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Polishing Glock Safe?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by BurgerMcDo, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. BurgerMcDo

    BurgerMcDo

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    Just a quick question, I know that the slide and the barrel are Tenifer treated but how about the other metal parts of the pistol? Does polishing this parts (using flitz) like the trigger bar will remove any protective coating? Thanks in advance.

    I actually sent an email to Glock, but it's been a week now and they have not yet replied.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012
  2. evenodds20

    evenodds20 Ask me tomorrow

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    i saw a guy on youtube polish slide rails and everything internal on a glock 21SF. I don't think there is any protective coating but I'm not 100% sure. i say go for it.
     

  3. BurgerMcDo

    BurgerMcDo

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    I want polish it to look neat and easier to clean but again I don't want to ruin the protective coating if there is any.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012
  4. AustinTx

    AustinTx

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    Polishing Glock Safe?

    I didn't even know that Glock made safes.:snoopy:
     
  5. gunsmoke92

    gunsmoke92

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    Shining them up, no harm, no foul, as there are no protective coatings to damage . Just don't start removing too much metal, that would be bad.

    Just so you know, you're about to get flamed by every purist on the forum. However, at the end of the day, it's your gun and you have to live with the results of your deeds. Fortunately, it's a Glock, and replacement part are readily available to repair your transgressions if need be.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012
  6. BurgerMcDo

    BurgerMcDo

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    Thanks for the reply.
     
  7. mr_fender

    mr_fender

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    Actually there is a protective coating. Internals are electroless nickel plated to prevent corrosion. It is possible to polish through the plating, but you'd have to really be aggressive with a dremel or sandpaper or something. It's pretty tough. A light polish with flitz on a felt pad is pretty gentle. Just don't go overboard.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012
  8. MikeSantor

    MikeSantor

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    Flitz protects against corrosion.

    Unless you live in a state that is 100% humidity all the time, Carry the gun in your sweaty armpit everyday and dont take it off even to bathe, I would not worry about it.

    I just got my first glock. I dont know if this is normal but I had some pitting on a few of the actual areas that need the .25c polish. So I started at 200 grit to get all the pits out. I took maybe 1/32'' down. Then from there I sanded all the way down to 12,000 grit to get the mirror finish. Finished it off with flitz and now everything has a MIRROR shine. Not just shiny, not a gunmetal grey color with some shine, Its actual Mirror. Clear as day.

    I also Have a FN Fiveseven that is accurized by Elite Ammunition. They Mirror polish all of the internals just like I did. The work was done almost a year ago now(11 months), Has 5k+ rounds threw it, Has been cleaned only 4 times and has no signs of rust. I have even looked at it recently with a 30x jewelers loop. Shiny and smooth.

    Second example I have is my Remington 870. I did the same thing on a bunch of parts. Polished with sandpaper and flitz to a mirror shine. This Shotgun has over 3k rounds since I have done it and has been left out side over night about 3 times and still shows no signs of rust.

    I live in the midwest by the way.


    I know Im going to get flamed for this but...
    On the glock in specific, and the parts that you are supposed to be polishing, I say there is no possible way that you can take off too much metal with JUST a felt wheel and some flitz. If you look at how the glock works, My personal opinion is you would have to take upwards of like 1/8 inch off of everything for stuff to stop working like it should. Maybe a little less. There is no way you are taking an 8th off steel with just a damn felt wheel on a small dremel.

    I have read too many people on here telling others to watch how much they polish with just a rag and flitz. You are going to rub a whole through your thumb long before you rub off enough metal by hand to make your glock not function properly.

    my .02
     
  9. yellowlabsrule

    yellowlabsrule

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    Not that tough to polish through the finish on the firing pin safety if you are using polishing stone. :whistling:
     
  10. mr_fender

    mr_fender

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    Very true. Stones will definitely take off some steel. Even with flitz, you can go too far if you're using a dremel or other power tool with a heavy hand. They speed things up, but you give up precision and control. It depends largely on the extent of the roughness. A lot of people say that you should not remove any metal, but if your parts have rough raised burrs, a simple polish isn't going to do much. My G19's trigger bar was very rough and the edges were extremely uneven. Had to resort to stones on that one. I also like to break the sharp corners of the firing pin block plunger with stones. Makes the takeup much smoother.
     
  11. BurgerMcDo

    BurgerMcDo

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    Thanks for the info. If ever I decided to polish those internal parts, I 'll be just using cotton buds and Flitz.
     
  12. JBS

    JBS

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    You may want to think that over again. 1/32 is 0.03125 and 1/8 is 0.125 If you took that much martial off off fire control parts they are ruined. The plating on those parts is only .002 to .005 at most. :whistling:
     
  13. Keyhole

    Keyhole

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    On my 34 I've polished the trigger bar, firing pin safety, connector, bottom/contact area of the firing pin, top/bottom of the extractor, the ejector, the locking block, and the rails with Flitz and a felt Dremel tip. No problem and looks sharp. The only part that made any difference, though, is the trigger bar and the firing pin safety. Be careful with the edges on the firing pin safety, but there are other threads on here that detail that with diagrams.
     
  14. Gpruitt54

    Gpruitt54

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    I have a Glock 19 and 27 being shipped. I am interested in polishing some parts. So, I called Glock with some questions about this subject. If you are interested in keeping your warrentee in tact, you might want to consider having a untouched set of parts on hand; to reinstall, in case you need to send in your Glock back to Glock for repair.

    Glock says (as you might expect) polishing internals or externals will void the warrentee. But, at the end of the day, it's your gun, you paid for it, and you can do with it, what ever you want. I'm polishing some part of my Glocks, when they arrive.
     
  15. hsprincipal

    hsprincipal

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    I've polish all my Glocks with WWB, Federal and Hornady. It's a lot more fun and a lot less work.
     
  16. SouthpawG26

    SouthpawG26

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    OP, Glock isn't going to tell you that it's OK to modify anything on the gun. They will not take or assume any risk. That said, a good polish of the plated parts without power tools is no problem whatsoever.
     
  17. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

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    1/32 inch (.03") is a lot of metal; so it would depend on where you removed it from. I suspect you're talking about the sides of the trigger bar. (I've had a few, 'rough and dirty' trigger bars pass through my hands. I cleaned and polished them up, and they work. (I've got one inside my G-19, right now.)

    I've found it very difficult to keep up with what the factory does with Glock internals. From what I've been able to glean some parts are Tenifer-treated and electroless nickel plated, at one time, and at another time, these same parts are not. (I've stopped trying to keep up with it.)

    My Glock internals are mirror polished all over, too. I used a Dremel Tool and did it with, both, cotton and felt wheels, and Flitz Metal Polish. I'm going to agree that it is possible to remove metal - or, more specifically - to round edges with a Dremel Tool. Not very likely (except in the hands of an orangutan) but possible. What you really have to watch out for is, 'burning' the metal.

    When I polish I always work barehanded in order to gauge heat buildup in the metal. Neither do I keep the polishing head in contact with the metal for more than 3 or 4 seconds at a time. A light touch is always preferable to a heavy push whenever you're working with a Dremel Tool.

    You've already been flamed; but that was for something else! :supergrin:

    You're right! What you can do, though, is round the edges; and that's not something you ever want to do to either a Glock's sear, (trigger bar kick plate) or the bottom of the striker lug.

    I've only been messing with Glocks for the past ten years; but, in my experience, all new Glock pistols can use a good internal parts polishing. I've talked with Morris Dagley at Aro-Tek about this, and he agrees. In fact Morris polished my first Glock for me. The purpose to polishing Glock internals is not to make them shiny or easier to clean; it's to reduce friction, instead.

    I've said this before; but, I'll offer it again: I consider all new Glock pistols to be, 'basic gun parts kits'. :supergrin: The caveat is that before anyone starts messing around with a Glock he should really know what he's supposed to be doing, and have read the PTOOMA Glock Reference Manual (literally) from cover-to-cover. ;)

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/45...evised-3rd-edition-book-by-ptooma-productions

    A word of warning: NEVER trust anything you see on YouTube. Like so very much of what's posted on the Internet those YouTube videos are loaded with, 'ego and mistakes' - Lots and lots of them. For whatever it's worth: I've never seen a Glock video on YouTube that I would give more than, '3 out of 5 stars' to.
     
  18. MikeSantor

    MikeSantor

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    What is your definition of "Ruined"?

    Since the polishing I have shot approx 600 rounds through my 17. 400 of WWB and 200 of Federal maroon box. Not one single hiccup and not one piece of brass to my face.

    :whistling:
     
  19. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

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    Don't mind what's his name. In addition to being a prominent on-line psychoanalyst, he's, also, an outstanding internet gun forum expert, too.

    (Kind 'a the, 'Doctor Phil of guns') ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2012
  20. JBS

    JBS

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    Then your estimation of how much metal you really polished off where a bit off.