours however there were things to be done that could help but it seemed like it would be best to wait for when you know the weather is going to warm for a few days.

I know there have got to be a few construction gurus from colder climates. I figure you guys either know all the tricks or just wait until spring.
used motor oil works great
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,764 Posts
if you add too much anti-freeze or calcium chloride you run the risk of failure come spring............have seen it collapse and cause huge destruction of things built on it in previous winter. don't ignore the weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,036 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Good to hear these things. A lot of it is backing up what I have read so far. The second day freeze is new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,511 Posts
For the strongest concrete and least chance of screwing something up it is best to pour in decent weather > 40 degrees F. and avoid additives ifs possible. Also, the slower the concrete cures the stronger it will be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,005 Posts
I will only pour in the cold if it is like posts or something like footings for a shed or similar. Nothing load bearing or flat work. Nothing that needs to look nice. Just too many headaches later.

Poured a pathway in the cold. Used additive and insulation. It was thick and hard to work. Top spalled off in the summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,503 Posts
Good rule of thumb is 40 degrees and rising, never pour on a frozen base, you can still get freeze damage on the second night. After concrete has set enough to get a hard trowel finish you can put a protective covering such as a poly film that will hold the heat in the concrete. If the temp is going to be a VERY hard freeze you can blow hot air under the covering to add heat. If you absolutely need to pour and the temp is below freezing you have to heat the base you are pouring on and use either concrete batched with hot water or use a chemical that replaces water that allows concrete to flow but soon starts to set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,489 Posts
At the factory we used to place concrete slabs in the winter. We would have steam hoses running overnight under canvas to warm the base layer stone. Come morning we would pour and place recording thermometers in it. Then we would cover it with blankets. The concrete temperature would rise up to 85 degrees F.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,326 Posts
For the strongest concrete and least chance of screwing something up it is best to pour in decent weather > 40 degrees F. and avoid additives ifs possible. Also, the slower the concrete cures the stronger it will be.
I have been told that some additives can improve it. There are (I forget name) you add stuff to improve flexibility, expansion, contraction...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,909 Posts
Well there must be way to pour concrete below 40 degrees because we would have a lot of dirt roads.

It must not be easy because we have a lot of dirt roads. :animlol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,402 Posts
So I need concrete poured in cold weather. I've been reading that it needs to be above 40 degrees consistently for 48 hours however there were things to be done that could help but it seemed like it would be best to wait for when you know the weather is going to warm for a few days.

I know there have got to be a few construction gurus from colder climates. I figure you guys either know all the tricks or just wait until spring.
there are cold weather concrete mix designs. You just need to talk to the ready-mix company that’s going to provide the concrete for you.

also, you need curing blankets and heaters.

that’s how industrial concrete placement is done in cold weather.
 

·
Director of civil unrest
Joined
·
9,257 Posts
I hate working with concrete. I've purposely forgotten everything I've ever known about it. Sorry.
 

·
Use it up, throw it away
Joined
·
8,746 Posts
For the strongest concrete and least chance of screwing something up it is best to pour in decent weather > 40 degrees F. and avoid additives ifs possible. Also, the slower the concrete cures the stronger it will be.
I'm guessing that's why they cover a new pour with damp blankets and keep them slightly damp in very warm weather.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top