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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know someone who actually worked in Iraq as a police instructor in the Iraq police academy ? The last posting I saw said $12,750 a month, room, board, transport and R&R included.
 

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That's $153K a year. Lawman makes that in OT in 6 months...:rofl:
 

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I've known a few guys who did it for a while, back early on. Easier money working security, which is what a couple of 'em are doing now.
 

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Don't be sure that it is a sure bet. One of ours took a DynCorp job about five months ago. He is now facing a new contract and a 12 month extension if he doesn't want to get royally screwed on taxes by leaving now and returning.

Good money but as things wind down, no longer a sure bet, especially in the Obama State Department.
 

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MDW Guns
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I got this picture from him with the statement:
Here are my two best shooters; they actually hit the target at 50 yards with 50 rounds exactly 3 times.
He did not say if that was 3 times total together or each by himself.
That after 2 weeks of training!
I asked if that was just an act and he assured me, that these people just simple farmers who can't do better!

He also wrote that he was forced into a "new contract" with longer running time and he would had his first time off in May, which got scraped with the new contract.
Also living conditions are harsh.
While food is OK, it is very cold with nights in single minus numbers and quarters are the regular Army tents with 9 other persons living together.
However, they do have internet and phone service in the middle of Afghanistan on some ..... hill.

Anyway, no matter how you turn it; it's not easy money!
The risk is not only getting RPG'd, IED'd or simply shoot.
Afghanistan has the highest rate of malaria and god knows what other diseases.
Then there are scorpions, camel spiders ......
You also have to see the fact, that you are putting in 10-12 hours a day every day.
 

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NRA4EVR
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I asked if that was just an act and he assured me, that these people just simple farmers who can't do better!
Wasn't Sgt. York a simple farmer? Maybe the hadjis are dipping into their opium harvest...
 

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Crazy CO
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I know of one fellow who worked in Afghanistan. He came back just a little too soon because of a contract getting scrapped and now owes the IRS all the back taxes. If he had stayed OCONUS just a little longer he would not have owed it. And, keep in mind that you probably won't have the same protections that are afforded our military over there.
 

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I know of one fellow who worked in Afghanistan. He came back just a little too soon because of a contract getting scrapped and now owes the IRS all the back taxes. If he had stayed OCONUS just a little longer he would not have owed it. And, keep in mind that you probably won't have the same protections that are afforded our military over there.
My unit helped train some IP's back in '04-'05. They got issued a bunch of new G17's, then promptly sold them on the street to god knows who and came back saying they were "stolen" by insurgents. 3/4 of the class of around 100 experienced this coincidental theft.

The excuse that they are just poor farmers carries no weight. The problem lies in their religion based culture, and the concept of "insha'allah". They truley believe that if god wills something then they cannot or dare not attempt to effect it. They apply it to all aspects of their lives, right down to something as simple as using the sights on their rifles. Can't hit the target? Insha'Allah...insurgents running rampant in your town? Oh well, wait for god to take care of it, or not.

As far as the contractor gigs are concerned, to make the really high end money you have to get on in the higher levels of Xe, Triple Canopy, or the like. For the kinds of gigs which are a couple hundred grand a year you are looking at qualifications equal to that of a teir one operator (you have no idea how much it pains me to use that phrase...I feel "tactical" now). The lower level contracts are often subject to change or cancellation without notice, and like Hack said you aren't protected by the government if something goes wrong, and are likely as not to get hung out to dry by your employer.

Also, if you do work the duration of your contract, once it is up you need to re-apply for another if you want to go back. Is $80-100k worth the uninsured risk? Only you can decide, and I know some guys who have gone the contractor route and loved it. I know far more who ended up owing a lump sum of taxes to the .gov, or who were stuck guarding a base in Kuwait in 140 degree temps for 8 months.

FWIW the only guys I know who have positive things to say about contracting of this nature are the hard chargers who got on with Triple Canopy in the beginning and put serious work in as personal security in the Green Zone and surrounding areas. Most of that work is passed now. Just my $.02, and I have no firsthand experience so it's all heresay anyway.
 

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I know of one fellow who worked in Afghanistan. He came back just a little too soon because of a contract getting scrapped and now owes the IRS all the back taxes. If he had stayed OCONUS just a little longer he would not have owed it. And, keep in mind that you probably won't have the same protections that are afforded our military over there.
That is the position our guy is in. If he returns now, he will get raped financially by the IRS. So, he signs a contract extension/new contract.

He mentions that he spends a fair deal of time at the FOB.

Anyway, no kids for him so he and his wife seem to be okay with that.
 

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Does anyone know someone who actually worked in Iraq as a police instructor in the Iraq police academy ? The last posting I saw said $12,750 a month, room, board, transport and R&R included.
I knew a guy that had done that in Iraq. He let to work with my old company, great guy. Called the other day, voicemail said he'd get back with me when he can, but he's out of the country for a few months....

Guessing he went back overseas. Probably Afghanistan this time I'd guess.
I know he was making that kind of money, and I know he was ready to give it all back one time he was in a convoy driving past something everyone thought was an IED. Forget the story details, I think it was an abandoned car/truck at the side of the road.

Randy
 

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I would do serious research into the company before signing on. I've not heard bad things about good companies such as MPRI. I've heard some tall tales about the quality of some of the contract employes being hired by companies I've never heard of. Some of those shanigans have made the news. Stay with a known entity and you'd likely be better off.
 

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My buddy did a tour for DynCorp a few years ago teaching Iraqi's how to be police. He got paid ALOT of money tax free. Something like $10,000 a month? I think its safe to say those sweet gigs are hard to come by nowadays with the downsizing of US forces in country.
 

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A buddy of mine just finished initial training with a major civilian contracting company. He thinks he is going to Baghdad. We'll see
 

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While I have done a few tours overseas as a soldier, I have worked with many contractors. I am also a police officer next to Fort Hood and know a few officer that have gone over.

It really is hit or miss for the job and living standards. It goes for both soldiers and contractors. You dont know what you will really get till you get there.

Looking at what I did as a soldier and the money I made, a contractor would much better in many ways. But you have to go with a mind set that you will be living out of a few bags and in the worst living conditions you can think of. You may be a target by the enemy as you are training police, something the bad guy's dont like.

One of the local officers that just got back, said he might go back. He was not former military, and the living standards at first were a shock for him. At the end of a year he was used to it and liked his bank account. He was tasked with training locals and going down town with them to do missions and investigate crimes. Very busy high visability work. While he thought the people were idiots a few were good learners and gave him some light at the end of the tunnel. He was thought it was better going with the locals doing things vs just staying in the base training. But at first he had the fear that off the base you are a target, once he got over that things were better.

My first OIF tour in 2003-05 things were bad. But the more we went out, the more we liked the job. Yes we were at more risk of injury or death and yes IED's and snipers are a real threat, but some people like adventure vs stuck in an area only doing training. You risk your life, but if you work patrol you risk your life every day in America where we are not in a real war.

The only issue I would have is getting injured. I know a local deputy that went over and got injured. I have not met up with him yet, but I do know he will not do law enforcement again and dont know who covers his injury or any disability pay (nice thing about the Military is even though the pay sucks for combat, the government will take care of you for life).

If I did not deploy with the Military (National Guard) so often and my work would let me go for a year and the wife agreed, I would go as my kids are adults. If I was single I would be there right now. I like how bad things can suck at times, makes you respect America that much more in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think I'd sign up in a second if the wife and kids were not an issue. I just can't imagine leaving right now, but I'm also wondering at what age do you become "undesirable" as a contractor ? At 43 I fell like I'm in my common sense prime !
 

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I think I'd sign up in a second if the wife and kids were not an issue. I just can't imagine leaving right now, but I'm also wondering at what age do you become "undesirable" as a contractor ? At 43 I fell like I'm in my common sense prime !
Some of the best guys that I worked with were in their 60s, of course, I was doing Security work, not running a training school.

I'm not sure you could pay me enough to be a trainer. I have spent too much time with the Hadji culture. The story earlier about Insh'alllah is so spot on.

Just watch them drive, it's wherever Allah wills them to go; it's all about shedding responsibility.

I had a friend who was telling me some stories about training Iraqi Police. Their class was on a break and sitting down in the shade. One of the Iraqi Police was using the tip of his barrel to rest his hand and head.

Boom!!! On less Iraqi Policemen... The others basically treated it as Insh'allah.

That story didn't really surprise me after I had seen some Afganis using shovels to smack UXO to check if it was safe so they could pick it up and put it in a wheelbarrow. Don't know about you, but I would never walk up to UXO and smack it with a shovel, that's just asking for it.

Some of us got snacks and we sat and watched as these guys played russian roulette. At least it was entertaining.
 
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