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Possible to use old wireless router as access point?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by gadget_guy, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. gadget_guy

    gadget_guy The handyman

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    I noticed almost an answer on a post the other day, but not quite.

    Is it possible to use an old wireless router as an access point? I can hard wire this to the "real" or main router. (and if so, would I use a cross over cable?) I guess the actual device I am looking at would be this: netgear WGT624

    NETGEAR’s 108 Mbps Wireless Router boosts your network performance with up to twice the speed and as much as four times the coverage of standard 802.11g connections. Now you can quickly send large files typical of digital photos, music, and high-quality movie streams across the network. What's more, an integrated Security Dashboard enables router-based Parental Controls to manage access to inappropriate websites. The 108 Mbps Wireless Router also helps protect against viruses, spyware, spam email and other Internet security threats thanks to a free trial version of Trend Micro Home Network Security. The router features double firewall protection that helps shield the network with two security methods—Network Address Translation (NAT) and Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI).


    Setup and reason I ask:

    Netgear said they would send me a new WGT624 this week as I have had nothing but trouble with mine. I replaced it with another brand that works just fine and provides the coverage and speeds I need. Now I have one more useless router sitting on a shelf here at home. There are 3 hubs one hardwired router, and an old b wireless router on that same shelf. Dusty shelf.

    HOWEVER:
    We now are looking at moving into my parent's guest house while our house sells. (another story in itself) They have hardwired network at their house but were planning on going wireless very soon.

    My crazy plan:

    Here was my plan replace their router with my working wireless router - they now have wire/wireless at home.

    Wireless coverage (I don't think) will reach all the way to the guest house where my wife and I would plan on like 2-3 hardwired computers and 3-6 wireless computers.

    Is it possible for me to still use that Netgear as a dumb access point/hub at the guest house (assuming this new one works) or is that not possible? I can run a Cat5e out to the guest house, but need wireless here as well. Guess I was just trying to save a few bucks by using this old hardware, since I know very little about network hardware, I could be totally wrong and just need to go buy an access point and be done.

    BTW, it does not really matter to me if my parents and I are on the same network (they can see my shared drives and printers...) or if we are on a different subnet.

    Thanks in advance. :thumbsup: a

    If not, anyone looking to buy a superG router? It should be new in the box... If it's like my old one, you need to reboot it at least once a week (sometimes twice a day). The hardwired ports randomly go bad from time to time, and the "4 times wireless coverage" is about 50 feet on a good day inside the house. (am I a salesman or what)
     
  2. HAVOC

    HAVOC Remember CLM Millennium Member

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    Assuming the router works, what you're trying to do will work fine. You can plug the cat5 from the house into the WAN port and route your network off theirs, then they can't see your network. The issue with this is you need to be careful about your IP structure on both sides of your router, having the same subnet on both sides of a router can cause all sorts of confusion.


    Or you can plug the cat5 from the house into a LAN port on the router and then it's just a switch and an AP. In this design, you'll need a crossover cable, or the uplink port on one of the switches/routers, unless one or the other (or both) auto detects MDI/MDI-X. Another possible issue is that some routers block traffic between the LAN and the WLAN, and only pass packets between WAN and WLAN. You'd have to turn off that feature using this second architecture.
     

  3. breakwater

    breakwater

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    Cool stuff.

    I bridged 2 Linksys's access points to get ethernet to my garage. Once you have ethernet there, you can put a wifi point out there for general access, and have another in the main house. Takes 4 units, but insures good coverage and fast speeds. You can piggy back, but once you make a bridge w/ 2 access points, its all they can do, hence the addition of more access points.

    Make sense?


    U can use that router as an access point by itself. Shut of DHCP and give the lan port an IP on your subnet (sumpin like 192.168.1.x) and you're all set. Just stay away from the WAN port.

    Sweet!
     
  4. gadget_guy

    gadget_guy The handyman

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    Thanks guys! Might find a good use for some of this old stuff laying around.