Home > The Main Room > The Okie Corral > Plastic rain.

Plastic rain.

  1. I think the major cause for this "plastic rain" passed away a while ago...but his damage lives on forever.

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  2. Another reason to like cotton and wool clothing.
     
  3. Wasn't acid rain supposed to be melting our car paint by now? I remember being told that back in the 90's...of course we were also supposed to all have AIDS by now and Florida was supposed to be underwater so I wouldn't have cared anyway.
     
  4. Damn; now I feel so guilty for binge buying all of that Magpul gear and lots of Glocks and thus helping to propagate all of this End of Days gloom and doom. As it has been said somewhere else: we humans are the virus. Guess some Hollywood turd was right, after all.

    Oh well. We jus' be doin' wat we dooz. Better get used to it.
     
  5. There was also a push to save the Amazon from deforestation in the '90s. Consequently, stores switched from using paper bags to plastic bags. Solved one crisis while inadvertently creating another.
     
  6. Maybe the story explained it and I just didn't care enough to read it. But, rain is water that has evaporated. Plastic doesn't evaporate last time I checked. I put this right up there with Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny and Corona Virus.
     
  7. They get into the air from a variety of means.

    "Microplastic particles, tiny chunks (by definition, less than 5 millimeters long) of fragmented plastic bottles and microfibers that fray from clothes, all pollutants that get caught up in Earth’s atmospheric systems and deposited in the wilderness."
     
  8. Well, they put in pollution controls, so it got better.

    " The aim of the amendment was to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions, created primarily by fossil fuel-burning facilities, to about 50 percent of the 18.9 million tons produced annually in 1980, and in turn, to alter the trend of ever-increasing problems tied to acid rain throughout the Northeast and Midwest. The goal was to reach that 50 percent reduction mark by 2010.

    When the numbers were tallied in 2010, it was clear that the Clean Air Act amendments had accomplished their goal. With the regulations imposed, sulfur dioxide emissions were down to 8.9 million tons per year. Ecosystems that had been all but wiped out by overly acidic precipitation were beginning to recover, such as Brooktrout Lake in New York’s Adirondack Mountains. In its annual report on acid rain, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggested that the decrease in emissions was directly related to reduced levels of heart attacks and respiratory conditions, saving an estimated 20,000 to 50,000 lives annually. In fact, by 2010, the measures had been so successful that there did not seem to be an acid rain problem at all, says Doug Burns, a researcher at the U.S. Geological Survey and director of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program based in Troy, N.Y."

    https://www.earthmagazine.org/artic...ss-battle-against-acid-rain-challenges-remain
     
  9. Dude you are incredibly fast with this stuff! LMAO
     
  10. Is this because the murder Hornets didn't work?
     
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  13. I'm old, no kids, I'm selfish too, so I just don't give a ****
     
  14. I’m still scanning satellite imagery for the Pacific Ocean garbage island.
     
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    Right on target! Plus the world was gonna run outa oil, the polar bears would all be dead and the ozone layer was gonna be gone ;)
     
  16. Quick! Form another government agency and raise taxes to combat this new plague on our world. If we don’t, we’re doomed I tell ya doomed!
     
  17. Also know as the " Law of Unintended Consequences ".

    :D
     
  18. don’t forget the rain forest were all
    going to be gone. We all switched to plastic because of it and here we are with plastic rain.
     
  19. So the rain(nature) is cleaning the air of dust, pollen, other particles in the air and now plastic. Just like it always has. Not going to get too worked up over this.
     
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  21. I don't know what you do for a living. It sure ain't related to science.
     
  22. Not really. Every summer there are times where us South Florida residents have to clean the yellow/brown dirt off our cars probably like SoCal people do from the AZ desert.

    Ours comes from the Sahara Desert in Africa. Stuff gets blown around. Try playing with some fiberglass fillers, crap is like Helium.